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I want to buy some family members stock certificates for items that they enjoy, like Microsoft, Coca Cola, Budweiser, etc... More as a keepsake than an investment.

Has anyone used OneShare.com to do so? Their charges end up being 2-3x the price of a share of stock, which seems very high. It'd be a great discussion here if anyone knows of any online brokers that don't charge an arm and a leg to issue a paper certificate. Is there any better way to buy them without having to pay for a frame, transfer fee, etc?

Also, am I correct in assuming that even having just one share will that entitle the recipient to get the annual report, and in the case of Wrigley's, the free gift pack that gets mailed every year?

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Archived thread on same topic:

One share of Stock

expert5186 said: [Q]I want to buy some family members stock certificates for items that they enjoy, like Microsoft, Coca Cola, Budweiser, etc... More as a keepsake than an investment.


Why not buy them nice products from these companies instead of paying 2 or 3 times the price of the stock for a piece of paper?
This says nothing about investing.

Or better yet, tell them you'll help them open Emigrant accounts and maybe you can save the money (that you would use to buy the stock certificates) and instead start them off with a nice deposit?

opps meant to edit existing post instead of making another one

Archived thread on same topic:

One share of Stock


[Q]Also, am I correct in assuming that even having just one share will that entitle the recipient to get the annual report, and in the case of Wrigley's, the free gift pack that gets mailed every year? You are correct. For Wrigley's and some of the others, you do have to have the shares registered in your name (as opposed to your broker's name). Discussion here - Shareholder freebies.

this isn't meant as an investment since even with cheaper fees than OneShare they immediately lose big $$ due to transfer costs and issuance costs. You wouldn't frame an email saying that you funded someone's 529 plan, etc. Very likely even if the stock doubled or split you'd wouldn't gain much from breaking open a frame, mailing it in for redemption, and likely paying lots more fees to convert the paper certificate into $$.

Plus when you're bound by your spouse to buy something material for family members for a birthday or xmas, I thought a stock certificate would be a really neat and unique gift. Who knows, it could help to give them pride that they actually own stock. With children it could help to get them interested in financial matters too.

Go to Moneyfactory and buy uncut currency. It's cheaper and just as cool, if not more so.

You always have the right to request from your broker to get stock certificates of any shares you own. To sell it, you'd have to return it to the broker (which is not applicable in your case). You'd just have to pay the commission to buy the stock and any reasonable & customary fees for the transfer and delivery of certificates. It'd be much cheaper than OneShare of course. If it wasn't, then OneShare wouldn't be doing the business

expert5186 said: [Q]this isn't meant as an investment since even with cheaper fees than OneShare they immediately lose big $$ due to transfer costs and issuance costs. You wouldn't frame an email saying that you funded someone's 529 plan, etc. Very likely even if the stock doubled or split you'd wouldn't gain much from breaking open a frame, mailing it in for redemption, and likely paying lots more fees to convert the paper certificate into $$.

Plus when you're bound by your spouse to buy something material for family members for a birthday or xmas, I thought a stock certificate would be a really neat and unique gift. Who knows, it could help to give them pride that they actually own stock. With children it could help to get them interested in financial matters too.like you said above, do it for a company that sends annual freebies.

otherwise I think uncut money or a Proof coin set would be cooler. a physical certificate really is useless

lars23 said: [Q]You always have the right to request from your broker to get stock certificates of any shares you own. To sell it, you'd have to return it to the broker (which is not applicable in your case). You'd just have to pay the commission to buy the stock and any reasonable & customary fees for the transfer and delivery of certificates. It'd be much cheaper than OneShare of course. If it wasn't, then OneShare wouldn't be doing the businessIt's not exactly going to be MUCH cheaper, or any cheaper at all. First, you have to pay a purchase commission, say ten bucks. Then you may have to pay a fee to transfer the share into another person's name, say another ten bucks. Then you have to pay to have a certificate issued, at least another twenty-five bucks. Already you are looking at forty-five bucks. OneShare charges $39. Now if you already owned say, a hundred shares of Harley Davidson, and you wanted to spin off a single share as a gift, you might be able to do it for a little less, but it is still going to be pricey.

I read somewhere a long time ago that people who owned one share of say "Disney" got a discount at the parks, and if you owned one share of General Mills you got discounts at Red Lobster. There were some others but I can't remember them. Does anyone know if this is still true?

check the freebies thread dcwilbur linked above

expert5186 said: [Q]I want to buy some family members stock certificates for items that they enjoy, like Microsoft, Coca Cola, Budweiser, etc... More as a keepsake than an investment.

It'd be a great discussion here if anyone knows of any online brokers that don't charge an arm and a leg to issue a paper certificate. Is there any better way to buy them without having to pay for a frame, transfer fee, etc?

Also, am I correct in assuming that even having just one share will that entitle the recipient to get the annual report, and in the case of Wrigley's, the free gift pack that gets mailed every year?

Rather than try to talk you out of this idea, which is not why you posted this thread, I will answer your questions.

I haven't used OneShare, but E-trade and Ameritrade charge $40 per stock certificate request. This is in addition to the brokerage fee you would pay to buy the one share ($15/$11). This might be an option for you as well.

And yes, any number of shares will entitle you to shareholder freebies.


I use http://www.siebertnet.com/ when I want to get one share to start a companies Dividend Reinvestment Program.

It's $14.95 per trade but free to register and ship. I just did it with DOW.

I have an account at Sharebuilder and bought 1 share of Playboy for my father then paid their reasonable fee to change thhe name and have a share printed

shadow1woman said: [Q]I read somewhere a long time ago that people who owned one share of say "Disney" got a discount at the parks, and if you owned one share of General Mills you got discounts at Red Lobster. There were some others but I can't remember them. Does anyone know if this is still true?

When I see my gen mills rep next time ill ask him, but I dont think red lobster has any corporate connection unless its a promo thing.

hmm hopefully you can find this cheapishly, this looks like a nice collectors item and sutffs

Red Lobster is not part of General Mills but Darden Restaurants (DRI). I think it may have been a spinout of GIS many years ago.

paydirt said: [Q]Red Lobster is not part of General Mills but Darden Restaurants (DRI). I think it may have been a spinout of GIS many years ago.

Like I said been a long time ago that I read this. Don't have any idea if it would even apply today. That is why I posted it reading OP post made me think of it and I thought someone else may know if it would still hold true.



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