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I held a few batches of stock in a publicly traded company that was acquired. All of the stock quote resources I can find seem to have purged all history on the acquired stock. Google and bing searches have turned up a few related hits, but nothing that has worked. This stock's former exchange was nasdaq, and their site doesn't offer the info either.

http://wiki.answers.com/Q/How_can_you_find_historical_stock_quot... suggests "DataStream Advance", a subscription service. As the link suggests, it looks like many universities subscribe, but even those appear to severely limit access to some faculty and students, and from a limited physical location on campus.
I've tried etrade, yahoo, marketwatch, no history on any of them.

In my case, the "defunct" company survives under a new parent, so I may be able to get the information from them. But they're on holiday until tomorrow, and this seemed like something others may have dealt with too.

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I assume your goal is to tender the shares and get whatever they're worth, rather than just find out the price. To achieve that, you'll need to contact the stock's transfer agent. The transfer agent is the company which handles recordkeeping of what shares are outstanding and where they are.

The name of the transfer agent is printed on your stock certificates. Most of them have a service where you can submit a request for them to research such issues through their website for free.

No, it's to find my cost basis. The shares were all sold at the time of acquisition, so I've already gotten what they were worth then. I'll see if I kept scans of the certificates for transfer agent information.

SlimTim said: No, it's to find my cost basis. The shares were all sold at the time of acquisition, so I've already gotten what they were worth then. I'll see if I kept scans of the certificates for transfer agent information.
Sorry for the misunderstanding - no, the transfer agent won't be able to help you with that.

There are a number of services out there that will find a historical price for you. E.g., here's one that charges $20 per quote. If you live in a good-sized city, there's a good chance that your local library will have newspaper archives where you could look up the information yourself.

SlimTim said: No, it's to find my cost basis. The shares were all sold at the time of acquisition, so I've already gotten what they were worth then. I'll see if I kept scans of the certificates for transfer agent information.
If you posted the former ticker symbol and the date you needed the quote for, maybe someone on FWF with access to such a service could get you the quote.

Did you try looking for it on bigcharts.com ?

Thanks, everyone. Bigcharts.com doesn't list them, either. I found a few places with a promising UI like theirs - supply a ticker symbol and date in the past, but like them it just complains the ticker is not found.

I'll try contacting the acquiring company. I'm just surprised that all the financial info providers are apparently so quick to purge this small bit of information. It seems like it would be nearly as useful as the historical info for an active ticker symbol.

What often happens is the company's ticker changes when they go bankrupt. Try searching on big charts a bit more using the company name.

An example would be nortel networks, their previous ticker was NT (i believe). Now its OTC:NRTLQ

ThePessimist said: There are a number of services out there that will find a historical price for you. E.g., here's one that charges $20 per quote. If you live in a good-sized city, there's a good chance that your local library will have newspaper archives where you could look up the information yourself.

Until three or four years ago, virtually all newspapers published stock tickers in the daily newspaper. So even a modest-sized library that has newspaper on microfilm should work.



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