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She's a nurse, or going to be... IMO, she should pay the $400 or whatever small dollar amount is due and move on. She's been compensated well enough at this point. She'll be making almost $400 per day as a nurse sooner or later. Chalk this up to experience, move on and enjoy your life.

Sounds like your GF already agreed to the deal, so tell her to keep her word. I think what the dentist offered is fair, as she had agreed to pay for the crown before doing the root canal. Sounds like she is still paying a similar amount and getting an implant. Don't screw the dentist (or is it a dental student?) who tried to do the right thing when the initial root canal did not turn out well.

This is what I would do at this point...............

After the procedure has finally been completed, I would say to the Dentist:"Look I have had to come here for 8 extra visits over the last 6 months, this has been a major inconvenience for me as my time is valuable, and in addition I have had to endure a lot more pain and stress than if the root canal had been done properly. Based on these facts I don't feel that it is fair for you to ask me to pay any additional amounts."

He may agree or not, but if it was me I wouldn't pay another dime. The prices of the procedures are really irrelevant, because of the fact that this is about an admittedly botched procedure. I'm also assuming there was nothing in writing, as in a signed contract. It doesn't really matter if the cost was 10k because this was a screw up, so forget about applying all these price formulas. If he can't be convinced, then I would say, "see you in court" and leave. Any Judge will hold the dentist to a higher standard, as soon as he admits that he botched it, it's all over for him, assuming he would even dare try to collect on it. He's the one that got off easy, if you had taken him to court it would have cost him a lot more.

SpinDizzy said: She's a nurse, or going to be... IMO, she should pay the $400 or whatever small dollar amount is due and move on. She's been compensated well enough at this point. She'll be making almost $400 per day as a nurse sooner or later. Chalk this up to experience, move on and enjoy your life.

How has she been compensated for her time, inconvenience, stress and pain for the last 6 months?

The dollar amount is irrelevant, and so is her career.

The Dentist is the one that should chalk this up to experience.

Mitsuko said: The dentist is asking her to pay for the crown that goes on top of the implant, because she would have had to pay for a crown that goes on top of a root canal anyway. Same price. Implants are a more predictable treatment option than root canal. I think she's getting a pretty good deal.


Blanket statements like "Implants are a more predictable treatment option than root canal" is false, misleading, and uneducated. Root canals have a very high success rate and preserve both bone around the tooth as well as keeping a normal appearance of your gums. If a root canal fails you can always place an implant but if an implant fails or is placed incorrectly you are in big trouble. Implant companies are trying to push dentists to needlessly pull teeth out and place implants when its not needed. Keeping your own tooth, when possible, is superior to an implant, and is is equally predictable to an implant. The problem comes in when you compare the work of general dentists compared to specialists. Implants by periodontists, root canals by endodontists and predictability is the same.

As far as the root canal she received, the dentist probably included possible risks and benefits in his consent form and depending on how "botched" it is the dentist probably explained the material risks before he began. As long as he told her what happened that is the important part as most of the mistakes can be considered a common occurrence in the procedure. $400 is a great deal no matter what tooth it was but a good deal doesn't mean that quality should be sacrificed. I think that he has gone above and beyond what he is required to pay and it is reasonable for her to pay for the crown. Hope this helps

Also a dentist paying for a procedure is not always an admittance of guilt.

LOOPHOLE said: This is what I would do at this point...............

After the procedure has finally been completed, I would say to the Dentist:"Look I have had to come here for 8 extra visits over the last 6 months, this has been a major inconvenience for me as my time is valuable, and in addition I have had to endure a lot more pain and stress than if the root canal had been done properly. Based on these facts I don't feel that it is fair for you to ask me to pay any additional amounts."

He may agree or not, but if it was me I wouldn't pay another dime. The prices of the procedures are really irrelevant, because of the fact that this is about an admittedly botched procedure. I'm also assuming there was nothing in writing, as in a signed contract. It doesn't really matter if the cost was 10k because this was a screw up, so forget about applying all these price formulas. If he can't be convinced, then I would say, "see you in court" and leave. Any Judge will hold the dentist to a higher standard, as soon as he admits that he botched it, it's all over for him, assuming he would even dare try to collect on it. He's the one that got off easy, if you had taken him to court it would have cost him a lot more.


Most likely the dentist did screw up otherwise he would not have been willing to cover the other costs. And yes, I too would not expect to pay a dime for any botched up procedure. However in this case it appears that the patient agreed to the terms offered by the dentist after the botched up procedure. So it would not be justified to back away from the agreement and say "see you in court" after the dentist fulfilled his promise to correct the mistake.

I don't think paying an additional $500 for the crown is out of line. She opted for a root canal, and the dentist is trying to make the best of a bad situation. The dentist could have just slapped a crown on the tooth anyway and moved on, but it sounds like he is trying to do the right thing. Now if he wants $600-700 for the implant, well I draw the line there. Bargain with the dentist. Mention the additional 6 months of pain and inconvenience that was endured. Also, I would mention that since you don't have insurance, you are well aware you are paying full price where an insurance company would have negotiated a discount. I'm not sure the average percentage of patients that see a dentist without insurance, but it gives some pause for thought.

EvilCapitalist said: Since I had to price thsi recently in Philadelphia metro, everything cash:

Implant from -excellent- specialist is nearly $4,000 (all procedures needed).
Root canal from an -excellent- specialist ( who does ONLY root canals ) is $1250.
Crown from an -excellent- specialist are around $900.

Regardless of where she went I'd say the odds are that if she picked the same "tiers" for specialists across the board the price ratio will be simliar.


You could have just taken a vacation to India for the $4000 and got everything done in $900 and could have easily saved $1250.
http://www.medinetindia.com/dental.php

fwratz1 said: $400 for a root canal? Seems pretty cheap.

Is $400 really that good of a deal for a root canal?

I have had 5 done, 3 last year.. they were each $500, and had one redone from when I was 12 which cost $1250 required some specialist.

From a non-legal perspective, you paying the additional $600 would be fair, and you not paying the additional $600 would be fair as well. If you don't feel like going to court, why not suggest that you guys split the difference. settle at $300. If you feel that the dentist was negligent (ie drunk or whatever that would be a totally different story). In short, talk to the dentist... I believe that you guys should be able to come up with a fair solution -- where everyone can be happy.

Settle with the dentist for some additional implants for your GF.

garlicnun said: EvilCapitalist said: Since I had to price thsi recently in Philadelphia metro, everything cash:

Implant from -excellent- specialist is nearly $4,000 (all procedures needed).
Root canal from an -excellent- specialist ( who does ONLY root canals ) is $1250.
Crown from an -excellent- specialist are around $900.

Regardless of where she went I'd say the odds are that if she picked the same "tiers" for specialists across the board the price ratio will be simliar.


You could have just taken a vacation to India for the $4000 and got everything done in $900 and could have easily saved $1250.
http://www.medinetindia.com/dental.php


Thank you but I prefer to have access to the top tier specialists with offices within 10 minute walk from where I live so should I have a problem it can be addressed. To me that is worth the money I would have "saved" by doing it in India.

Like a couple of others have said, bargain with the dentist. Offer to pay the price of the crown and he picks up the difference for the implant. Seems the most fair to me. My personal, somewhat related anectdote - a few years ago my aging dentist was getting ready to retire and brought his son in to take over the practice. Son was always itching to do tons of work. I ended up with a bad tooth and he was pushing HARD for a bridge. I asked for his dad to take a look at it and he said a root canal would be fine (difference of about $400). Once he retired I switched dentists as did many of his patients. In fact, the son no longer practices in that building.

If I were the dentist I would have asked her to sign a release and waiver and in return I would have return all money she paid me and additionally paid for all other work related to getting the tooth to the best possible state.

I might even have offered her additional money for the inconvenience that this led to.

If the dentist admitted making an error which led to the botched procedure he is risking a lot by not making the problem go away quickly. Many malpractice lawyers will take on this case without any money upfront resulting in the dentist paying quite a bit more money out of pocket.

... Let's take this one step further, if in 15 years from now something happens and she needs to have further work on this tooth how much more is it going to cost her then if it was simply replacing the crown? Her future out of pocket could be very substantial due to his negligence.

StNick said: If I were the dentist I would have asked her to sign a release and waiver and in return I would have return all money she paid me and additionally paid for all other work related to getting the tooth to the best possible state.

I might even have offered her additional money for the inconvenience that this led to.

If the dentist admitted making an error which led to the botched procedure he is risking a lot by not making the problem go away quickly. Many malpractice lawyers will take on this case without any money upfront resulting in the dentist paying quite a bit more money out of pocket.

... Let's take this one step further, if in 15 years from now something happens and she needs to have further work on this tooth how much more is it going to cost her then if it was simply replacing the crown? Her future out of pocket could be very substantial due to his negligence.


Sure, Listen you can obviously take a more aggressive approach to this -- you could even sue the dentist regardless of what the dentist is offering. But there is also something to say about doing the right thing. If OP can afford to so and he doesn't feel that the dentist was negligent -- I believe they can come to an amicable solution without going to court.

Pun said: oopsz said: jrtang said: She's a full-time nursing student and can't afford a lawyer. She's not really one to sue for the sake of suing and really just doesn't want to pay more than she's obligated to. That's why I'm posting here. In a botched procedure, what is the the party at fault generally liable for? What is the victim obligated to pay?

A "botched procedure" is also known as malpractice. If you had called lawyers in your area, I'm sure you could have found one to give you a free consult, and they would have detailed your rights. Instead, you took his terms. Basically, you've already settled- in lieu of suing him, he's given you lots of free dental work.

If you had sued him, his malpractice insurance would have paid the claim, but it seems to me the dentist decided giving you free dental work was cheaper than his insurance rates going up. At this point, I don't think you're entitled to anything more than what you've got, because that's what you agreed to. You don't have anything left to bargain with.

(This is not legal advice. I am not your lawyer. Etc.)


ABSOLUTELY WRONG ADVICE
Botched procedure is not necessarily malpractice. Malpractice is when one knowingly caused a harmful damage without informing the patient. This dentist did everything RIGHT (except the procedure) by the book. This case will not even get reviewed by the boards/court.


So a doctor cannot unknowingly commit malpractice by not being careful enough?

Puns posts in this thread are real bad and should be ignored.

ClaimsGuy said: Puns posts in this thread are real bad and should be ignored.

Agreed, we need to get to the root of this situation.

1)She is a nurse and will be soon making $400 per day. So what?
2)The doctor at least told her about what he did and not covered it up? Um, isn't that what you expect? You can't hold people who do the right think up to a higher standard. Many dentists who take pride in their work probably winced at your comment.
3)The root canal cost less then normal. Unless the dentist gave the OP's girlfriend a discount, the cost shouldn't be used in the context of "You got a discount/cheap root canal so you saved money and shouldn't complain."

Why do people bring up useless facts? The above 3 statements don't contribute anything to the discussion.

The person who suggested going to India to get the dental work done is obviously a genius. Why doesn't everyone just fly to India for the weekend and get all of their medical work done. Tickets are so cheap, and getting around by yourself is super easy. And you can always call the doctor up and ask questions or see him... What do you think would have happened had the OP's girlfriend went to India, had the root canal and the doctor there made the same error?

Pun, you seem to be very sure of your opinion and want the OP's girlfriend to follow it. Don't forget that one of the benefits of this message boards is conflicting opinions and debates about them. While the OP might very well do what you mentioned, hearing about other points of view will be beneficial for him. Also, you should mention that you are not a lawyer as far as legal advice(unless you are)

It seems like aside from FRAUDulently not telling the OP's girlfriend about his mistake and covering it up, the dentist is getting off with a very minimal cost. He is just paying for someone else to fix his mistake (work and materials minus the item he wants the GF to pay for) He isn't considering that the GF might have had to miss work or school, or have extra dental visits with more pain and inconvenience. So I'm not as agreeable with the comment that the dentist is doing the right thing. Personally, if I was in the dentists shoe's, I'd probobly pay for everything plus give the GF 1-2K. You also have to look at it from his point of view, no one is suying him, he isn't going to have to deal with lawyers, courts or insurance or any other problems that can potentially happen.

I think that the OP needs to explain exactly how the dentist messed up? This should be explained in the letter he gave her. He should at the very least show the letter to a dentist, or an authority in the field to see if it makes sense, and to understand what possible problems can come from this down the line. (Good call on future out of pocket STNick)
If the procedure was not satisfactory because the root canal was very complex and the dentist made a slight error, that scenario is a lot different then if the procedure as messed up because the dentist forgot to do something.

Different people have different attitudes. Some have the ambulance chaser mindset, while some seem to be more forgiving.

Advice summary: 1)Show the letter to another dental authority and have him explain it to you. 2)Speak to the dentist who put in the implant about possible damage that he could have seen and if anything was wrong. He may very well tell you that the problem with the root canal will be completely fixed with the implant. 3) Post results and figure out where to go from there.

-Grey

Was the dentist at a mexican market, hiding under a rock?

I ask because i remember the times when I was broke (not that I am wealthy now), jobless and uninsured and for trying to save money on a crown, I ended up visiting a dirt cheap dentist in a mexican market. I don't think he was licensed in the USA. Regardless, the job cost almost 1/3 of the regular price. After enduring some unexpected pain, developing some tooth abscess, a few years later i was told by more than one dentist the work done was so rudimentary that they were surprised it lasted that long. The moral of all this is that in that you get what you pay for...

I never finished making payments to that bean guy :p

jrtang said: Who is liable for what?I don't know. Third base!

gwu1986 said: IIRC, an implant and a crown are nowhere near the same price.

I was waiting for someone to mention this. An implant crown is more expensive than a crown used for a root canal.

The bare minimum here is to ask the doctor to cover the difference between the crown for the implant ($600-$700) and the crown for the root canal ($500). Your GF was going to get a crown originally anyways. And since the original $500 also included his profit, I would ask to split the cost on that since he should not be profiting on this procedure now. So my final costs:

Assuming a $700 crown for the implant ...

$700 - $500 = $200 (doc covers this difference)
$500/2 = $250 (doc covers this)
$500/2 = $250 (your GF covers this)

doc = $450
your GF = $250

That seems fair to me. Propose that and see what the doc says.

The Lawyer road = too much time and too much money.
Pay for the thing, and get it over with.
Contact the local board, and write a letter to them about the dentist.
The End

dawndelion said: My dentist makes you sign a sheet before the root canal that says you understand that it's not guaranteed to work, etc. If that was the case, I would say she is lucky he admitted it and is paying for the fix, instead of just pointing to the waiver and saying she's SOL.

I would change dentist if presented with something like that to sign. Where is he located, WallyWorld?

Main lesson:
Never admit (or create impression on admission) anything. Do not try to be nice. Charge maximum and blame client for everything.

Mickie3 said: dawndelion said: My dentist makes you sign a sheet before the root canal that says you understand that it's not guaranteed to work, etc. If that was the case, I would say she is lucky he admitted it and is paying for the fix, instead of just pointing to the waiver and saying she's SOL.

I would change dentist if presented with something like that to sign. Where is he located, WallyWorld?


Actually this is seen in most qualified and organized dental offices.
The ones that dont make you sign informed consent forms, hippa forms, med forms, etc are the lousy ones from wallyworld.

root canals are not infinite. a poor one can fail in a few years, a good one can fail in 10 years (or more).

i've had both done. i'm bout to have to pay $1000 for a specialist (mostly not covered) to fix the poor one that is about 5 years old. i've had others done by another dentist which lasted longer.

and those done by the better dentist which the crown broke in less than a year (tough cookie!).

get dentures or something if you want them to last forever with a warranty

BrlDsguise said: Pun said: oopsz said: jrtang said: She's a full-time nursing student and can't afford a lawyer. She's not really one to sue for the sake of suing and really just doesn't want to pay more than she's obligated to. That's why I'm posting here. In a botched procedure, what is the the party at fault generally liable for? What is the victim obligated to pay?

A "botched procedure" is also known as malpractice. If you had called lawyers in your area, I'm sure you could have found one to give you a free consult, and they would have detailed your rights. Instead, you took his terms. Basically, you've already settled- in lieu of suing him, he's given you lots of free dental work.

If you had sued him, his malpractice insurance would have paid the claim, but it seems to me the dentist decided giving you free dental work was cheaper than his insurance rates going up. At this point, I don't think you're entitled to anything more than what you've got, because that's what you agreed to. You don't have anything left to bargain with.

(This is not legal advice. I am not your lawyer. Etc.)


ABSOLUTELY WRONG ADVICE
Botched procedure is not necessarily malpractice. Malpractice is when one knowingly caused a harmful damage without informing the patient. This dentist did everything RIGHT (except the procedure) by the book. This case will not even get reviewed by the boards/court.


So a doctor cannot unknowingly commit malpractice by not being careful enough?


Who said he wasn't careful? If he was not careful performing the procedure, that is malpractice.
I believe her dentist was careful with the procedure but ended up with a bad outcome (due to complications in accessing the canals and sealing them) If he was not careful with the procedure (intent to harm), he would not have told her of the bad outcome he had casued. He was professional about it and even offered alt treatment at no cost. How is this malpractice? Bring me an attorney who will take this case and call it a malpractice.


I do this for a living and see this exact same case every single day.
No attorney will take the case (unless the dentist admint he had wronged the patient) and no malpractice insurance company will issue a dime for this.

GreyRabbit said: 1)She is a nurse and will be soon making $400 per day. So what?
2)The doctor at least told her about what he did and not covered it up? Um, isn't that what you expect? You can't hold people who do the right think up to a higher standard. Many dentists who take pride in their work probably winced at your comment.
3)The root canal cost less then normal. Unless the dentist gave the OP's girlfriend a discount, the cost shouldn't be used in the context of "You got a discount/cheap root canal so you saved money and shouldn't complain."

Why do people bring up useless facts? The above 3 statements don't contribute anything to the discussion.

The person who suggested going to India to get the dental work done is obviously a genius. Why doesn't everyone just fly to India for the weekend and get all of their medical work done. Tickets are so cheap, and getting around by yourself is super easy. And you can always call the doctor up and ask questions or see him... What do you think would have happened had the OP's girlfriend went to India, had the root canal and the doctor there made the same error?

Pun, you seem to be very sure of your opinion and want the OP's girlfriend to follow it. Don't forget that one of the benefits of this message boards is conflicting opinions and debates about them. While the OP might very well do what you mentioned, hearing about other points of view will be beneficial for him. Also, you should mention that you are not a lawyer as far as legal advice(unless you are)

It seems like aside from FRAUDulently not telling the OP's girlfriend about his mistake and covering it up, the dentist is getting off with a very minimal cost. He is just paying for someone else to fix his mistake (work and materials minus the item he wants the GF to pay for) He isn't considering that the GF might have had to miss work or school, or have extra dental visits with more pain and inconvenience. So I'm not as agreeable with the comment that the dentist is doing the right thing. Personally, if I was in the dentists shoe's, I'd probobly pay for everything plus give the GF 1-2K. You also have to look at it from his point of view, no one is suying him, he isn't going to have to deal with lawyers, courts or insurance or any other problems that can potentially happen.

I think that the OP needs to explain exactly how the dentist messed up? This should be explained in the letter he gave her. He should at the very least show the letter to a dentist, or an authority in the field to see if it makes sense, and to understand what possible problems can come from this down the line. (Good call on future out of pocket STNick)
If the procedure was not satisfactory because the root canal was very complex and the dentist made a slight error, that scenario is a lot different then if the procedure as messed up because the dentist forgot to do something.

Different people have different attitudes. Some have the ambulance chaser mindset, while some seem to be more forgiving.

Advice summary: 1)Show the letter to another dental authority and have him explain it to you. 2)Speak to the dentist who put in the implant about possible damage that he could have seen and if anything was wrong. He may very well tell you that the problem with the root canal will be completely fixed with the implant. 3) Post results and figure out where to go from there.

-Grey


You bring up some good points, but here are some known facts in medical lawsuits.
Usually doctors don't give refunds or compensated amount for any failed procedures. This just means they admitted their mistake. Some ethical ones will write off the procedure amount and charge the alternative treatment avoiding any time consuming lawsuits (which usually ends up in their favor as long as they charted and did everything possible to perfom an ideal procedure).

No dentist or surgeon will comment on that letter. Doctors don't sue each other and also don't rat out on each other. Some do, but ends up not showing up in the court to testify.

I have been reading the info and first off to the OP, I'd have to say I'm sorry for the GF because in all this aside from the money part:

The dentist basically admitted he 'botched' the procedure. He knew somehow that it was not just a failed procedure. The gf lost a tooth. ( and I'm truly sorry for her. ) I've had braces and wisdom teeth removal but that was all planned. If my dentist screwed up and I lost any of my teeth now, no matter WHAT I promised to pay for what procedure I expect to be made whole. Not money but fix it so I don't have a problem years down the line. The idea was to save the tooth. He did worse than fail. Period. Somehow it just seems wrong to have to pay anything. Talk to the dentist. If the tables were turned - lets pull one of your teeth out and do a bridge/whatever - that tooth becomes priceless.

With that.. I better go brush as I just ate. Good luck.

I agree with those that said the dentist was reasonable in correcting his mistake. Far too many dentists would probably just slap a crown on and send you on your way. Then blame any future problems on someone else.

If anything, you at least got some gift ideas for your GF, Sonicare and a waterpik come to mind. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

bilbo777 said: I have been reading the info and first off to the OP, I'd have to say I'm sorry for the GF because in all this aside from the money part:

The dentist basically admitted he 'botched' the procedure. He knew somehow that it was not just a failed procedure. The gf lost a tooth. ( and I'm truly sorry for her. ) I've had braces and wisdom teeth removal but that was all planned. If my dentist screwed up and I lost any of my teeth now, no matter WHAT I promised to pay for what procedure I expect to be made whole. Not money but fix it so I don't have a problem years down the line. The idea was to save the tooth. He did worse than fail. Period. Somehow it just seems wrong to have to pay anything. Talk to the dentist. If the tables were turned - lets pull one of your teeth out and do a bridge/whatever - that tooth becomes priceless.

With that.. I better go brush as I just ate. Good luck.


I highly doubt the dentist actually said "I botched that RCT". Maybe OP can confirm but I am definite that it went something like "sorry, I tried doing the rct, but it's no longer restorable"
If the dentist did botch that procedure and told the gf everything that went wrong...he deserve to be sued.

This thread is unnecessarily getting long and let me put an end to it.
My brother is an attorney specializing in medical/dental law. I am a General/cosmetic dentist with two practices in NYC.
I occasionally goto court to testify on behalf of some dentist as a witness expert for my brother.
Please dont PM about your personal dental dilema or any legal advice.
My rate is $1500 per court appearance upon acceptance of the case, in case if you ever need me

Pun said: This thread is unnecessarily getting long and let me put an end to it.
My brother is an attorney specializing in medical/dental law. I am a General/cosmetic dentist with two practices in NYC.
I occasionally goto court to testify on behalf of some dentist as a witness expert for my brother.
Please dont PM about your personal dental dilema or any legal advice.
My rate is $1500 per court appearance upon acceptance of the case, in case if you ever need me

I'm just curious. Does this mean that your testimony is always in favor of the dentist rather than the patient? If so, then do you think the patient ever has a valid case, or do you just leave the legal judgments to your brother and assume that his assessment is always correct?

I know these are personal questions, but you broached the subject in the first place.

glxpass said: Pun said: This thread is unnecessarily getting long and let me put an end to it.
My brother is an attorney specializing in medical/dental law. I am a General/cosmetic dentist with two practices in NYC.
I occasionally goto court to testify on behalf of some dentist as a witness expert for my brother.
Please dont PM about your personal dental dilema or any legal advice.
My rate is $1500 per court appearance upon acceptance of the case, in case if you ever need me

I'm just curious. Does this mean that your testimony is always in favor of the dentist rather than the patient? If so, then do you think the patient ever has a valid case, or do you just leave the legal judgments to your brother and assume that his assessment is always correct?

I know these are personal questions, but you broached the subject in the first place.


I testify for the dentist who had done no wrong. This is why I said "upon acceptance of the case". There are cases I find in favor of the patient, and in such case, we let the dentist know it's in their best interest to settle.

Attorneys always take their client side. They ask for my professional opinion and I provide one either in the patient's favor or the dentist's. I only make court apperances for the dentist though.

To be honest, regardless of who is at guilt, my brother will always take his client as his own son.

what time do you go to a Chinese dentist?

tooth-hurtee.

I don't see why you dont agree to pay the $500 and if it costs more have him agree to pick up the cost. Maybe a couple free cleanings and such for all the wasted time. But it seems to me that the dentist is trying to do the right thing here and get her tooth fixed while costing her the same she would have paid out of pocket.

rigor said: root canals are not infinite. a poor one can fail in a few years, a good one can fail in 10 years (or more).

i've had both done. i'm bout to have to pay $1000 for a specialist (mostly not covered) to fix the poor one that is about 5 years old. i've had others done by another dentist which lasted longer.

and those done by the better dentist which the crown broke in less than a year (tough cookie!).

get dentures or something if you want them to last forever with a warranty


Yeah.. ummm dental work doesn't come with a warranty, and dentures are about the worst option.



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