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I'm wondering on the legalities of signing someone else's credit card. I gave authorization for a friend to sign for a service for which I could not be present. (Not an authorized user on the card. Is this legal, and furthermore is it legal for the credit card to accept someone else's signature?
Thank you.

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When I opened my first checking account, I signed my name in CHINESE. Since then I have been writing/signing checks in E... (more)

wshtb (Dec. 01, 2006 @ 3:36p) |

Oakley087 said: <blockquote><hr>My boss always gives me his personal CC for office purchases... of all things to get car... (more)

delzy (Dec. 01, 2006 @ 3:59p) |

delzy said: <blockquote><hr>Oakley087 said: <blockquote><hr>My boss always gives me his personal CC for office purchases... (more)

Oakley087 (Dec. 04, 2006 @ 12:39p) |

http://usa.visa.com/download/business/accepting_visa/ops_risk_management/rules_for_visa_merchants.pdf

Some customers write “See ID” or “Ask for ID” in the signature panel, thinking that this is a deterrent against fraud or forgery; that is, if their signature is noton the card, a fraudster will not be able to forge it . In reality, criminals don’t take the time to practice signatures: they use cards as quickly as possible after a theft and prior to the accounts being blocked . They are actually counting on you not to look at the back of the card and compare signatures—they may even have access to counterfeit identification with a signature in their own handwriting.

“See ID” or “Ask for ID” is not a valid substitute for a signature . The customer must sign the card in your presence, as stated above.

What did we learn today? Sign your card.
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Do they even check ID's? I normally sign complete gibberish.

The correct method to handle this situation is to write a limited power of attorney for the exact action you want performed. This is legal and binding although IANAFDBL.

Someone hasn't read about the zug credit card prank. If you give authorization, the signature is legit. Why do people always ask the "is this legal" crap. Yes, it is.

it also depends if the merchant or cashier is willing to take it with a different signature. we all know that most don't even look to check the signature, but I was at a Macy's a couple of weeks ago where the cashier checked. the woman in front of me had her husband's cc on which she was not an authorized user. the cashier wouldn't take it after checking teh name even though the woman called her husband (course we don't know if that was really him) and had him authorize it verbally. still wasn't accepted.

I usually write jibberish or "Stinky" or something...

I usually "write" smily faces and nobody cares..

codename47 said: [Q]Someone hasn't read about the zug credit card prank. If you give authorization, the signature is legit. Why do people always ask the "is this legal" crap. Yes, it is.



ZUG CREDIT CARD PRANK

NukeMedDude said: [Q]codename47 said: [Q]Someone hasn't read about the zug credit card prank. If you give authorization, the signature is legit. Why do people always ask the "is this legal" crap. Yes, it is.ZUG CREDIT CARD PRANKThat was fun! Thanks for the link!

Five years ago, I doubt your card issuers would have raised an eyebrow.

Due to the massive increase in payment-card fraud, there is a remote chance that your card issuer's fraud-detection measures might raise red flags about this. At face value, the card issuer may warn you that "outsourcing" your signing authority to a third party violates your cardholder agreement.

Although very unlikely, the worst-case scenario is that the card issuer (treating the irregular signature as a "fraud" risk) could cancel your account and report derogatory information to your credit report.

When I have disputed items in the past, they always ask if I authorized the transaction.

wife always has my Nordstrom visa and i also sign for the food delivery service.

never been questioned.

ZUG CREDIT CARD PRANK

Signing I believe is almost optional. I've ordered online loads of things. Where do I sign? Those little signing screens at the checkouts at many supermarkets and stores are worthless. My signature on those things always look like I was trying to sign holding the wand/pen with my foot.

At fast food restaurants, it's often just swipe-and-go. No signature required.

I remember once signing a receipt at JC Penney with the name "Al Capone." The sales clerks are too busy even to care. As long as it is you, or someone you authorized to use the card, you're responsible for the charge, no matter what you signed on the slip.

My friend writes "See Photo ID" on the back of his credit cards. When he signs the credit card bill at the store, they verify his signature and photo with his driver's license. No problem 99% of the time, I'm sure it's just a glance anyway.

One clerk refused to accept the credit card because it didn't have his signature. He gave up trying to explain it (thought she was being scammed?), so he crossed out his real signature on the bill, and signed it as "See Photo ID". Then she said, "I can't accept that, that's not your real signature"

He took great delight in saying "yes it is, look at the back of my card"



i always write RTS

RTS = REFUSE TO SIGN


bjamm said: [Q]i always write RTS

RTS = REFUSE TO SIGN

Lol, even if u write "refuse to sign" on it, they won't care unless it's a large purchase. Also, write "Please check id" in large words in the back does help. Cashier check my ID every time because of it (hopefully not because I look like a criminal <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-happy.gif" border=0> <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-tongue.gif" border=0> ).

FredFrugal said: [Q]My friend writes "See Photo ID" on the back of his credit cards. When he signs the credit card bill at the store, they verify his signature and photo with his driver's license. No problem 99% of the time, I'm sure it's just a glance anyway.

One clerk refused to accept the credit card because it didn't have his signature. He gave up trying to explain it (thought she was being scammed?), so he crossed out his real signature on the bill, and signed it as "See Photo ID". Then she said, "I can't accept that, that's not your real signature"

He took great delight in saying "yes it is, look at the back of my card"

The card is supposed to be signed so that it shows you accept the terms and conditions. The post office will not take a card without the signature.

heck, one of my friends drew a house, sunshine, birds, and wrote "this could be you!" on the reciept where he is supposed to sign at a restaraunt. The lady looked at it, said "Hmm?" and put it in the drawer.

burgerwars said: [Q]ZUG CREDIT CARD PRANK

Signing I believe is almost optional. I've ordered online loads of things. Where do I sign? Those little signing screens at the checkouts at many supermarkets and stores are worthless. My signature on those things always look like I was trying to sign holding the wand/pen with my foot.

At fast food restaurants, it's often just swipe-and-go. No signature required.

I remember once signing a receipt at JC Penney with the name "Al Capone." The sales clerks are too busy even to care. As long as it is you, or someone you authorized to use the card, you're responsible for the charge, no matter what you signed on the slip.

Signing is not optional. It is technically a contract between you and the credit card company that you will pay the CC and the CC will pay the retailer. Without a signature, technically, you can dispute the charge and win (and technically, that would be fraud too).

CC companies just recently allowed certain number of establishments (mostly fast food) to make charges without a signature.

A couple interesting things I've found in the MasterCard Manual:
[Q]2.1.2.4 Reporting a Suspicious Transaction
To report a suspicious transaction, the card acceptor must contact the
authorization center, state “This is a Code Ten” and await instructions.
Members in regions other than the U.S. region may adopt a term other than
Code Ten for use when a card acceptor is suspicious, subject to the
Corporation’s approval.

[Q]If a card acceptor obtained an authorization for a transaction, and the cardholder adds a gratuity in an amount greater than 20% of the transaction amount then
The card acceptor must obtain an authorization for the additional amount. The issuer is responsible for the full amount of the transaction
Interesting. So it would be a little more difficult if a waiter were to cheat and add additional gratuity beyond 20%.

[Q]2.1.6.3.2 Discrepancy Between Signatures
If the card acceptor believes that the signature on the card does not match the
signature on the TID, the card acceptor must contact the acquirer for
instructions. The signature would not match if the signature panel were
signed “Jan H. Hanley” and the sales receipt “Bob Hanley” or “F. Hanley.” The
signature would be acceptable if signed “Jan H. Hanley,” “J. H. Hanley” or “Jan
Hanley.” The signature would be acceptable if a title such as Mr., Mrs., or Dr.
is missing or is included.

2.1.6.3.3 Signature Not Required
Transactions based on mail orders, phone orders, preauthorized orders,
electronic commerce orders, MasterCard Guaranteed Reservations, Advanced
Resort Deposits and Express Checkouts may be completed without the
cardholder’s signature. The card acceptor must type or legibly print on the
signature line of the TID the letters “TO”, “MO”, “PO”, “EC”, “Guaranteed
Reservation/No Show,” “Signature on File – Express Check-out,” or “Advance
Deposit” as appropriate. The card acceptor must retain and make available to
the acquirer upon request the cardholder’s written request to the card acceptor
for preauthorization. The card acceptor must not deliver goods or perform
services covered by a preauthorization after receiving notification that the
preauthorization is canceled or that the MasterCard card covered by the
preauthorization is not to be honored.

burgerwars said: [Q]ZUG CREDIT CARD PRANK

Signing I believe is almost optional. I've ordered online loads of things. Where do I sign? Those little signing screens at the checkouts at many supermarkets and stores are worthless. My signature on those things always look like I was trying to sign holding the wand/pen with my foot.

At fast food restaurants, it's often just swipe-and-go. No signature required.

I remember once signing a receipt at JC Penney with the name "Al Capone." The sales clerks are too busy even to care. As long as it is you, or someone you authorized to use the card, you're responsible for the charge, no matter what you signed on the slip.

I set up a merchant account for a business once (a few years ago). The credit card companies charge slightly higher fees when a receipt is not signed or a card is manually keyed in (fee to the merchant). Lately I've been noticing that many places (7-11, grocery stores, fast food) do not require signature on amounts under $25 - this is probably a change in the merchant's agreement with the CC company.

Legally (morally) if you agreed to/authorized the charge (no matter how you did it - and you tell the truth about it) - it is a valid charge.

I have taken my friend's car (he's out of town) to BWM for service and handed them a Post-It with his credit card number and expiration date. They did not even blink. (They also did not ask me for any ID or proof of ownership to pick up the car!)

Another thing that some here might be interested in; when paying by debit card and they give you the "debit or credit" option, always select credit. My bank told me that when making purchases with the debit card you should never have to enter a PIN (meaning the merchant has treated it as a debit transaction) unless you need CashBack. If you use it as a "credit" transaction, the merchant must pay the transaction fee charged by the credit card company. If you select debit your financial institution must pay the transaction fee (a percentage of the total charged) and will pass the charges onto you (my bank charges $1 for each debit transaction, while nothing is charged for a "credit" transaction).

MeerkatRN said: [Q]I'm wondering on the legalities of signing someone else's credit card. I gave authorization for a friend to sign for a service for which I could not be present. (Not an authorized user on the card. Is this legal, and furthermore is it legal for the credit card to accept someone else's signature?
Thank you.

It's not technically legal/acceptable, but that probably won't matter. A few years ago I had to run over a dozen errands for a disabled relative. He gave me his card and I just used it wherever I needed to get things for him (hardware store, furniture, prescription drugs, you name it). He and I didn't even have the same last name, but it didn't matter - one cashier even asked for my ID, pretended to look at it (or just looked at the picture), then continued with the transaction as if the names had matched.

Also, similar to the Zug prank, about 4-5 years ago I signed all of my credit card receipts for a while with silly things (usually Abraham Lincoln, but eventually moving up to "HONEST ABE" LINCOLN - like that, in all caps, with the quotes). Finally, after about a year of doing this, a cashier finally said "Allright Abe, let's try it again" and handed me a new receipt to sign - I made sure to let her manager know that she was the first cashier to notice.

Nowadays I usually just draw a quick single horizontal line where the signature should be - why expend the extra effort to write my signature if no one cares?

holly90000 said: [Q]Another thing that some here might be interested in; when paying by debit card and they give you the "debit or credit" option, always select credit. My bank told me that when making purchases with the debit card you should never have to enter a PIN (meaning the merchant has treated it as a debit transaction) unless you need CashBack. If you use it as a "credit" transaction, the merchant must pay the transaction fee charged by the credit card company. If you select debit your financial institution must pay the transaction fee (a percentage of the total charged) and will pass the charges onto you (my bank charges $1 for each debit transaction, while nothing is charged for a "credit" transaction).

What bank is this? I didn't know there are banks that levy fees to use their debit cards. I rarely use my debit cards but have never been charged any fees because I chose "debit" and punched in my PIN instead of signing ("credit" transaction) for my purchases. I know that Citibank will give you fewer ThankYou Points if you use a PIN instead of signing on debit transactions but there's no additional fee assessed. And WaMu will even pay you a $.03 reward for each debit purchase transaction (up to $250 per year) in their Free Checking Account.

mh83 said: [Q]holly90000 said: [Q]Another thing that some here might be interested in; when paying by debit card and they give you the "debit or credit" option, always select credit. My bank told me that when making purchases with the debit card you should never have to enter a PIN (meaning the merchant has treated it as a debit transaction) unless you need CashBack. If you use it as a "credit" transaction, the merchant must pay the transaction fee charged by the credit card company. If you select debit your financial institution must pay the transaction fee (a percentage of the total charged) and will pass the charges onto you (my bank charges $1 for each debit transaction, while nothing is charged for a "credit" transaction).

What bank is this? I didn't know there are banks that levy fees to use their debit cards. I rarely use my debit cards but have never been charged any fees because I chose "debit" and punched in my PIN instead of signing ("credit" transaction) for my purchases. I know that Citibank will give you fewer ThankYou Points if you use a PIN instead of signing on debit transactions but there's no additional fee assessed. And WaMu will even pay you a $.03 reward for each debit purchase transaction (up to $250 per year) in their Free Checking Account.

It's a Federal Credit Union.

FredFrugal said: [Q]One clerk refused to accept the credit card because it didn't have his signature. He gave up trying to explain it (thought she was being scammed?), so he crossed out his real signature on the bill, and signed it as "See Photo ID". Then she said, "I can't accept that, that's not your real signature"

He took great delight in saying "yes it is, look at the back of my card"The clerk is supposed to check the signature on a newly signed credit card against the signature on the driver's license. Unless he also signed "See Photo ID" on the DL, the clerk should reject the transaction.

I used to work at Macys, and we were supposed to check the signatures. If the signatures weren't the same, you had to ask for ID. We were supposed to encourage people to sign their cards. You wouldn't believe how many people told us that they left their card unsigned because they wanted us to ask for ID. I would tell them that if someone stole their card and signed the back of it, the signatures would match up so we wouldn't ever ask for ID. I think it was above their heads...

SIGN YOUR CARDS! It's not completely safe, but it is a safer option.

My mother in law (now 86), hates to shop.

Starting well over 10 years ago, everytime we come to visit, she hands us her credit card to make purchases for her.

We ave bought tires & batteries for her car (installed at Sears), groceries, many things at WM,........

NEVER once in all this time have we been challenged.

... it pays to look honest <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-smile.gif" border=0>

Now at my local wholefoods they don't even need a signature for under 25 dollars... Just like in Chipoltle or Starbucks. It seems about right to me that a theif will not steal a card and then buy a burrito but is this opening the company to more claims against the cards or just common sense as I stated above?

My boss always gives me his personal CC for office purchases... of all things to get carded for, I got carded for a 1.99 energy drink at the gas station. I told her I didn't have my ID, so she just asked me how to spell the last name on the card.

When I opened my first checking account, I signed my name in CHINESE. Since then I have been writing/signing checks in ENGLISH. Recipients of my checks never had problem.

At my local grocery stores, they all use LCD touch-screen signature panel. It is impossible to sign properly. The printed result on my receipt is beyond gibberish. Never had problem with it either.

So I guess they don't care.

Oakley087 said: [Q]My boss always gives me his personal CC for office purchases... of all things to get carded for, I got carded for a 1.99 energy drink at the gas station. I told her I didn't have my ID, so she just asked me how to spell the last name on the card.
WTF would you be buying a $1.99 energy drink at a gas station on your bosses CC? This must be the most stupid thing I've ever heard.

delzy said: [Q]Oakley087 said: [Q]My boss always gives me his personal CC for office purchases... of all things to get carded for, I got carded for a 1.99 energy drink at the gas station. I told her I didn't have my ID, so she just asked me how to spell the last name on the card.
WTF would you be buying a $1.99 energy drink at a gas station on your bosses CC? This must be the most stupid thing I've ever heard.

Very small company... boss owed me lunch, had me buy for us and another employee, other employee and I got energy drinks? Total was $3.98 or something, not $1.99, my bad.



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