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rated:
There is a lot of change going on at my company. Our department is being reorganized and I feel a couple people may be on the outside of that plan looking in.  In case I'm one of those, I'm wondering what's the best approach to ensure my wellbeing as best as possible? 

My wife works but hers doesnt quite cover all the bills.  
Im a mechanical engineer with 11 years experience in hvac consulting, and extreme environment sealing systems such as oil and gas, semicon, industrial, etc.  to be clear, I don't work in those industries, but we make sealing systems for those industries and sell to them. 

We live as far south EAST as you can just about without going into Florida.    My city is not a big industrial/ manufacturing city by any means.  I prefer not to move because my wife has a great job she loves and we don't really want to move.   

I would take a job elsewhere if it meant driving 4-6 hours and staying all week for as long as I needed to to keep the lights on. 

We do have some savings.   With her bringing in income we could survive a year without totally draining our savings, though it would eat up most of it. 

If the worst happens, I'll be applying for anything and everything including waiting tables, or grocery store or pest treatment guy, anything.  However realistically I dunno if any of those places would hire me as I'm way over qualified.  

I'm already looking and updated my résumé just in case. 
Mom interested in joining another industry such as finance( such as being a financial advisor or similar in banking). I'm very good with numbers and data and have an interest in that anyway.   I'm also interested I marketing but that's even a further stretch from engineering.  

I'm probably more prepared that 80% of people but it scares me and I want to do everything right and take the best steps forward to ensure our wellbeing. 

Im thinking if the worst happens to go immediately and register to take a realestate class and get my liscense.   I have a friend who can probably get me on somewhere and since I won't need a check immediately, could give me a little time to make a sale and might net more income than grocery clerk. 

Anything else I should be doing in preparation? 

Any hot spots for jobs I should consider for a "working remotely for a few months to a year" situation?   North Dakota fracking comes to mind but id rather be able to return home on weekends.  

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No doubt a 5% card bumps my $100 estimate up to $250. 

Any chance you could just clear me up on how to scale a bit?   Ie,... (more)

RhizzleBop (Sep. 07, 2014 @ 6:29p) |

MS is a very geographic-dependant area.  VRs are (mostly?) dead...some people can find them at places coded as gas for s... (more)

floressalicis (Sep. 09, 2014 @ 11:49a) |

Do you also have a bomb shelter in your backyard?

rufflesinc (Sep. 09, 2014 @ 11:57a) |


rated:
RhizzleBop said:   
We live as far south EAST as you can just about without going into Florida.    My city is not a big industrial/ manufacturing city by any means.  I prefer not to move because my wife has a great job she loves and we don't really want to move.   

I would take a job elsewhere if it meant driving 4-6 hours and staying all week for as long as I needed to to keep the lights on. 

Any hot spots for jobs I should consider for a "working remotely for a few months to a year" situation?   North Dakota fracking comes to mind but id rather be able to return home on weekends.  

  Atlanta?

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There are lots of jobs in jacksonville, FL, and it's about as far northeast in FL you can go without going into GA.
Alternatively, tons of DoD/defense jobs in Brunswick, GA, submarines and ships need HVAC in extreme environments.

rated:
Valdosta, GA?

What is your unemployment benefits situation? After a quick Google, it looks like the max in GA may be $330 per week. I'd get as much into savings now and then use the UIB as you are looking for another job.

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north of Georgia but that's as far as I'm comfy narrowing it down for privacy sake.   I'll look into Brunswick.    What kind of industry dominates in Jacksonville? 

Anything on other industries to investigate with an ME degree?   The RE liscense?  

rated:
JAX has a lot of Naval stuff going on. My engineering company is based in North Atlanta and has a lot of jobs at SPAWAR in Charleston and Huntsville.

rated:
if you're north of GA, then SC - there's also plenty of options in Charleston and Savannah.
If you can't figure out what sort of industry you can get into with an ME degree, I'm not sure any of us can point you in a direction. you can go into pretty much anything you want to go into.

All along the Atlantic coast, there's a lot of civilian Navy jobs, which means there are jobs in almost every major industry (HR, IT, real estate, construction, high tech, oil, logistics, finance).

rated:
OP, I don't quite understand your problem. You are still currently employed and you are updating your resume. why don't you just submit your resume to all the positions that require a ME degree in the southeast?

rated:
One thing to do, is max out your FSA selections next time you can, IF you think you will be leaving / let go early in the next plan year.

At most companies (I handle a lot of US Benefits finance for a fortune 50 company) you earn "access to" the full FSA amount once the plan year starts, but you pay for it evenly across your pay periods

So for example, if you take out $6000 for daycare, and leave in January (the first month of the plan year) you will have $6000 to pay for daycare throughout the year, but you will have only paid $500 (pre-tax) for this. IF you really think you will be gone, it makes sense to max this out

Where I work, the company does not try to reclaim these funds, since it tends to be a "wash" with funds forfeited by people that don't use everything they took out. So, it is 'free' money.

rated:
imbatman said:   if you're north of GA, then SC - there's also plenty of options in Charleston and Savannah.
If you can't figure out what sort of industry you can get into with an ME degree, I'm not sure any of us can point you in a direction. you can go into pretty much anything you want to go into.

 

  
No kidding.

Extreme SE of South Carolina would be an easy commute as a job-shopper at Gulfstream, assuming he has any functional CATIA experience.

rated:
Hi, Great comment about the FSA, however, I ahve an HSA here, and can't have both.

As for my reasoning/plan.

I'm a plan A, B, C guy.

Plan A is in effect.  Apply for everything I can find within a reasonable distance with a desire to not move.

Plan B Apply for everything further away with the idea I would work remotely, for months if need be, returning home on weekends, until I found somethign closer.  Also as a B, I'm interesting in exploring other industries such as finance or banking.  However, when I see any finance jobs posted, of course they want a finance degree, which I don't have.  I see the articles about how engineers are desired on other industries because of their technical and analytic skills, but I'm not sure the best approach to put my foot in one of those doors.  Looking for advice here.

Plan C:  Crap hits the fan, and I'm looking for ANY job that will keep us rolling without eating savings.  What might be some decent paying opportunities?  ie I didn't know pest control guys actually make decent money.  Job kind of sucks, but vs being unemployed, it would be ok.  Others?   Thinking about the RE license.  I've been thinking about that for a while.  Could pull the trigger and see how it goes.  I think about $600 will get me the prep course and the test and could have that finished in less than 1 month (while still looking and taking any parttime or whatever job.  thoughts? 

rated:
arch8ngel said:   
imbatman said:   if you're north of GA, then SC - there's also plenty of options in Charleston and Savannah.
If you can't figure out what sort of industry you can get into with an ME degree, I'm not sure any of us can point you in a direction. you can go into pretty much anything you want to go into.

 

  
No kidding.

Extreme SE of South Carolina would be an easy commute as a job-shopper at Gulfstream, assuming he has any functional CATIA experience.

  
I do not know what CATIA is, or Gulfstream....  googling now, but googling wont suddenly allow me to "have that experience".  

 

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SamuelLBronkowitz said:   One thing to do, is max out your FSA selections next time you can, IF you think you will be leaving / let go early in the next plan year.

At most companies (I handle a lot of US Benefits finance for a fortune 50 company) you earn "access to" the full FSA amount once the plan year starts, but you pay for it evenly across your pay periods

So for example, if you take out $6000 for daycare, and leave in January (the first month of the plan year) you will have $6000 to pay for daycare throughout the year, but you will have only paid $500 (pre-tax) for this. IF you really think you will be gone, it makes sense to max this out

Where I work, the company does not try to reclaim these funds, since it tends to be a "wash" with funds forfeited by people that don't use everything they took out. So, it is 'free' money.

  Dependent care FSAs are NOT prefunded:

http://www.thepreferredgroup.com/products-and-services/flexibile...

rated:
gulfstream - private jets
CATIA - CAD
there's more than modeling that goes into jets.
Being an HVAC guy, are you familiar with ASHRAE?
if so, are you familiar with ASHRAE 161 (http://www.techstreet.com/products/1571845)?

rated:
Scour your spending and find out where every dollar is going, and create a budget for when you are working and when you are not.

I know that my "not working" budget is nearly $10K less than my "working" budget. Figure out what can you cut, and what can you delay. A great example can be student loans, it might be possible to put them into deferment.

Another thing to consider is getting a HELOC if you own a home and have equity. Get it now while you have a job, in case you need to access the credit line for liquidity purposes.

rated:
imbatman said:   gulfstream - private jets
CATIA - CAD
there's more than modeling that goes into jets.
Being an HVAC guy, are you familiar with ASHRAE?
if so, are you familiar with ASHRAE 161 (http://www.techstreet.com/products/1571845)?

  I am familiar with ASHRAE.  Not 161.  I am very familiar with indoor air quality standards that govern and guide the IMC, IEC, and the IBC.

I could brush up on the airplane version.
I should figure out where Gulfstream is.  I'm not near the coast.

rated:
stanolshefski said:   Scour your spending and find out where every dollar is going, and create a budget for when you are working and when you are not.

I know that my "not working" budget is nearly $10K less than my "working" budget. Figure out what can you cut, and what can you delay. A great example can be student loans, it might be possible to put them into deferment.

Another thing to consider is getting a HELOC if you own a home and have equity. Get it now while you have a job, in case you need to access the credit line for liquidity purposes.

  
I have already been crunching the budget.
I can squeeze by on a minimum of 25% of my current take home without chewing savings.   Ideally, about 30% of current takehome will allow just a little breathing room.  I SHOULD be able to get something paying at least that much.

Kind of probing here for suggestions that maybe I havn't thought of looking into.

The HELOC is an interesting idea, but I'd really rather not go there unless I absolutely need to.  I wanna keep my house payment steady and keep feeding it till its paid off in another 11 years.  

rated:
RhizzleBop said:   Hi, Great comment about the FSA, however, I ahve an HSA here, and can't have both.

As for my reasoning/plan.

I'm a plan A, B, C guy.

Plan A is in effect.  Apply for everything I can find within a reasonable distance with a desire to not move.

Plan B Apply for everything further away with the idea I would work remotely, for months if need be, returning home on weekends, until I found somethign closer.  Also as a B, I'm interesting in exploring other industries such as finance or banking.  However, when I see any finance jobs posted, of course they want a finance degree, which I don't have.  I see the articles about how engineers are desired on other industries because of their technical and analytic skills, but I'm not sure the best approach to put my foot in one of those doors.  Looking for advice here.

Plan C:  Crap hits the fan, and I'm looking for ANY job that will keep us rolling without eating savings.  What might be some decent paying opportunities?  ie I didn't know pest control guys actually make decent money.  Job kind of sucks, but vs being unemployed, it would be ok.  Others?   Thinking about the RE license.  I've been thinking about that for a while.  Could pull the trigger and see how it goes.  I think about $600 will get me the prep course and the test and could have that finished in less than 1 month (while still looking and taking any parttime or whatever job.  thoughts? 

Edit: I guess it's more expensive in GA, http://www.groupon.com/deals/better-homes-and-gardens-real-estat... $199 for online course with 75 hours prelicencing so you can take the exam

rated:
RhizzleBop said:   
arch8ngel said:   
imbatman said:   if you're north of GA, then SC - there's also plenty of options in Charleston and Savannah.
If you can't figure out what sort of industry you can get into with an ME degree, I'm not sure any of us can point you in a direction. you can go into pretty much anything you want to go into.

 

  
No kidding.

Extreme SE of South Carolina would be an easy commute as a job-shopper at Gulfstream, assuming he has any functional CATIA experience.

  
I do not know what CATIA is, or Gulfstream....  googling now, but googling wont suddenly allow me to "have that experience".  

 

  
How long have you lived in that region that you have an engineering degree and have never heard of Gulfstream?

CATIA is Dassault's flavor of 3D modeling software, Gulfsteam uses it extensively for part design.
They have a large engineering workforce that does other things, too.

rated:
RhizzleBop said:   
 
I should figure out where Gulfstream is.  I'm not near the coast.

  It is in Savannah.

You clearly aren't "as far SE as you can be without being in FL" if you aren't near the coast

Sorry for the bad leads based on inaccurate vague mentions of geography

rated:
I meant, on a national scale, I'm SE, and north of Florida.
That still means 2-3 hours from the coastal areas.  

I checked Groupon and don't see the SC RE course on there.  

rated:
RhizzleBop said:   
stanolshefski said:   Scour your spending and find out where every dollar is going, and create a budget for when you are working and when you are not.

I know that my "not working" budget is nearly $10K less than my "working" budget. Figure out what can you cut, and what can you delay. A great example can be student loans, it might be possible to put them into deferment.

Another thing to consider is getting a HELOC if you own a home and have equity. Get it now while you have a job, in case you need to access the credit line for liquidity purposes.

  
I have already been crunching the budget.
I can squeeze by on a minimum of 25% of my current take home without chewing savings.   Ideally, about 30% of current takehome will allow just a little breathing room.  I SHOULD be able to get something paying at least that much.

Kind of probing here for suggestions that maybe I havn't thought of looking into.

The HELOC is an interesting idea, but I'd really rather not go there unless I absolutely need to.  I wanna keep my house payment steady and keep feeding it till its paid off in another 11 years.  

  
Have you calculated the amount of Unemployment you will receive, and the duration you can claim it?

rated:
OP you're making this way way harder than it is. You still have a job. Just put aside an hour a day to submitting applications and your resume to positions that require a degree in ME and are even remotely related to what you're doing.

rated:
Looks like in Georgia you will get $330 a week. So about $1320/month.

rated:
Is your job past saving? Doesn't sound like it. Sounds more like the company is just changing. Have they said anything about layoffs? Is the company losing money or something? Are they outsourcing stuff?

Being prepared for the worst is great but I'd focus on my job as priority #1.
Step 0 : continue to do your job well and whatever you can to keep from getting laid off.

rated:
RhizzleBop said:   
imbatman said:   gulfstream - private jets
CATIA - CAD
there's more than modeling that goes into jets.
Being an HVAC guy, are you familiar with ASHRAE?
if so, are you familiar with ASHRAE 161 (http://www.techstreet.com/products/1571845)?

  I am familiar with ASHRAE.  Not 161.  I am very familiar with indoor air quality standards that govern and guide the IMC, IEC, and the IBC.

I could brush up on the airplane version.
I should figure out where Gulfstream is.  I'm not near the coast.

  there's not a whole lot to brush up on the airplane version, it's actually a lot easier than IAQ in a building because it's a closed loop system (no worry about outside air). I was using it as an example of how HVAC guys are relevant in the airplane industry.

As for the comment about pest control - it's a racket. I could pay $45/month for mosquito control. Or I could spend $40 on everything I need to do mosquito control for 6 months. Say you got 6 neighbors to pay you for mosquito control @ $20/month. Each month would cost you $40 in equipment, and you'd make $80. Now scale that 10x. If you had 60 clients, you could 2/day and make $800/month.
Easier in population dense areas.



 

rated:
I'm a recruiter, and if you're an ME and not an MET I might be able to help connect you with opportunities in automotive sealing in the Detroit area.  Send me a PM please.

Meanwhile advice:

  • - Turn off or turn down all monthly expenditures you can possibly do without (Cable TV, drop to one phone, reduced internet speed, -i.e. all subscription payments).
  • - Sprinklers off if you're on city water, Stop TruGreen/Chemlawn visits
  • - Thermostat to a decent but maybe a little less comfy level (or off)
  • - DON'T plan to tap your 401k or IRAs (offlimits)
  • - Cancel that island vacation you'd planned
  • - Liquidate that junk in your basement on eBay. It'll be in the way if you move anyhow
  • - Kids: Bad news, we're in a tight spot.  Get a job at McDonald's and you are now responsible for all clothes that are not the basics.  Books (at least) if you're in college.
  • - Kids: You're gonna have to mow the lawn from now on, I've cancelled the lawn service
  • - AAACK! Do not borrow more.  That is the road to ruin

This is your mantra: "Money in Good; Money out Bad".  Hopefully everything will turn out better for you and you'll only end up accumulating a bunch of cash.  What a problem eh?
 

rated:
I don't know if anybody will agree with this or not but it wouldn't hurt to set aside some cash. I mean literally set it aside; don't flush it down the monthly bill toilet and especially not on debt service. Because if you end up unemployed, credit will quickly disappear. All of the space that you clear on your cards will be _gone_ (forget about any new borrowing) so you'll be scrambling if you need a few bucks for anything. The only exception that I would entertain is a debt that can be paid in full. But remember your aim is to survive until you're employed again.  To anyone thinking "pay your bills deadbeat," it will be harder to ultimately pay those bills if some knee-jerk reaction ends up destroying one's credit, hampering their ability to regain employment, rendering them homeless, or some combination of the three.

rated:
RhizzleBop said:   I meant, on a national scale, I'm SE, and north of Florida.
That still means 2-3 hours from the coastal areas.  

 

  I hope you can appreciate the confusion for those of us familiar with the region, since taking your initial post literally meant you probably lived in Brunswick GA and should be local to the Naval positions being discussed up-thread (and should have been close enough to Savannah to be familiar with Gulfstream, even if your post was to imply that you lived in Charleston)

 

rated:
RhizzleBop said:   
stanolshefski said:   Scour your spending and find out where every dollar is going, and create a budget for when you are working and when you are not.

I know that my "not working" budget is nearly $10K less than my "working" budget. Figure out what can you cut, and what can you delay. A great example can be student loans, it might be possible to put them into deferment.

Another thing to consider is getting a HELOC if you own a home and have equity. Get it now while you have a job, in case you need to access the credit line for liquidity purposes.

  
I have already been crunching the budget.
I can squeeze by on a minimum of 25% of my current take home without chewing savings.   Ideally, about 30% of current takehome will allow just a little breathing room.  I SHOULD be able to get something paying at least that much.

Kind of probing here for suggestions that maybe I havn't thought of looking into.

The HELOC is an interesting idea, but I'd really rather not go there unless I absolutely need to.  I wanna keep my house payment steady and keep feeding it till its paid off in another 11 years.  

  I completely understand your point. My point is that when you need the HELOC you won't be able to get it.

You can have an open HELOC and not draw it.

rated:
imbatman said:   
 
  there's not a whole lot to brush up on the airplane version, it's actually a lot easier than IAQ in a building because it's a closed loop system (no worry about outside air). I was using it as an example of how HVAC guys are relevant in the airplane industry.

 

  
Not sure why you would say that, unless you mean that the contaminant level of outside air at cruising altitude is less of an issue that just above street-level in a major city.

Modern aircraft pressurize and air-condition outside air to mix with recirculated cabin air.

rated:
arch8ngel said:   
RhizzleBop said:   I meant, on a national scale, I'm SE, and north of Florida.
That still means 2-3 hours from the coastal areas.  

 

  I hope you can appreciate the confusion for those of us familiar with the region, since taking your initial post literally meant you probably lived in Brunswick GA and should be local to the Naval positions being discussed up-thread (and should have been close enough to Savannah to be familiar with Gulfstream, even if your post was to imply that you lived in Charleston)

 

  I can certainly appreciate it.  I hope you all can appreciate me trying to gather info, without being extremely specific in my whereabouts as my skillset is already rather unique I think.

I like specific suggestions.  Also, I was looking for suggestions like, "yea, marketing companies look for engineer types to relate to product literature etc better", or I hear there are tons of jobs in this area in GA, or consider calling local banks and see if they will train an engineer to do  xxxxxx.   Will they?  I dunno, thought others might have knowledge or insight.

I'm in a city that doesn't have much in the way of manufacturing.  We do have a lot of banking, lending, finance, etc.  I really don't want to move. That would be somewhere down around plan D IF an extended layoff occured.

rated:
RhizzleBop said:   
arch8ngel said:   
RhizzleBop said:   I meant, on a national scale, I'm SE, and north of Florida.
That still means 2-3 hours from the coastal areas.  

 

  I hope you can appreciate the confusion for those of us familiar with the region, since taking your initial post literally meant you probably lived in Brunswick GA and should be local to the Naval positions being discussed up-thread (and should have been close enough to Savannah to be familiar with Gulfstream, even if your post was to imply that you lived in Charleston)

 

  I can certainly appreciate it.  I hope you all can appreciate me trying to gather info, without being extremely specific in my whereabouts as my skillset is already rather unique I think.

 

  Do you have a BS/MS in Mechanical Engineering? If you do, your skillset is transferrable.

rated:
I have a bachelors of science in mechanical engineering.  Not a masters.   Its not a 2 year tech degree.  Its from a 4 year accredited university.

Any thoughts on how to transfer it are appreciated.  I just feel as though blindly applying for completely other job types will not get results.  I am thinking I need an "angle" either on my resume, or by calling someone directly in certain positions. But again, advice or insight is welcome as I really don't know.  

I also don't know yet what UIB are here in SC or their duration.  I'll check into it.  As for debt, our only credit type debt is our house, my car, my student loans which are at an insanely good rate, and a chunk of what was my wife's student loans, rolled onto a 0% cc right now.   Here were at a stupidly high rate.  We paid off a bunch of hers, and rolled the rest onto a 0% cc.  In Nov I either need to pay it off, or roll to a new card.  My plan has been to roll them onto a slate in her name in later Oct (will be about 11K).

rated:
RhizzleBop said:   I just feel as though blindly applying for completely other job types will not get results.
 

  Don't think that You'd be surprised.

rated:
Claymore said:   ....  Meanwhile advice:

  • - Turn off or turn down all monthly expenditures you can possibly do without (Cable TV, drop to one phone, reduced internet speed, -i.e. all subscription payments).
  • - Sprinklers off if you're on city water, Stop TruGreen/Chemlawn visits
  • - Thermostat to a decent but maybe a little less comfy level (or off)
  • - DON'T plan to tap your 401k or IRAs (offlimits)
  • - Cancel that island vacation you'd planned
  • - Liquidate that junk in your basement on eBay. It'll be in the way if you move anyhow
  • - Kids: Bad news, we're in a tight spot.  Get a job at McDonald's and you are now responsible for all clothes that are not the basics.  Books (at least) if you're in college.
  • - Kids: You're gonna have to mow the lawn from now on, I've cancelled the lawn service
  • - AAACK! Do not borrow more.  That is the road to ruin

This is your mantra: "Money in Good; Money out Bad".  Hopefully everything will turn out better for you and you'll only end up accumulating a bunch of cash.  What a problem eh?

  Very, very good recommendations. Far too many individuals and families going through job transition ruin their financial future by yanking funds from 401(k)s or IRAs.  Not only does this trigger a surprisingly expensive taxable event.  401(k) and IRA withdrawals are classified as ordinary income (no preferential tax status), kicking your family into a HIGHER Federal and State income tax bracket at a time when you may not be able to afford it.  Unless you are age 59-1/2 or better, you will ALSO face a Federal 10% tax penalty ON TOP OF the income tax due.  To make matters even worse, although some tax withholding may be taken out, most Americans find the withholding amounts are not enough and they are forced to pay additional money to the IRS.  Equally significantly, you ultimately compromise your future retirement by yanking out your assets, because when you return to work and are able to resume saving and investment, the IRS rules DO NOT allow you to "reinstate" the contributions you've withdrawn from retirement plans.

Another risky decision which many displaced workers undertake which can "bite them in the behind" in the future, is withdrawing cash from a Home Equity Line of Credit (HELOC).  As your debt burden increases, unlike unsecured credit card debt, you ultimately are "putting your house on the line". 

One of the smartest decisions you can make, if you have a motor vehicle which you no longer need (particularly a late-model vehicle with high monthly payments), is SELL THE VEHICLE.  If you have payments, this will reduce pressure on your household cash flow.  Replace an expensive late-model car with a low-buck depreciated-out used car which you buy for CASH, keep it decently maintained and basically learn to "live on less".

If you have children who are grown-up adults or who are in college, this is the time for "tough love".  They can't demand that you continue subsidizing their schooling or other activities while your income level is sharply reduced - or nonexistent. 

Don't go deeper into debt on ANYTHING, with ONE and ONLY ONE exception:  Do whatever it takes to maintain health coverage or insurance.  Murphy's Law being what it is, the time when you or a family member will sustain a serious illness or injury is when you have NO health insurance.  "Saving" money by doing without health coverage is not worth incurring a financial nightmare.  When open enrollment for Obamacare comes to your state this fall - assuming you are still out of work - look into that option.

One last thought:  If you are laid off, be extremely cautious about signing a non-competition agreement (NCA) in exchange for a severance payout.  Contrary to urban legend, these are enforceable in most states other than California.  The last thing you want to be worried and anxious about is an NCA which interferes with your ability to find a new job.  Oral representations by people in HR at your old company, or by former bosses, are not enforceable in court, what's written on paper and signed by the parties is what counts.  Do you really want to have to hire a lawyer to defend you when your new "dream job" is offered to you?  You CAN negotiate NCAs and other terms of departure, don't hesitate to make your former employer have to sweat a bit if they want to get rid of you.



If you genuinely are desperate for money

rated:
jerosen said:   Is your job past saving? Doesn't sound like it. Sounds more like the company is just changing. Have they said anything about layoffs? Is the company losing money or something? Are they outsourcing stuff?

Being prepared for the worst is great but I'd focus on my job as priority #1.
Step 0 : continue to do your job well and whatever you can to keep from getting laid off.

I agree with this 100%, mostly because I've been there. Change is scary, but for in the meantime, keep your head up and do your best to stay productive and engaged in your workplace.

However, I would recommend starting to put together job hunting resources, even if it is just looking at the Classified's in the paper each morning. 

rated:
SeattleNative said:   
 When open enrollment for Obamacare comes to your state this fall - assuming you are still out of work - look into that option.

 

  
Shouldn't have to wait till the fall.   Losing coverage due to job loss is a qualifying event that allows you to enroll in coverage outside of open enrollment.


 

Skipping 61 Messages...
rated:
RhizzleBop said:   
rufflesinc said:   OP, seriously, just start applying for jobs. Cmon. Not that hard.
 I am doing just that already.   

Again, it's all about plan A, B, C, and even D

  Do you also have a bomb shelter in your backyard?

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