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which is your local library? do you have to live in your area to use their website?

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I did not see this posted on the thread, but I use Evernote, which syncs notes (including voice notes) between your smartphone and all your computers. With the voicenote feature which is faster than typing, I just say whatever my client needs/request into my info when on the road, and able to retrive them at home on my computer. The free service will cover most people needs.

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I always park as close as possible to the grocery cart return spot. While it doesn't necessarily save time overall, it saves time once you've loaded your groceries into your car.

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BlueSeaLake said:   corporateclaw said:   This seems like the type of place to post this inquiry: It seems like with every doctor's office that I go to, regardless of time of day of the appointment, I get the run-around of usually waiting at least 30 minutes before a nurse or something takes me back into the office, then she does a little something like take my BP or temp, and then I sit alone in the office for about 30 minutes before I'm seen by the doctor. It drives me crazy that there is pretty much universally a one-hour wait to see a doctor (from the time of the appointment).

I had the great fortune a few years ago, of being recommended to a dentist that runs his office kind of strange: He charges whatever he wants for services, bills it to the insurance, and then sends me a bill for the rest. It's usually not much of a difference, but he is really good, and the bonus is that if my appointment is at 3, and I show up at 2:45, I usually am taken back immediately and often, I'm back out the door before it's even 3. I think he takes less patients, or whatever, since he's getting more, and can have better service.

So, how in the world can I go about finding a doctor (or doctors) that do something like this? I have asked around and most people think that I'm exaggerating the wait time, recommend their doctor, and then the same stuff happens at their doctor. I just want to be able to take care of doctor's appointments without having to leave work for a 4-hour block of time (to see a doctor for 5 minutes).


Send the doctor a bill for the time you waited. Turn it over to a collections agency when he does not pay. Sue him in small claims court for breach of contract, since the appointment is a contract and you have damages.
Just don't get sick, or he will let you die.


Try setting up all of your appointments on Friday afternoons after 3:30pm. You won't see the waiting room and will still be home just in time for the weekend to start at 5pm.

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BingBlangBlaow said:   I always park as close as possible to the grocery cart return spot. While it doesn't necessarily save time overall, it saves time once you've loaded your groceries into your car.

But turns out to be a time waster if you value not having dents in your car from jackwagons that ram your car while putting their carts away. I like to be 1+ spot away from the return area.

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I'm gonna be a total d*ck, but still here goes:

be patient, study & work your ass off for a career that pays off (emotionally and ethically as well as financially). i am a doctor & started a group practice, worked my a** off to do so, but now make a lot of money. a ton. so, investment of time while young = saving time when old.

of course, be sure to have fun when young (eg 20's), but don't be stupid and waste your life away doing so. go to school. you have your whole life to kick back later.

i do basically everything listed above. however, i also think there are a bunch of absurd suggestions on here..

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Not everybody has there "whole life to kick back later" because not everybody has a guaranteed lifespan to reap the rewards of massive medical school debt.

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Sorry, double post

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Could anyone explain me how to set up a Google reader to have it check Graigslist for items?

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Arrange with work to work from home, I do it twice a week and it saves me the 1 hour total commute each day = saves 2 hours per week plus $10 in gas. A double win!

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Here's one I haven't seen yet: https://www.odesk.com/

Extremely cheap labor, primarily overseas, can be used for anything - a guy I know uses them as a personal assistant - here's a perfect scenario:

He has his boss let him work remotely
He hires a remote worker for about $5 / hr to assemble his powerpoint presentation based on the instructions he left for them. It's amazing - he was out surfing at the beach all day while his work was being done by someone else, and nobody at the office knew any different. I wouldn't be surprised if he gave his chat and email info to the assistant so they could manage basic replies as well.

If you've got some extra cash, this can save all kinds of time.

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DavidScubadiver said:   I've never had a cup of coffee, saving me the hassle of having to buy, make or drink the stuff. This is the first time I've looked back, and I don't regret a thing about this.

Don't forget all of the time you have saved by not having to make as many trips to the bathroom to "recycle" your coffee!

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I have hundreds, if not thousands, of papers, notes. Searching one of them takes a long time.
What I do is to send a copy to myself through gmail, copy the reference info (title, author, journal, publication date etc) and the abstract to the mail body.
Next time to search a paper, search google inbox and I get it.

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yuanliu1 said:   I have hundreds, if not thousands, of papers, notes. Searching one of them takes a long time.
What I do is to send a copy to myself through gmail, copy the reference info (title, author, journal, publication date etc) and the abstract to the mail body.
Next time to search a paper, search google inbox and I get it.


How do you "send a copy to yourself"? Do you manually type it up and email it?

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How do you "send a copy to yourself"? Do you manually type it up and email it?

I mean the e-copy. You can scan them.

copy paste the text, and attach the document

i send from xx_bak@gmail.com to xx@gmail.com, so I have a backup copy.

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Unload your grocery cart onto the conveyor with like items you will put away when you get home (all frozen first, cold second, pantry third).

Get re-usable grocery bags that are large and sturdy (if they are flimsy the baggers will under-bag). I used to average 3-4 trips from the car to the house, and now they pack enough I can make it in 1 trip. Then, put each bag by the place you are going to unload so you don't have to go back and forth across the kitchen as you unload items one at a time. Put the bags on your door handle to take back out to the car the next time you go out.

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corporateclaw said:   AnnaMagnani said:   Paper plates for snacks, quick lunches, fruit. I used to think it was so poor and gross, then today I saw 100 plates for $3 and I thought, wow, what would it cost in water and electricity for the dishwasher, detergent, and time, to wash 100 plates? I thought $3 was actually high, since I've seen them for like .99 at CVS, but then I came to my senses.

I have often wondered that as far as "green" type issues. It would be interesting to see an actual non-biased look into the real economic and environmental costs of using disposable plates/bowls/silverware vs. non-disposable. I would think that if you could just totally do away with the non-disposable stuff, it would probably be cheaper and greener to just do disposable stuff, but obviously it would be hard to not own any glass/silverware. So it would pretty much just come down to the cost of soap/water vs. the cost of the disposable stuff/room in landfills.


If you have a yard, create a compost heap. Cheap paper plates bio-degrade nicely. If you throw them in the trash they won't bio-degrade because they're stuck in a plastic bag. Other stuff you can compost: http://www.compostinfo.com/tutorial/CanICompostIt.htm

We usually have no trouble now only having one bag of trash a week. Though we do have a separate bag we have to take to the compost heap rather than the garbage can.

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yuanliu1 said:   How do you "send a copy to yourself"? Do you manually type it up and email it?

I mean the e-copy. You can scan them.

copy paste the text, and attach the document

i send from xx_bak@gmail.com to xx@gmail.com, so I have a backup copy.


How do you convert them to plain text after scanning them? I'm interested, because I've played around with OCR features before, and it usually gets about half the words wrong

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Rewdog said:   Unload your grocery cart onto the conveyor with like items you will put away when you get home (all frozen first, cold second, pantry third)

I do the same thing! Such a time saver!
I even go so far as to place those "separators" (within my own purchase) so they bag it up the way I like.
Never fails!

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Psycho41 said:   yuanliu1 said:   How do you "send a copy to yourself"? Do you manually type it up and email it?

I mean the e-copy. You can scan them.

copy paste the text, and attach the document

i send from xx_bak@gmail.com to xx@gmail.com, so I have a backup copy.


How do you convert them to plain text after scanning them? I'm interested, because I've played around with OCR features before, and it usually gets about half the words wrong

I don't think he does convert the entire paper to plaintext. I think what he's describing is
1. Compose email
2. Put title, other tags into subject line
3. Put abstract in text into email body (fatfinger it in of you have to)
4. Attach pdf or jpg or whatever of paper
5. Send

I think this is a great idea, FWIW - I use a version of it to keep track of all sorts of stuff. I have my own domain, and I use Google Apps to run email for My Domain, which means that my personal email has all the goodness of gmail. The best part is that anyCombinationOfLetters@MyDomain gets delivered to my main email address, so all I have to do is create a label, say "Notes", then create a filter and send notes to myself at notes@MyDomain.com. I never see them in my inbox, but they are faithfully filed in the "notes" label, fully searchable, backed up, indexed, yadda yadda. Works great.

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cyberfire said:   Here's one I haven't seen yet: https://www.odesk.com/

Extremely cheap labor, primarily overseas, can be used for anything - a guy I know uses them as a personal assistant - here's a perfect scenario:

He has his boss let him work remotely
He hires a remote worker for about $5 / hr to assemble his powerpoint presentation based on the instructions he left for them. It's amazing - he was out surfing at the beach all day while his work was being done by someone else, and nobody at the office knew any different. I wouldn't be surprised if he gave his chat and email info to the assistant so they could manage basic replies as well.

If you've got some extra cash, this can save all kinds of time.


Seems like you'd want to have some level of review going on - it's all fun and games until the remote worker gets disgruntled (i.e. they don't get paid on time) and hides some stuff in the slide deck or sends some nasty emails to the boss.

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kenblakely said:   Psycho41 said:   yuanliu1 said:   How do you "send a copy to yourself"? Do you manually type it up and email it?

I mean the e-copy. You can scan them.

copy paste the text, and attach the document

i send from xx_bak@gmail.com to xx@gmail.com, so I have a backup copy.


How do you convert them to plain text after scanning them? I'm interested, because I've played around with OCR features before, and it usually gets about half the words wrong

I don't think he does convert the entire paper to plaintext. I think what he's describing is
1. Compose email
2. Put title, other tags into subject line
3. Put abstract in text into email body (fatfinger it in of you have to)
4. Attach pdf or jpg or whatever of paper
5. Send

I think this is a great idea, FWIW - I use a version of it to keep track of all sorts of stuff. I have my own domain, and I use Google Apps to run email for My Domain, which means that my personal email has all the goodness of gmail. The best part is that anyCombinationOfLetters@MyDomain gets delivered to my main email address, so all I have to do is create a label, say "Notes", then create a filter and send notes to myself at notes@MyDomain.com. I never see them in my inbox, but they are faithfully filed in the "notes" label, fully searchable, backed up, indexed, yadda yadda. Works great.


can also get an evernote acct and send the emails to yr evernote email. evernote is great.

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Cash Back credit cards are the way to go!

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-- When microwave dinners state that after 2 mins take out item, stir, and microwave again for 2 mins, just do 4 mins in one go instead. Hardly makes any difference if you stir or don't stir.

-- Buy shoes with no shoelaces, or learn a shoelace arrangement that requires no knot tying, or replace original shoelace that frequently come undone with a different material shoelace that rarely comes undone.

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Be patient with Black Friday online Sales, hitting refresh on your shopping cart will NOT convince the store to go on sale early!

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If you are happy having a Roomba for your rugs, get a Mint "swiffer robot" for your bare floors.

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- Use preset email signatures for common replies. These make my life easier at work. "Thank you for your order!"

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Fliptech said:   If you are happy having a Roomba for your rugs, get a Mint "swiffer robot" for your bare floors.

I can vouch for this. In the start, it wasted time as I would watch it roll around. Now it is a great time saver. This is really best if you have large open rooms and mostly bare floors (minimal rugs, etc.). My floors are now cleaner than when I did them the old fashioned way. Keeping the floors clean will also extend the time needed between major floor maintenance (refinishing, etc.) which can be a huge time/money sink.

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A funny and useful video on saving time on various tasks: Cool tricks to save time from Bulletproof Executive

Other good info here: Bulletproof exec

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READ FOUR HOUR WORKWEEK

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fhetter said:   READ FOUR HOUR WORKWEEK

im sure a lot of people have read that, i know i did. The difficult part is actually pulling it off the way he did, which seems atronomically impossible.

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cphali said:   fhetter said:   READ FOUR HOUR WORKWEEK

im sure a lot of people have read that, i know i did. The difficult part is actually pulling it off the way he did, which seems atronomically impossible.


I don't think the message of the book is to do everything that the author did. The best way is to pick up the points that affect you and implement them. Its worth a read even if only a few of those time saving tips can be used.

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Plant a vegetable and/or herb garden. It has financial, emotional, and physical (exercise) pay-offs.

It could be a big one in your backyard, a small plot behind your townhouse, or in containers on your apartment balcony. One of the easiest plants to grow is tomatoes. If you don't want to plant seeds, you can just chuck the innards of a store-bought one into your pot/soil. With a little watering, you won't have to buy any from June to October (or longer, if your climate is warm). You can buy a topsy-turvy and grow them hung upside-down.

Other things you can grow:
- Garlic chives (self-perpetuating)
- Mint (self-perpetuating)
- Basil (easy)
- Cilantro (easy)
- Other herbs (rosemary, thyme, etc.)
- Onions (easy)
- Cucumbers (relatively easy)
- Squash (relatively easy, unless borers / fungus get to them)
- Bell peppers (although ours always produce late)
- Jalapenos
- Broccoli (tougher - requires picking off caterpillars)
- Strawberries (ours grow well but are susceptible to small rodents)
- Raspberries (ours grow like gangbusters)
- Swiss chard and other leaf vegetables (ours comes back each year)

If you don't enjoy gardening, then you might as well spend your time doing something fun and just pay for vegetables in the grocery store.

If you do decide to garden, make sure you don't have a neighbor spraying chemicals near your plot.

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Hoogineer said:   Plant a vegetable and/or herb garden. It has financial, emotional, and physical (exercise) pay-offs.

It could be a big one in your backyard, a small plot behind your townhouse, or in containers on your apartment balcony. One of the easiest plants to grow is tomatoes. If you don't want to plant seeds, you can just chuck the innards of a store-bought one into your pot/soil. With a little watering, you won't have to buy any from June to October (or longer, if your climate is warm). You can buy a topsy-turvy and grow them hung upside-down.

Other things you can grow:
- Garlic chives (self-perpetuating)
- Mint (self-perpetuating)
- Basil (easy)
- Cilantro (easy)
- Other herbs (rosemary, thyme, etc.)
- Onions (easy)
- Cucumbers (relatively easy)
- Squash (relatively easy, unless borers / fungus get to them)
- Bell peppers (although ours always produce late)
- Jalapenos
- Broccoli (tougher - requires picking off caterpillars)
- Strawberries (ours grow well but are susceptible to small rodents)
- Raspberries (ours grow like gangbusters)
- Swiss chard and other leaf vegetables (ours comes back each year)

If you don't enjoy gardening, then you might as well spend your time doing something fun and just pay for vegetables in the grocery store.

If you do decide to garden, make sure you don't have a neighbor spraying chemicals near your plot.


How does that save you time?

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Psycho41 said:   How does that save you time?
Good call -- it doesn't necessarily save you time. This post may be better suited for another thread. However, you can look at it in the following ways:
  • The prep work and maintenance are exercise ... something your body needs anyway
  • You can save time (cumulatively) going to the grocery store for certain vegetables

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girlygabby said:   You could save time by outsourcing. "Time is worth more than Money."
There are lots of situations, why you should outsource. Even if you have a large company or just a small business, spending a little to save more money and time makes total sense.
One thing though, you should make sure that you'd hire the best staff/firm possible. I've recently wrote a blog that has an effective hiring process, I think it might help.
Click Here

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uspeed said:   Use eWallet to store your password, vehicle id number, insurance number, phone etc, it has apps on iphone and android that you can sync. Very handy when you need all the info.

I looked at all the password storage programs and found they all stink being needlessly complex or they cost too much, plus I don't like having a proprietary format that no other program uses, in case the vendor ceases support. Instead, I just use an encrypted excel file and sync automatically to all my systems with dropbox. Nothing new of course, but dropbox is what makes the syncing process so seamless & that's what I need since I might be using different systems when I need my info to read or write to for changes.

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For those of you with Comcast phone service (Xfinity Voice), you can now get transcripts of voicemails sent by email to any email address. This is free/included with the Xfinity Voice service.

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I use roboform. i Can sync it accross multiple computers and everything is encrypted in its database. Its the best password vault/form filler i have used.

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WatFallet said:   For those of you with Comcast phone service (Xfinity Voice), you can now get transcripts of voicemails sent by email to any email address. This is free/included with the Xfinity Voice service.

I guess they had to do something to stop people from cancelling voice service in order to switch to Google Voice...

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