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I'm sure they use the basket for the tare (base weight, used to calibrate "zero" on the scale).

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I’m considering getting a keypad deadbolt lock. When walking out of the house, push a button and the door locks. When going in the house key in 4 numbers and the lock opens.

Figure this will save at minimum, 20 to 60 seconds each day. On occasion, this type of lock can save hours because I will never have to make a special trip to unlock the door.

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bmcgin said: I’m considering getting a keypad deadbolt lock. When walking out of the house, push a button and the door locks. When going in the house key in 4 numbers and the lock opens.

Figure this will save at minimum, 20 to 60 seconds each day. On occasion, this type of lock can save hours because I will never have to make a special trip to unlock the door.


I have one of these for my garage. It is very useful. More than 20/60 each day... it saves a lot of time in the long run (time you would have spent occasionally searching for misplaced keys) and the added convenience of just carrying your car keys.

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By the same token, intelligent key systems such as Nissan/Infiniti offer for cars are a real convenience. If the key is in your pocket, a button on the door handle unlocks the door, and you just turn a switch in the dash without having to insert the key.

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vkva said: bmcgin said: I’m considering getting a keypad deadbolt lock. When walking out of the house, push a button and the door locks. When going in the house key in 4 numbers and the lock opens.

Figure this will save at minimum, 20 to 60 seconds each day. On occasion, this type of lock can save hours because I will never have to make a special trip to unlock the door.


I have one of these for my garage. It is very useful. More than 20/60 each day... it saves a lot of time in the long run (time you would have spent occasionally searching for misplaced keys) and the added convenience of just carrying your car keys.


Had one of these on the front door for many years when I lived back home with my parents. Definite time saver. And no issues with having keys available, making copies of keys, etc. And the door is locked 100% of the time because you use the code to open it every time. Even better are the ones today that allow you to change the key code on the fly. If you have a contractor coming over to do some service, you can give them a key code for the day and disable it the next.

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I did some research on keyless locks and ended up getting a deadbolt from Morning Industry that uses a little infrared remote to lock and unlock the door. It worked pretty well, but you do have to change the batteries around once a year or so. It does save you a few seconds and it's nice when you're carrying groceries. If you're trying to save time, a lock with a remote is much quicker than entering a code on a keypad (but they have a lock that has a keypad too if you want that).

For my new house, instead I went with Turner Deadbolts. I love these. They work just like regular deadbolts, but you can lock them from the outside by twisting the lock with your hand (no key needed to lock). It's a great time saver. Just be careful not to lock your keys inside.

Oh yeah, and I don't know if anyone has mentioned this one, but buy a Roomba. Best thing I ever bought. Works amazingly well and saves a *ton* of time. If you really want, you can even get one of the fancy ones with a scheduler so it will run automatically once a day or whatever.

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We have a major remodel planned in September, so I’ve been holding off buying the lock. I did buy a new door; it’s a 2” thick steel door that weighs 1100 pounds. I found it eBay, could not pass up the price. The only lock I can find that works with a 2” thick door is made by Kwikset...guess this will do it.

The robot floor cleaner looks great. Do they work on rugs or only hardwood floors and tile?

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bmcgin said: We have a major remodel planned in September, so I’ve been holding off buying the lock. I did buy a new door; it’s a 2” thick steel door that weighs 1100 pounds. I found it eBay, could not pass up the price. The only lock I can find that works with a 2” thick door is made by Kwikset...guess this will do it.

The robot floor cleaner looks great. Do they work on rugs or only hardwood floors and tile?


2" thick steel door? WTF? How good of a deal was it (shipping alone would be several hundred, I would think)? How the hell are you gonna get that installed? Would ordinary door hinges even be strong enough? Have you considered how hard it will be to just open and close the door? Hell, it would probably be easier for a crook to dig a hole through the wall than to get through that door.

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I am lucky it is only 2” thick, usually this manufacturer only makes 2 3/8” thick. It has 4 industrial ball bearing hinges for smooth operation. The iron is 12 gauge steel which is very thick.

The manufacturer built a handful of these doors for a special order. Then the client realized he measured 4 wrong, so he lost his 50% deposit on these 4 doors. Because the doors are a few inches wider than a standard 6’ x 8’ door, the manufacturer is having a hard time reselling them. Usually this door sells complete with handles for $4000 plus shipping. I was able to buy it complete with handles and shipped to my home for $2000 no tax. This is less than a nice Home Depot door made out of fiberglass, which was my fallback plan.

We are converting a duplex into a single family home. The entry will be reframed, re-stuccoed and painted. Stairs and a portion of the center firewall are being removed. New hardwood floor is going in the living room. The remodel run between $8-12k depending on a few things. The door will take 3 or 4 men to set into place.

After remodel, the house’s value will gain by $200k. Our area is fairly non-standard. We live Panama City Beach where there is high demand for short term rentals. Even though we are not renting, much of the house’s value is determined by how well it can rent. In the last few years, many nice high rise were built and the 2 bed / 2 bath market is now flooded. So because each side of the our duplex is a 2/2, making it into a single family with 4 or 5 bedrooms and 6 bathrooms adds much value.

Here’s a picture of the door incase you’d like to see it: click here

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Selling something on eBay for a small profit.
Unless you aim to sell gazillion such items, I find it a complete waste of time/effort/resources to sell on eBay.
Problem is, even if you spend your time/effort/resources and manage to sell something you might still end up with a SNAD claim with so many scammers out there that you will end up with nothing but the grief.

I stopped after my second SNAD claim and instead just donated all the items to local school/church/charity etc.
Sure I lost few hundred $$'s but gained some peace of mind and a LOT of time and it felt good as my things went to some needy people instead of scammers (not to mention the Tax advantage)!

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I never tried eBay, but was considering hiring someone to manage a yard sale to get rid of lots of things--furniture, nice items, never used things, junk, etc.(see 4/28 post). Then noticed a newspaper ad about a consignment store who picks up. Went out to visit (to see quality and type of product they sold) and made an appointment for them to come here. They don't take clothes/junk (but there are other consigments or places to donate), but I plan to load my basement with every single thing I want out. They can pick and choose--best yet, they can load it up and haul it away (my least favorite part of getting things out is actually physically packing them up, making a list to use for deductions, and hauling somewhere). Their deal is no up-front/registration fee, you get 60% of price if it sells in 60 days, 50% between 60-90, then you can sign to consign again. Can't beat that!! BTW, I still think yard sale manager is good idea, but more work for me--perhaps less money as well? The consignment owner (biased of course) said I'd make more money this way. Hope so. PS--Assume SNAD means you don't get money? What does it stand for?

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Gertrude23 said: I never tried eBay, but was considering hiring someone to manage a yard sale to get rid of lots of things--furniture, nice items, never used things, junk, etc.(see 4/28 post). Then noticed a newspaper ad about a consignment store who picks up. Went out to visit (to see quality and type of product they sold) and made an appointment for them to come here. They don't take clothes/junk (but there are other consigments or places to donate), but I plan to load my basement with every single thing I want out. They can pick and choose--best yet, they can load it up and haul it away (my least favorite part of getting things out is actually physically packing them up, making a list to use for deductions, and hauling somewhere). Their deal is no up-front/registration fee, you get 60% of price if it sells in 60 days, 50% between 60-90, then you can sign to consign again. Can't beat that!! BTW, I still think yard sale manager is good idea, but more work for me--perhaps less money as well? The consignment owner (biased of course) said I'd make more money this way. Hope so. PS--Assume SNAD means you don't get money? What does it stand for?
Thanks for your input. I will try that out.

SNAD=Significantly not as described. Scammers typically buy the item from you and then claim that it was not as described in the listing. For example one of the buyers claimed that there was no CD found in a factory sealed box of a software. Another one claimed that the printer sold was not new as described. Paypal will just refund the money to the buyer despite any evidence you provide to the contrary and there is no way you can prove that the buyer is scamming you.

You can read about it here among numerous such thread on FW.

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Dus10 said: I disagree with paying to have oil changed. I can change my oil in about 30 minutes, and I buy and dispose of it on my way to other places. It takes longer than half an hour to pay to have my oil changed, unless I am paying someone to take my car to have the oil changed. Plus, I know it is being done properly.Here's an even better idea for saving money and time on oil changes: Don't do them. The vast majority of people don't keep a car long enuf for potential damage due to old oil to make any difference anyway. Add oil as needed, sell the car in a few years. Rinse, repeat.

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kenblakely said: Dus10 said: I disagree with paying to have oil changed. I can change my oil in about 30 minutes, and I buy and dispose of it on my way to other places. It takes longer than half an hour to pay to have my oil changed, unless I am paying someone to take my car to have the oil changed. Plus, I know it is being done properly.Here's an even better idea for saving money and time on oil changes: Don't do them. The vast majority of people don't keep a car long enuf for potential damage due to old oil to make any difference anyway. Add oil as needed, sell the car in a few years. Rinse, repeat.

Time and money savings outweighed by having to live with the fact that you're an a-hole, though.

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ShakuniMama said: Selling something on eBay for a small profit.
Unless you aim to sell gazillion such items, I find it a complete waste of time/effort/resources to sell on eBay.
Problem is, even if you spend your time/effort/resources and manage to sell something you might still end up with a SNAD claim with so many scammers out there that you will end up with nothing but the grief.

I stopped after my second SNAD claim and instead just donated all the items to local school/church/charity etc.
Sure I lost few hundred $$'s but gained some peace of mind and a LOT of time and it felt good as my things went to some needy people instead of scammers (not to mention the Tax advantage)!
how do you go about finding appropriate charities? i'd love to unload all these copies of peachtree pro for a $140 tax deduction :p

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I searched but didn't see anyone posting this suggestion, remote starters for cars, every since I got them installed on my cars I noticed I don't have to worry about waiting for the cars to warm up.

Particularly useful as one of them also allows to handle trunk opener. After shopping just have the cars already warmed up and if carrying any heavy bags have the trunk already opened to just dump the bags and drive off. Now that car has become the defacto shopping/grocery car. Bonus I noticed that my remote signal is strong enough to start from my 3rd floor office space, so by the time I got my laptop and papers ready to go my car is also ready to get in and drive off.

Another item is getting those 5 button mouse for the computer, the software included allows the additional buttons to be configured so that most common tasks like cut/copy or anything you want it to be assigned (even basic macro's). for e.g. The Microsoft mouse I use is configurable to program specific functions so I configured couple of the buttons to respond to any email without needing to take the pointer and hit on reply. They look jazy with many people commenting on them but I find it a big time saver.

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sin94 said: I searched but didn't see anyone posting this suggestion, remote starters for cars, every since I got them installed on my cars I noticed I don't have to worry about waiting for the cars to warm up.

Particularly useful as one of them also allows to handle trunk opener. After shopping just have the cars already warmed up and if carrying any heavy bags have the trunk already opened to just dump the bags and drive off. Now that car has become the defacto shopping/grocery car. Bonus I noticed that my remote signal is strong enough to start from my 3rd floor office space, so by the time I got my laptop and papers ready to go my car is also ready to get in and drive off.

Another item is getting those 5 button mouse for the computer, the software included allows the additional buttons to be configured so that most common tasks like cut/copy or anything you want it to be assigned (even basic macro's). for e.g. The Microsoft mouse I use is configurable to program specific functions so I configured couple of the buttons to respond to any email without needing to take the pointer and hit on reply. They look jazy with many people commenting on them but I find it a big time saver.

I always liked the idea of remote starting the car in winter. But they just made it illegal in my state (CO).

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anyone mention about online secretaly?

http://www.davincivirtual.com/isitforme.asp

I was google it and find out this thing outsourcing.

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I was bing it and find out thing stink peanut butter.

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plata said: anyone mention about online secretaly?

http://www.davincivirtual.com/isitforme.asp

I was google it and find out this thing outsourcing.
Sounds like you need a 'secretaly'.

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vkva said: I always liked the idea of remote starting the car in winter. But they just made it illegal in my state (CO). Why?

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jcbrooks said: vkva said: I always liked the idea of remote starting the car in winter. But they just made it illegal in my state (CO). Why?
I am guessing you are asking why they made remote starting illegal: to discourage car theft. They can ticket anyone not present in the car and leave the car running. They call them "puffers".
If you were asking about why I like the idea ... get the car warmed up in winter.

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PolarDude said: How about cutting out exercise altogether? That will save time, and money on a gym membership.

Do short duration high intensity workouts instead of long leisurely workouts:

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/06/24/can-you-get-fit-in-six-...

Can You Get Fit in Six Minutes a Week?
. . .
Gibala and his colleagues had a group of college students, who were healthy but not athletes, ride a stationary bike at a sustainable pace for between 90 and 120 minutes. Another set of students grunted through a series of short, strenuous intervals: 20 to 30 seconds of cycling at the highest intensity the riders could stand. After resting for four minutes, the students pedaled hard again for another 20 to 30 seconds, repeating the cycle four to six times (depending on how much each person could stand), “for a total of two to three minutes of very intense exercise per training session,” Gibala says.

Each of the two groups exercised three times a week. After two weeks, both groups showed almost identical increases in their endurance (as measured in a stationary bicycle time trial), even though the one group had exercised for six to nine minutes per week, and the other about five hours. Additionally, molecular changes that signal increased fitness were evident equally in both groups. “The number and size of the mitochondria within the muscles” of the students had increased significantly, Gibala says, a change that, before this work, had been associated almost exclusively with prolonged endurance training. Since mitochondria enable muscle cells to use oxygen to create energy, “changes in the volume of the mitochondria can have a big impact on endurance performance.” In other words, six minutes or so a week of hard exercise (plus the time spent warming up, cooling down, and resting between the bouts of intense work) had proven to be as good as multiple hours of working out for achieving fitness. The short, intense workouts aided in weight loss, too, although Gibala hadn’t been studying that effect. “The rate of energy expenditure remains higher longer into recovery” after brief, high-intensity exercise than after longer, easier workouts, Gibala says. Other researchers have found that similar, intense, brief sessions of exercise improve cardiac health, even among people with heart disease.

. . .

There’s a catch, though. Those six minutes, if they’re to be effective, must hurt. “We describe it as an ‘all-out’ effort,” Gibala says. You’ll be straying “well out of your comfort zone.” That level of discomfort makes some activities better-suited to intense training than others. “We haven’t studied runners,” Gibala says. The pounding involved in repeated sprinting could lead to injuries, depending on a runner’s experience and stride mechanics. But cycling and swimming work well. “I’m a terrible swimmer,” Gibala says, “so every session for me is intense, just because my technique is so awful.”
Meanwhile, his lab is studying whether people could telescope their workouts into even less time. Could a single, two- to three-minute bout of intense exercise confer the same endurance and health benefits as those six minutes of multiple intervals? Gibala is hopeful. “I’m 41, with two young children,” he says. “I don’t have time to go out and exercise for hours.” The results should be available this fall.

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This study has some major flaws. 1)They are ignoring the warm up and cool down time and the rest time. One can't go all out without being completely warmed up.

3 minutes of intense exercise in this manner takes 43 minutes.

15 minute warm up + 30 second intense + 4 minute rest + 30 second intense + 4 minute rest + 30 second intense + 4 minute rest + 30 second intense + 4 minute rest + 30 second intense + 4 minute rest + 30 second intense + 5 minute cool down.

One won't get in very good shape riding a stationary bike for 90 -120 minutes because the long duration will force someone (unless they are in great shape) to go very slowly.

I'm sure that the study would also find that someone who goes for 30 minutes can get in better shape than someone who goes for 120 minutes.

In general, I agree with the concept that hard work beats long work.

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InsuranceExpert said: This study has some major flaws. 1)They are ignoring the warm up and cool down time and the rest time. One can't go all out without being completely warmed up.

3 minutes of intense exercise in this manner takes 43 minutes.


The only "major flaws" of the NYT blog report on the study (which is not the same as the study itself, which is actually a different text (!)) is that it wasn't written to a 4th grade reading comprehension level.

Those who are deficient in reading comprehension, or otherwise read texts by skipping large clauses in sentences, may be confused by the blog report because they may have missed the part (quoted in bold above) that states " six minutes or so a week of hard exercise (plus the time spent warming up, cooling down, and resting between the bouts of intense work)".

It could be that the blog report would be less confusing to some if it stated "43 minutes of hard exercise -- if by 'hard exercise' you also mean 'warming up and resting time'."

Another more detailed article summarizing the study -- but again still not the original article -- is at http://www.webmd.com/fitness-exercise/news/20050603/fitness-in-6-minutes-week.

Abstracts are at http://jap.physiology.org/cgi/search?andorexactfulltext=and&resourcetype=1&disp_type=&sortspec=relevance&author1=gibala&fulltext=&pubdate_year=&volume=&firstpage=

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This isn't about reading comprehension. I didn't miss the large bolded clause. I'm simply pointing out that because of the large bolded clause, this technique really isn't much of a time saver. The headline, "Can you get fit in 6 minutes a week?" is really misleading.

If I'm not mistaken, this thread is about saving time. Maybe the only flaw here is posting this as a time saving technique.

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vkva said: jcbrooks said: vkva said: I always liked the idea of remote starting the car in winter. But they just made it illegal in my state (CO). Why?
I am guessing you are asking why they made remote starting illegal: to discourage car theft. They can ticket anyone not present in the car and leave the car running. They call them "puffers".
If you were asking about why I like the idea ... get the car warmed up in winter.


What a retarded law. When I lived in a cold climate, I would go out and start the car before eating breakfast. By time I was done with breakfast the car would be warm. I'm sure that discourages theft so much more than a remote starter. It should simply be a question on your insurance application. And you pay a premium to insure a remote starter.

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InsuranceExpert said: This isn't about reading comprehension. I didn't miss the large bolded clause. I'm simply pointing out that because of the large bolded clause, this technique really isn't much of a time saver. The headline, "Can you get fit in 6 minutes a week?" is really misleading.

If I'm not mistaken, this thread is about saving time. Maybe the only flaw here is posting this as a time saving technique.


instead of jogging for hours, do a few intense sprints. Or instead of doing three sets of 15 reps of a full circuit of many machines and free weights, multiple times per week, just do 1 intense set to muscle failure of a few key core compound exercies, once a week. Those are big time savers.

see also http://www.upstatetoday.com/news/2009/jan/14/harder-and-shorter/
http://www.amazon.com/Body-Science-Research-Program-Results/dp/0...

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/01/090127190344.htm "What we have found is that doing a few intense muscle exercises, each lasting only about 30 seconds, dramatically improves your metabolism . . . . Current exercise guidelines suggest that people should perform moderate to vigorous aerobic and resistance exercise for several hours per week. . . . The low volume, high intensity training utilized in our study substantially improved both insulin action and glucose clearance in otherwise sedentary young males. . . ."


http://uk.reuters.com/article/idUKTRE50R0BH20090128 "You can make just as big as an effect doing this as you can by doing hours and hours of endurance training each week."


http://baye.com/high-intensity-interval-training-versus-higher-volume-lower-intensity-training-for-fat-loss/ "Most high intensity training workouts consist of one set per exercise of twelve or fewer exercises. More traditional Nautilus-style high intensity training routines which typically included slighly higher volume, usually 12 to 16 exercises (4 to 6 for the lower body, 8 to 10 for the upper body and trunk) can be completed in under 25 minutes if there is little or no rest between exercises. Contemporary high intensity training routines, such as Mike Mentzer’s consolidated Heavy Duty routines, John Little’s Max Contraction routines and Doug McGuff’s “Big Five” routine consist of less than half that volume, and can be completed in less than 15 minutes even without rushing, and in some cases under 10 depending on the duration of the exercises and rest intervals. . . . I currently train about once every 5 days, or about six times per month, for a total of less than one hour and 30 minutes of exercise per month, less than 18 hours total in a year. I am able to maintain a relatively low bodyfat level with just this and following a moderately-strict, paleo-style diet. Most of my clients train once or twice weekly for about 20 minutes per workout, totalling between an hour and 20 minutes to two hours and forty minutes cumulative training time per month, and when they follow a similar diet they are able to lose a significant amount of fat per week. One woman went from 245 to 117 in a little over a year (lost over 128 pounds of fat) and one man went from 254 to 182 (lost over 72 pounds of fat) in a little under a year - neither spent more than three hours a month working out. In 2005 I trained a man who went from 310 pounds to the mid 220’s in about half a year with only one weekly workout consisting of one set each of only six exercises. At the time we were using SuperSlow repetitions, 10 seconds lifting, 10 seconds lowering, for 4 to 8 repetitions, or about 1:20 to 2:40, and rushed between exercises. His workouts typically lasted around 15 minutes"

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vkva said: I am guessing you are asking why they made remote starting illegal: to discourage car theft.With my remote starter (Viper 550), the key must be in the ignition to switch the car out of park. If you remotely start the car and step on the brake (required to switch out of park) without putting the key in the ignition, the engine shuts down.

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jayK said: vkva said: I am guessing you are asking why they made remote starting illegal: to discourage car theft.With my remote starter (Viper 550), the key must be in the ignition to switch the car out of park. If you remotely start the car and step on the brake (required to switch out of park) without putting the key in the ignition, the engine shuts down.

starting your car causes the MOST wear and POLLUTION on the planet. there is a RTFM here. When safe; you should always start your car for 30-60s in cold climates; ensure your windows are sufficiently safe to travel(duh); and then drive lightly. This means do not lug the car and do not rev it. Lay off the boost. This will warm up the engine the fastest possible and reduce pollutants in your oil (gas in oil is not a good lube).

We have these lovely things called heated seats and steering wheels; on decent cars they can reach full temp in less than a minute.

i'm not a tree hugger but hurting your car by letting it idle to warm-up is not the best intention.

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jayK said: vkva said: I am guessing you are asking why they made remote starting illegal: to discourage car theft.With my remote starter (Viper 550), the key must be in the ignition to switch the car out of park. If you remotely start the car and step on the brake (required to switch out of park) without putting the key in the ignition, the engine shuts down.
Agree. Here is a link.. I heard stories about co-workers calling on their colleages, they don't like.
Keeping up with spirit of this thread... this is such a waste of time. When someone hit me in a parking lot long time ago... the cops did not show up saying... they are too busy to attend parking lot bumper accidents and wanted us to exchange insurance info and leave. But with this law they somehow have to find time to cite people "pubffing" in a parking lot or even their own driveway. I am sure lot of states will have one or the other law that is not practical and cities often look the other way... but it makes you wonder why lot of cities are enforcing this one seriously.

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If I bad to guess, they can't just blow you off outright if your car does get stolen, so they're trying to do what they can to prevent that. Also easier to steal cars may have higher incidences of being used in abductions and other crimes. Maybe they could leave the tickets, but the car owners shouldn't have to pay if they can prove the remote start was equipped with anti-theft features at the time the ticket was issued?

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Instapaper

A fast, easy, free tool to save web pages for reading later. Bookmark a webpage on one computer and review it later at home/work/phone.

How it works: You find something you want to read, but you don't have time now. You click your browser's bookmark labeled "Read Later" and a small dialogue box pop-up confirms your webpage has been saved. Then, when you have time to read it, you go to http://instapaper.com/u on any computer or phone and get retrieve what you wanted to read!

Saves me a ton of time trying to remember an old site and/or email links to myself to read later, since it automatically archives all the links you've saved/read.

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Setting the mouse pointer to automatically "Snap to" the default choice button on pop-up boxes.

Saves the hassle of moving the mouse to the button every time.

(Control panel -> mouse -> pointer options)

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foghorn19 said: Setting the mouse pointer to automatically "Snap to" the default choice button on pop-up boxes.

Saves the hassle of moving the mouse to the button every time.

(Control panel -> mouse -> pointer options)

Wouldn't getting a decent pop-up blocker be a better option?

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krzywon said: foghorn19 said: Setting the mouse pointer to automatically "Snap to" the default choice button on pop-up boxes.

Saves the hassle of moving the mouse to the button every time.

(Control panel -> mouse -> pointer options)

Wouldn't getting a decent pop-up blocker be a better option?


By "pop-up boxes", he really means dialog boxes, like when you right click an icon and select "Properties", the mouse will automatically jump to the "OK" button.

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agreed that instapaper is a good way to reclaim "lost time" a few minutes at a time-- you can read in the elevator, subway, waiting in line at the grocery store. my husband uses it all the time, i'm just getting into the habit and can see how it can be very useful.

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foghorn19 said: Setting the mouse pointer to automatically "Snap to" the default choice button on pop-up boxes.

Saves the hassle of moving the mouse to the button every time.
The "Enter" key on the keyboard also works, as does the space bar. You can also usually press buttons in dialog boxes (in Windows at least) using alt-key shortcuts.

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Space bar will press the highlighted button, as well, and you can TAB between buttons (and form fields)

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I pay day-laborers $10/hr to pull out weeds in my backyard.

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