USPS Insurance Claim

Archived From: Finance
  • Go to page :
  • 1 2
  • Text Only
USPS damaged my server during shipping. I filed claim, I never got any response. One year ago, I shipped a laptop to someone as gift, but never reach to the person. I have tracking# on the receipt, but the tracking # can't be find in USPS system, filed claim, but no response again. Now, I don't use USPS anymore except regular letters.

nycll said: parquedematthew said: nycll said: davef139 said: nycll said: parquedematthew said: Lesson learned: Ship everything FedEx/UPS in the future. It may cost you a bit more but you get insurance up to $100 free and true tracking.Registered mail is more reliable than Fedex/UPS.
Registered mail isn't too practical as the value was around $100, that alone is $11 charge in addition to postage. Is an extra 11% practical? No
I was speaking in general terms, just about reliability. For OP's balls, obviously he should have sent it with signature requirement.


Signature confirmation would only guarantee a signature (including if it was delivered to the wrong address). I've never had USPS check my ID for a signature confirmation.
And fedex and ups ask for your ID?


FedEx always seems to ask for the name of the person signing (at least when they don't know the person) so you would have to know that the package they were mistakenly handing you was for someone else and their name. Not a guarantee but it's alot better than just "sign this, thanks". Also, filing a claim with FedEx for $100 or less is almost too easy. Given that the value of the OP's shipment was $90, he would've been covered for the item cost plus the cost of shipping. I should know, just received a claims check yesterday for a legitimately lost item. There's no way you're going to convince me that USPS is better than FedEx or UPS for shipping. At least with those two, I can still call up and talk to a live person and a person that gives a damn at that.

fixfox69 said: The USPS Insurance is a scam - I'm not aware of anyone who received a single dime for insured package issues. Learned that lesson early.
Forget Insurance - your first line of defense is Tracking. Second and more effective (and expensive) is Signature Required.
(I ship approx. 400 packages/year).


I got insurance for a damaged item once. However, they wanted me to ship the other $800 worth of items to them with the $200 they damaged. I told them, why so you can damage that too? Anyway, I finally got a check but it is near impossible. The other person must have the original receipt for purchase and the blue receipt that came off the label. The person that files the claim must have it not the shipper. Etc. Etc. They make it as hard as possible, it is slow, and they fight you at every turn. So while I did get lucky once you are much better shipping UPS or Fedex. They are a lot better about claims.

The package was either stolen or dropped off at the wrong house.

I used to work/manage a USPS retail counter at a contact unit.

Insurance barcodes/numbers CANNOT be checked online. Only confirmation or tracking services can be checked online.

Delivery or Signature Confirmation, Certified Mail, and Registered Mail offer CONFIRMATION of delivery and can be checked online. (Only guaranteed a scan at delivery)
Express Mail offers TRACKING and can be checked online. (Point-to-point delivery scans)

USPS does a delivery scan of Insured Mail up to $200 (black label) BUT the scan data is not customer-accessible, i.e. you need someone with access to a POS ONE system to check the delivery status. Insured Mail over $200 (blue label) gets a delivery scan and a signature, but again, the scan data is NOT customer-accessible.

If it's important enough to insure, declare a value over $200 so that it requires a signature. You can declare any amount of insurance (e.g. insure a $100 pen for $5000) but USPS will only pay out an approved claim for what you can show proof of value for. It's only about $2 more to get the "signature required" insurance, and it gives you a better shot at a claim because it's the carrier's responsibility until he/she gets a signature.

Bear in mind that generally anyone at the address/residence can sign for a mailpiece, though you can get restricted delivery which requires the addressee to sign for it; it's $4.50 though, and you're more likely to have a <=$200 insured mailpiece grow legs than someone intercept a mailpiece requiring a signature.

fixfox69 said: The USPS Insurance is a scam - I'm not aware of anyone who received a single dime for insured package issues. Learned that lesson early.
Forget Insurance - your first line of defense is Tracking. Second and more effective (and expensive) is Signature Required.
(I ship approx. 400 packages/year).


I received payment for my claim from USPS just a month ago very promptly. I bought a scanner from eBay, which was shipped thru USPS with insurance. The scanner was dead on arrival and the seller (who had a decent eBay rating)insisted that it must have been damaged while in transit. Even though I was not conviced as the scanner had no visible outside damage (it had a small piece broken loose beneath scanning glass though), I filed the claim as advised by the seller (attached a photo of the scanner with the online claim) and I got paid in three weeks.

thefunch said: I used to work/manage a USPS retail counter at a contact unit.

Insurance barcodes/numbers CANNOT be checked online. Only confirmation or tracking services can be checked online.

Delivery or Signature Confirmation, Certified Mail, and Registered Mail offer CONFIRMATION of delivery and can be checked online. (Only guaranteed a scan at delivery)
Express Mail offers TRACKING and can be checked online. (Point-to-point delivery scans)

USPS does a delivery scan of Insured Mail up to $200 (black label) BUT the scan data is not customer-accessible, i.e. you need someone with access to a POS ONE system to check the delivery status. Insured Mail over $200 (blue label) gets a delivery scan and a signature, but again, the scan data is NOT customer-accessible.

If it's important enough to insure, declare a value over $200 so that it requires a signature. You can declare any amount of insurance (e.g. insure a $100 pen for $5000) but USPS will only pay out an approved claim for what you can show proof of value for. It's only about $2 more to get the "signature required" insurance, and it gives you a better shot at a claim because it's the carrier's responsibility until he/she gets a signature.

Bear in mind that generally anyone at the address/residence can sign for a mailpiece, though you can get restricted delivery which requires the addressee to sign for it; it's $4.50 though, and you're more likely to have a <=$200 insured mailpiece grow legs than someone intercept a mailpiece requiring a signature.


Green for explaining exactly why we should not use the USPS insurance. There are at least 4 things in your statements that are just irrating about the service offered and I know that you have no control over it.

I know I ran into your "insure a $100 pen for $5000". I sold a collectible on eBay and insured it for $300. They wanted to know what I paid for it. I responded that it didn't matter, the buyer paid me $300 and you lost it but they kept insisting on a receipt and a date of purchase. I ended up doctoring a receipt of an eBay auction showing that I paid $300 for the item less than a year ago.

Like I said earlier, never again. Also the level of cost of the sub-par insurance bothers me. To have a $100 package insured and signed for it will cost you about $7.50.

strongreader said: Wow, I didn't realize how lucky I was last year when an iphone I sold on eBay got "lost". The package was scanned as received by USPS but never delivered. I filed a claim and after about 2 1/2 months, they paid me back $460 (had to provide them with my eBay invoice).

Same here, I mailed an iPhone (sold for $200). It wasn't delivered, and the Delivery Confirmation record showed it as still being in the post office of departure. No-one at the post office had any idea where it was.

After reading these comments, I guess I was blessed that I was able to file a claim after 21 days (along with proof of shipment and eBay receipt) and get a check mailed to me in 2 weeks - for the value of the lost item and shipping fees I paid to USPS.

If you truly, absolutely CANNOT afford to lose the item being sent, then mail it FedEx.
In no way do I think FedEx is the picture of perfection, but I've heard the least amount of lost/damage complaints from friends who have used them.



Disclaimer: By providing links to other sites, FatWallet.com does not guarantee, approve or endorse the information or products available at these sites, nor does a link indicate any association with or endorsement by the linked site to FatWallet.com.

Thanks for visiting FatWallet.com. Join for free to remove this ad.

TRUSTe online privacy certification

While FatWallet makes every effort to post correct information, offers are subject to change without notice.
Some exclusions may apply based upon merchant policies.
© 1999-2014