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Well I just got a great deal on license plates for my old car. $51 for 2 years instead of $128. It turned 20 this year, and that makes it a historic vehicle! I filled out a little form, showed the title to the nice lady, and now my 1989 Toyota Corolla SW is a certified piece of Americana. So, now comes a discount on insurance, and no more emissions inspections! That's a very good thing as my mechanic told me last year it wouldn't pass without a new catalytic converter. Evidently 20+ year old cars cause less damage in accidents, and don't mess up the air quality anymore, and the car is much safer as I can now transfer the title without a safety inspection! Being safe is a good thing. Anyway, the whole thing tickled my inner cheapskate to tearful joy and I had to share. Other states may offer similar deals, foreigners may want to check in their own states.

BTW if anyone wants to know what my little car looks like those guys in the freecreditreport.com band drive one just like it in one of their commercials. Even the body damage is almost identical. Seriously, when I saw it the first time I asked my wife, "why are they making fun of my car on TV"? Oh right, they'd rather pay interest on a loan, full insurance payments, have to schlep to the emissions inspection station every other year and pay at least $14, pay $38.50 per year extra in registration fees, and drive a car that's not as safe.

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Well, on Sunday evening they had an NBA basketball game, and since that's an occasion I took my little car out for a dri... (more)

WalStMonky (Apr. 28, 2009 @ 9:57a) |

It was $75 a year. ($59 a year now)

bksavings (Apr. 28, 2009 @ 10:09a) |

Lovin those bumper guards!!!

SUCKISSTAPLES (Apr. 28, 2009 @ 10:14p) |

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Generally historic cars/ plates come with restrictions.

Have fun when you get in an accident and the insurance company refuses to pay after they find out the car was being used as a day to day car and did not meet the legal requirements for being a historic car. Or when you drive it on the highway and the cops pull you over and ticket you for driving illegally. (edit: I think they're actually using highway to refer to all public roads... but in any case i think before getting a historic plates i would want that sentence fully explained).

Marylands rules for historic plates:

Historic:

* To qualify as a historic vehicle, your vehicle must not have been substantially altered, remodeled, or remanufactured from its original construction, and must be 20 model years or older.
* A historic vehicle 60 years or older may obtain a one-time, permanent, non-transferable registration. This vehicle registration does not qualify for specialty plates.
* Vehicles classified as historic certifies the vehicle will be maintained for use in exhibitions, club activities, parades, tours, occasional transportation and similar uses. The vehicle owner further certifies the vehicle will not be used for general daily transportation or primarily for the transportation of passenngers or property on highways. You will need to fill out the Application for Historic or Street Rod Registration (form # VR-096).

I can get around any of that nonsense. Good gosh how silly, being scared by a bunch of boilerplate. There won't be any tickets if I get pulled over because I'll be on the way to exhibit my car. Kind of like the only way to get nailed for not wearing your seat belt in an accident where you were injured is to admit it. But no need to take my word for it, just google Maryland Historic plates and see how the people that have already joined the club relate their experiences. I'll sum it up for you: no worries.

I can't wait until the car is 60! No more fees after that forever!

WalStMonky said: I can get around any of that nonsense. Good gosh how silly, being scared by a bunch of boilerplate. There won't be any tickets if I get pulled over because I'll be on the way to exhibit my car. Kind of like the only way to get nailed for not wearing your seat belt in an accident where you were injured is to admit it. But no need to take my word for it, just google Maryland Historic plates and see how the people that have already joined the club relate their experiences. I'll sum it up for you: no worries.

I can't wait until the car is 60! No more fees after that forever!


Good you for you for doing something illegal.

Horse hockey. My car fits the requirements, there's nothing 'illegal' involved here. Did you notice that occasional use is also acceptable? For crying out loud the car is overworked if it gets 3000 miles per year. I challenge you to classify that as anything but occasional use.

Sheesh, sheeple.

In PA, you must have another primary vehicle - If your old car is the only one you have, they won't give you a classic or antique registration. We have 2 regular cars and an antique and I love the $100/year insurance on the antique!

WalStMonky said: Horse hockey. My car fits the requirements, there's nothing 'illegal' involved here. Did you notice that occasional use is also acceptable? For crying out loud the car is overworked if it gets 3000 miles per year. I challenge you to classify that as anything but occasional use.

Sheesh, sheeple.


Not exactly. Regardless if you agree or not with the laws what you are doing is bending the law and depending on the exactly wording could be construed as illegal. You already joked with the idea of telling the blue light gang an excuse so just accept what you are doing is not the purpose of historic plates. I am not knocking you for it just pointing it out. If you are going to do something against the state you should not try and hide it.

if he has a primary vehicle and this one sees only occassoonal use there is no fraud or rule bending

WalStMonky said: Kind of like the only way to get nailed for not wearing your seat belt in an accident where you were injured is to admit it.

Try driving through IL you will be in for a surprise.



WI has something similar, I Know that you can't drive the vehicle between the months of Oct-March I belive and there is a limit on the number if miles you can drive it. I think the registration fee is stupidly low to like $100 lifetime or something.

I finally called USAA today and the nice lady was baffled by my idea that historic tags would lower the insurance.

I doubt I'll have occasion to drive this car in IL or WI, but reality is that it's legally registered.

It's perfectly absurd the reaction to this thread. If you think I've done anything illegal, you're a blistering idiot. Quite simply the car and its usage complies with the regulation. It's sheer idiocy to pay more than you have to for any type of goods or services. I thought that perhaps my discovery might benefit a few other Fat Walleteers who might have similar vehicles. Quite simply if you have such a vehicle and pay full price for tags you need to be cashiered out of the cheapskate club.

WalStMonky said: I finally called USAA today and the nice lady was baffled by my idea that historic tags would lower the insurance.

Of course they were...any "normal" insurance company doesn't care about how you register a vehicle...

What you'd need it to go to one of the companies that offer "classic car" or "antique auto" insurance policies, such as Chubb, Hagerty or Sneed...

Unfortunately, those policies WILL hold you to the rules regarding secondary vehicle, garage, no daily-driver type usage, not left unattended, etc...plus good luck finding one that will classify a piece-o-crap '89 Corolla as a "classic"...

I think lots of restored classic vehicles are initially purchased or the project started with the vehicle a total piece of crap. Personally I think restoring an El Camino and calling it a classic is moronic, but there's a large club of aficionados who do this. There's also a large following of people that restore Corollas and call them classics as well, though I could only find one restored SW in a fairly brief google. I guess I'm skeptical that I couldn't get it classified as such were I interested in restoring it. But the only reason I can think of to go with specialty insurance would be if I were going to put money into it, carry comprehensive and collision, and attempt to recoup costs over 'blue book' value in the event of a collision. Somehow I doubt the liability would be less even with a specialty insurer. The damage done by the car in a collision won't be any more or less with historic tags, and I've already got it listed with the insurance company at the lowest number of miles per year that they allow.

Daily driver, hah. The car has been out of my driveway once this month, to drive to the MVA to fetch its new plates and return the old. It's an odds on bet that I'll have to jump it when I go out to drive it in a few weeks.

In my state driving around with historic plates is like driving around with no headlights on at night. You become a cop magnet. It's worse since front plates are legally required but if you get historic registration they only give you a rear plate which draws even more attention. Leave the H&B at home and wear your seatbelt or spend a little extra money and blend back in with the rest of society.

Hookers? What would I need with hookers? The car is chick magnet.

I'll be sure to post here if I get pulled over. You'll pardon me if I disregard all the dire warnings being proffered as I think they have no factual basis. Perhaps in IA. In my state the police are required to have a reason to pull you over. Having properly displayed tags with current stickers does not qualify.

WalStMonky said: In my state the police are required to have a reason to pull you over.

I guess we found the one person who actually does 55 on the beltway.

WalStMonky said: Somehow I doubt the liability would be less even with a specialty insurer. The damage done by the car in a collision won't be any more or less with historic tags, and I've already got it listed with the insurance company at the lowest number of miles per year that they allow.

You would be totally wrong!

People I know using those types of companies (mostly Sneed) are paying in the range of $120-$300/year for FULL coverage, including "agreed value" for loss. Of course, usage is restricted and you must garage the car...plus it has to actually be "collectible" in the eyes of the company, a hurdle you honestly can't clear. ("Newer" cars are generally covered on a case by case basis...some of those firms might have for example an '89 Toyota Supra on their covered vehicle lists, but I'd be shocked to find one willing to cover an '89 Corolla...unusual to find a nice one still around, but still not collectible to 99.9999999% of the population.)

MadAnthony said: WalStMonky said: In my state the police are required to have a reason to pull you over.

I guess we found the one person who actually does 55 on the beltway.


LOL...he'd be the victim of a road-rage execution killing long before the cops would get to him!

MadAnthony said: WalStMonky said: In my state the police are required to have a reason to pull you over.

I guess we found the one person who actually does 55 on the beltway.


I'm no extremist. Sometimes I've exceeded the speed limit by as much as 5 MPH! As far as going as fast as 55 mph on the beltway, what a fantasy. It's always a pleasure to get to the exit ramp so I can finally use my accelerator!

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Just for kicks and giggles I went to Sneed's website. Other than a min value of $5k my reading says my car qualifies when it turns 25. All I have to do is add $5000 of value to it and wait 5 more years. I've got 1000 sq ft garage so that part isn't hard. If you google "restored Toyota Corolla" you'd see that there are lots of people who call them classics and spend lots of money restoring them. Yes, IQ's perhaps 2 points higher than a restored El Camino owner, but it still isn't uncommon. BTW I'll bet you didn't know that the Corolla is the best selling vehicle of all time.

Emphasis added:

Classic Car:

Any vehicle in excellent condition or fully restored can be considered for Sneedís Classic Car Insurance. If you arenít sure if your vehicle qualifies please call 1.800.619.7827 or Email Us.

WalStMonky} said: If you google "restored Toyota Corolla" you'd see that there are lots of people who call them classics and spend lots of money restoring them. Yes, IQ's perhaps 2 points higher than a restored El Camino owner, but it still isn't uncommon. BTW I'll bet you didn't know that the Corolla is the best selling vehicle of all time.

I did know that...finally surpassed the VW Beetle after they finally stopped producing those in Mexico and Brazil...

Yes, the only rear-wheel-drive Corolla from the 70's are semi-collectible...and the early-80's Corolla GTS rear-wheel-drive hatchbacks are popular "drift" cars...

I'll bet you didn't know that the late-80's Corolla is the unofficial car of Afghanistan...I'd estimate over 2/3 of the cars in Kabul were that body-style of Corolla...including a fair number of wagons. Can you imagine what the fuel mileage must be on the diesel Corolla that was sold in the more 'rustic' areas of the world!!! (Bonus points if you knew that they prize the "Canadian Corolla" imports as much more desirable than the "German Corolla" sourced cars...paying as much as 50% more for one from Canada...although I never found out what the difference actually was...)

WalStMonky said: Just for kicks and giggles I went to Sneed's website. Other than a min value of $5k my reading says my car qualifies when it turns 25. All I have to do is add $5000 of value to it and wait 5 more years.

LOL!!

I have my 1982 Mercury Lynx registered as a historic auto in NY.
A nice thing about that in NY, is that you can put the original plates on the car from the year it was manufactured.

someone here at FW had a 80s ford escort insured as a collector car for something like $6 per year.

I'll use this as yet still another excuse to keep my vintage Escort.

Well, on Sunday evening they had an NBA basketball game, and since that's an occasion I took my little car out for a drive to Baltimore. When I was there I noticed I was almost out of gas and stopped at a Texaco. after contemplating the average price of fuel in my tank but unable to recall exactly what I paid last time I filled up (3.25?) I looked up and noticed that the gas station bays had been converted to house the local Baltimore City police neighborhood substation, and the place was absolutely lousy with cops. I finished filling my tank, and left. Later I checked my license plates, and not a single cop had stuck to either one. They sure aren't much of a cop magnet from that data point.


1982 Mercury Lynx (Ford Escort)
Disclaimer
SUCKISSTAPLES said: someone here at FW had a 80s ford escort insured as a collector car for something like $6 per year.It was $75 a year. ($59 a year now)

bksavings said: SUCKISSTAPLES said: someone here at FW had a 80s ford escort insured as a collector car for something like $6 per year.It was $75 a year. ($59 a year now)Lovin those bumper guards!!!



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