How to have kids the FatWallet way?

Archived From: Finance
  • Go to page :
  • 1 2345
  • Text Only
Voting History
rated:
So how does one have kids the FatWallet way? Any savings techniques, expense management etc of having children people would like to share?

Member Summary
Most Recent Posts
We also had a doula for my daughter's birth... which definitely reduced the chances she would be a c-section (the birth ... (more)

erinm (Jul. 19, 2010 @ 3:01p) |

bump

geo123 (Aug. 31, 2010 @ 4:34p) |

bump?

redpomidor (Sep. 28, 2010 @ 5:48p) |

Drop any illusion that spending money shows your love. Your time and attention matter far more than anything else. This goes for the schools they go to, the house they live in, the car you drive, the vacations you take. Kids literally have no idea if they're being spoiled with that stuff or not, but they sure can tell the difference between parents who spend time with them or not.

If you can comfortably afford "luxuries" in that stuff, then great. But if they will cause any hardship or even worry, it's not worth it. Giving your kids happy and stress-free parents is a tremendous gift. -SlimTim

______________________________________________________________

Breastfeed. Formula costs at least $100 per month.

Generic diapers. Find a type that fits/works - then figure out where you can get it. For example, CVS, Target, and a local grocery store all carry diapers made by the same manufacturer for their house brands. Was always able to save that way. For more savings? Cloth diaper.

Don't be afraid to use hand-me-downs. It has cut our clothing costs immensely. We have a really good base of clothes to start with, then there isn't much I need to buy to round out the wardrobe.

Make your own baby food with whatever is on sale in the produce section. Sweet potatoes are $.49/pound. Bake them, smooth them out in the food processor, and add water to desired consistency. (Super Baby Foods book is a GREAT one to check out of library).

Recognize that most things will pass very quickly. No need to have a gadget to answer every problem. Make do with what you already have, and in a few months, you won't even remember what you thought you needed or why.

The library and other local things are one of the best sources of entertainment -- and can cost nothing. We take advantage of museum free days for fun.

Figure out how to entertain the kids on your own -- I created a "summer camp" last year for my 3 and 5 year olds. I picked a topic, we read books about it, designed a free field trip around it, and watched a movie, if possible. (Bees - The Bee Movie, some fiction and non fiction little kid books, a local nature center with a working bee hive, worksheets free from online to color bees, honey taste-tested, then to cook with, going out in the yard with the digital camera to try to catch one on film) that's just one example.

A previous poster already said this -- but having kids isn't about spending more. It doesn't take more classes, better clothes, and more toys to create a smarter or better kid. It does take your attention, time, and creativity. Sidewalk chalk, bubbles, a bike, and a kiddie pool are some of the best things for summer - and don't cost much. - onetwo3

______________________________________________________________

Having kids is going to cost you a bundle any way you look at it but here are some things that have helped. I'll try not to repeat the things onetwo3 said, but I agree with their post:

1. The summer before the first one comes scour garage sales for baby stuff. No I don't mean buy unsafe cribs or used car seats, but there is a ton of baby / kid stuff that goes for pennies. Surprisingly, I've had the best luck for cheap quality used stuff in poor neighborhoods -- I only briefly pondered why poor people are selling expensive stuff for pennies, and people in better neighborhoods tend to say, "I paid 20 dollars for that baby outfit and she never wore it so I'm not going to take a quarter!" Bargain furiously. I usually tell them that I am pregnant and on a budget and I could really use the items.

2. Teach your kids that new does not mean better. My kids receive quality used toys that I have bought from garage sales and they enjoyed them just as much as if I'd purchased them new.

3 Organize! get all your clothes and toys grouped together by size and gender.

4. For items that you want to buy new (such as a car seat) you should let friends and relatives who want to buy you something purchase that for you.

5. I did cloth diapers for my first (not using a diaper service) and it wasn't that bad. But then 23 months later the twins came and I gave up. Diapers at Costco. Or use coupons, double coupons, combined with sales and 10 off 50 safeway coupons...

6. Teach your kids to like basic healthy food. My husband is from West Africa so we eat a lot of sauces with rice or his traditional dishes. I make them a little healthier by increasing the veggies and decreasing the oil and salt. I tell my kids that we can only do fast food when it's on sale, which isn't very often.

7. Teach your kids to not beg for stuff at the store. If they throw a fit then leave your cart and take them directly home and tell them their store privileges are gone. This might sound harsh but stores are counting on you to give in to begging and they put the kid stuff at a low level.

8. I got my mom to do day care for me. Blessing of a lifetime.

9. I really do prefer private schools but the bills got too overwhelming so I found the best public school and figured out how to do a school transfer. I was persistent and on waiting lists and we didn't get the call until August, but I'll be darned if it didn't work.

10. For every expensive thing to do there is an equally fun cheap thing to do. Chuck e cheese with coupons and don't buy the pizza. The public park. Swimming lessons though the Parks department. Hiking and camping.

11. My kids can watch PBS and videos and that's it. There's no merchandise commercials in them. When Kyle was four he asked Santa for "an ice cream machine, a snow maker and a paper bag he can turn into a puppet and that's all." Imagine his list if he had been watching all the cartoons that are about merchandising products to kids.

12. Onetwo3 said it, but don't be afraid of letting people know that you would like hand me downs. Take everything with great enthusiasm and then pass on what you don't want. When my son needed new pants I sent an email to several people who had given me clothes before and I said, "Do you happen to have any size 6 pants that your kids have outgrown? I thought I'd ask before I'd take the kids to the store." And sure enough, pants arrived.

13. Teach kids about money early. I often say, "Yes we can afford it but I'm choosing to spend my money on other things that I think are a better value."

14. Teach them to take care of their stuff.

15. Pictures at JCPenny with coupon for 3.99 a picture and no sitting fee. If you think you are going to give in to all the extra pictures they take and try to to sell you for a ton of money, then start being an amateur photographer. - luvbugium

______________________________________________________________

I know it's not always possible, but depaneding on the fields of work you are in, having one switch to an evening shift is great. My wife works evenings and I work days. My wife only works 3 days a week, and we have no daycare costs. The best part is that I spend solo time with my kids that I think A LOT of dads miss out on.

Secondly, It's all about the routines you get used to. Both my kids are under 2, and I get them to bed, alone, with no problems.

______________________________________________________________
Thanks for visiting FatWallet.com. Join for free to remove this ad.

It's impossible.

get them adopted by a wealthy family.
if you work this out before the birth, you can have not only the medical bills paid, but also all prenatal medical care and work in a stipend to ensure the baby and mother are healthy.
work out liberal vistiation rights once they are potty trained. visit them often and go on vacations together on their dime, not to mention their private jet.
after they are through college on the adopted silver spoon plan, tell the child how much you love them, and regret doing the adoption thing.

you gave them a better life than the one you could have provided, and probably made money on the deal.

I think kids is the one area where a FWFer shouldn't sacrifice to save a buck. It costs money to build a child's future, and you should never bargain with the future of your offspring to save a buck if it's not worth it. Most of the time, it isn't.

Paying 10% more for day care in a month for your child to be in a better environment is worth it, for example. They'll be healthier, happier, and will probably be more social.

therivler1 said: It's impossible.
If you adopt, you save the expenses involved in the pregnancy and childbirth.

/of course adoption often has other expenses.

About a month before our first was born, Wal-greens had their store brand diapers on sale and, when coupled with coupons, we ended up getting 5 jumbo-size packs of diapers for ~$.25 total. Yes, you are reading that right, a quarter for 5 packs of diapers. It was like an adventure hitting up all Wal-greens in our area. You don't realize how many drug-stores there are within ~5-10 mile radius of your house until you look. It was a lot of fun and we saved a bunch of money doing it. We went nearly a year before we had to buy more diapers.

On a side note, the store brand diapers were just a good as Huggies or Pampers.

borrow your niece and/or nephew for the day. Ask them to call you mom/dad and destroy everything you own. This will give you a good taste of parenthood for a fraction of the cost.

Get busy now, so you can have the baby in late December and get the tax deduction as if you'd had the kid all year.


Drop any illusion that spending money shows your love. Your time and attention matter far more than anything else. This goes for the schools they go to, the house they live in, the car you drive, the vacations you take. Kids literally have no idea if they're being spoiled with that stuff or not, but they sure can tell the difference between parents who spend time with them or not.

If you can comfortably afford "luxuries" in that stuff, then great. But if they will cause any hardship or even worry, it's not worth it. Giving your kids happy and stress-free parents is a tremendous gift.

I have two children as a stepfather, and my niece nearly burnt my house to the ground. How is that for the FWF way? It isn't possible really. That HSA you took to rack up the deductions? All spent when your child plays sick at school -you have to take them to the doctor then- or have truancy courts up your butt.

To save for college, put money in a grandparent 529, or put in parents'/kids' Roth IRAs. Preference for FAFSA.

We should all be thankful it seems, that there was no FWF say, 25 yrs ago...

DTASFAB said: Get a vasectomy as quickly as possible.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/i-really-regret-it-i-really-regret-having-children/article784948/


While I'm not exactly wild about the idea of procreating, IMO the real problem for the woman that article is about is that she's a crappy parent and a lousy human being. Here are some of her reasons for not having kids:

15. You become an ally of capitalism.
23. Families: They are horror and cruelty.
29. School: a prison camp with which you'll have to make a pact.
35. When the child appears, the father disappears.
37. Your child will be in constant danger from pedophiles and pornographers.

What an idiot.

fixfox69 said: We should all be thankful it seems, that there was no FWF say, 25 yrs ago...

Exactly. From the responses on here, you'd think the best decision is to be selfish and don't have kids. Wait... I think someone already wrote a book detailing the result if everyone followed that advice.

jmackdaddy said: fixfox69 said: We should all be thankful it seems, that there was no FWF say, 25 yrs ago...

Exactly. From the responses on here, you'd think the best decision is to be selfish and don't have kids. Wait... I think someone already wrote a book detailing the result if everyone followed that advice.


LOL, Pat Buchanan. That's one step above citing David Duke.

jmackdaddy said: fixfox69 said: We should all be thankful it seems, that there was no FWF say, 25 yrs ago...

Exactly. From the responses on here, you'd think the best decision is to be selfish and don't have kids. Wait... I think someone already wrote a book detailing the result if everyone followed that advice.


I think you miss the point. I didn't actively plan for my children, and if we are being honest, I regret not taking the steps necessary to prevent having them when I did. If I knew me all those years ago I would have strongly suggested 2 forms of simultaneous birth control (you know, instead of my 0 forms...). They have drained me physically, emotionally, and financially; and I was in no way ready to have them.

Do I think that /no one/ should have kids? Absolutely not.

I think people shouldn't have kids until they are ready for them emotionally and are willing to spend the ludicrous amounts of lucre required to do so properly.

Ray

Sell them cross border for fun and profit.

You people are hilarious. Especially because i used to think EXACTLY like you do about kids.

Now that i have one, I wish I was a polygamist so I could have FIFTY.

Let me explain this to you in as few words as possible.

When my son is sitting across the table from me at dinner. HE IS ME.


He eats, laughs, sleeps, talks, burps, interrupts, jumps, even dumps, etc. JUST LIKE ME.

How better in life is THAT!!!

Our country/civilization is TRULY in trouble as the people who should be having kids are having 1 or none and those that.... maybe should not be parents are having 12.

You people are truly missing out. And, FWIW, You can only screw so many skanks. (beleive me I tried and succeeded)

And, FYI, i did not have a kid at 18-23, and he was planned. Maybe that makes a difference.

I don't know about children the FWF way, but here are the top 5 FWF techniques you definitely want to avoid in regards to having children:

5) Looking on Craigslist or Freecycle
4) Buying online
3) Downloading someone else's coupon
2) Buying refurbished
1) Using a buy one get one free coupon

Be careful in accepting free samples, sometimes you have to buy after.

-Greyrabbit

Fatwallet guys get laid?

ppatin said: jmackdaddy said: fixfox69 said: We should all be thankful it seems, that there was no FWF say, 25 yrs ago...

Exactly. From the responses on here, you'd think the best decision is to be selfish and don't have kids. Wait... I think someone already wrote a book detailing the result if everyone followed that advice.


LOL, Pat Buchanan. That's one step above citing David Duke.


Pat Buchanan is STRANGELY . . . accurate. He is explaining how in many European countries Italy (especially italy) and many western cultures immigrants are having 3-4 times as many children as non-immigrants. It means Italy will not be filled with people who speak Italian in 30 years.

Its like New Orleans is now being filed with spanish speakers. THERE IS NOTHING wrong with this, but its french heritage will soon be a just note in the history books.

RS4Rings said: Fatwallet guys get laid?

You are not the only one here with a dope ride.

ARBITRAGE! The chinese put a premium on sons, and discount on the daughters. So export boys and import girls, so we can have kids and dent the trade deficit at the same time.

To answer your question ---

Figure out what things you can buy that will safely meet your needs. For example - you don't ever really need a high chair, if you don't feed the baby solid foods until 6 months of age. A booster seat, strapped onto a kitchen char will work great. There are also more supportive "high chairs" that strap onto a chair like this. Buy used when possible -- then when reselling, you might be able to recoup your total expense. I did this on several items, when I learned I was having twins. Exersaucers, bouncer seats, swings ... are all over the place at garage sales, and often in great condition, as they're only used for a few months.

But last year's model on many things for savings, strollers especially. 50% off to have "last year's" colors/prints. (beware on carseats - they expire - not a place to get something outdated)

don't mess with nursery bedding, unless it really makes you happy. The only thing you need are crib sheets and mattress pads. Blankets for swaddling.


Breastfeed. Formula costs at least $100 per month.

Generic diapers. Find a type that fits/works - then figure out where you can get it. For example, CVS, Target, and a local grocery store all carry diapers made by the same manufacturer for their house brands. Was always able to save that way. For more savings? Cloth diaper.

Don't be afraid to use hand-me-downs. It has cut our clothing costs immensely. We have a really good base of clothes to start with, then there isn't much I need to buy to round out the wardrobe.

Make your own baby food with whatever is on sale in the produce section. Sweet potatoes are $.49/pound. Bake them, smooth them out in the food processor, and add water to desired consistency. (Super Baby Foods book is a GREAT one to check out of library).

Recognize that most things will pass very quickly. No need to have a gadget to answer every problem. Make do with what you already have, and in a few months, you won't even remember what you thought you needed or why.

The library and other local things are one of the best sources of entertainment -- and can cost nothing. We take advantage of museum free days for fun.

Figure out how to entertain the kids on your own -- I created a "summer camp" last year for my 3 and 5 year olds. I picked a topic, we read books about it, designed a free field trip around it, and watched a movie, if possible. (Bees - The Bee Movie, some fiction and non fiction little kid books, a local nature center with a working bee hive, worksheets free from online to color bees, honey taste-tested, then to cook with, going out in the yard with the digital camera to try to catch one on film) that's just one example.

A previous poster already said this -- but having kids isn't about spending more. It doesn't take more classes, better clothes, and more toys to create a smarter or better kid. It does take your attention, time, and creativity. Sidewalk chalk, bubbles, a bike, and a kiddie pool are some of the best things for summer - and don't cost much.

RS4Rings said: Fatwallet guys get laid?By the hour, or for FWF, by the minutes.

just adopt a couple on facebook
if they start posting too much or if they dont help you with your farm, just delete them right away

patch96 said: RS4Rings said: Fatwallet guys get laid?

You are not the only one here with a dope ride.


Yeah I got me a 98 Crown Vic too baby, I am having mega kids - setting up FW franchises
Have dem babiez at the end of the year - max the tax deduct. Also you can only write off 5k per year in care expense if you have two else its 3500? So try to spread them apart. However they may get along better, from time to time, if they are close in age.

RailroadTrack said: I think kids is the one area where a FWFer shouldn't sacrifice to save a buck. It costs money to build a child's future, and you should never bargain with the future of your offspring to save a buck if it's not worth it. Most of the time, it isn't.

Paying 10% more for day care in a month for your child to be in a better environment is worth it, for example. They'll be healthier, happier, and will probably be more social.


It's all about value, isn't it? I say that this is EXACTLY the FWF way.

Additionally, I recommend not using daycare, and instead having the actual parents raise the kids if possible.

SleekWallet said: just adopt a couple on facebook
if they start posting too much or if they dont help you with your farm, just delete them right away



LMAO!!!11

SlimTim said: Drop any illusion that spending money shows your love. Your time and attention matter far more than anything else. This goes for the schools they go to, the house they live in, the car you drive, the vacations you take. Kids literally have no idea if they're being spoiled with that stuff or not, but they sure can tell the difference between parents who spend time with them or not.

If you can comfortably afford "luxuries" in that stuff, then great. But if they will cause any hardship or even worry, it's not worth it. Giving your kids happy and stress-free parents is a tremendous gift.


Well said.

redpomidor said: So how does one have kids the FatWallet way? Any savings techniques, expense management etc of having children people would like to share?

Um... buy and use Fatwallet condoms?

RS4Rings said: Fatwallet guys get laid?
What else do you think they spend their money on? They don't do AORs to buy more external hard drives. You can only have so many TBs. You can never get enough BJs.

Oh, and I can't believe nobody mentioned the only true FWF way to have kids: selling your sperm.

1. Sell your sperm
2. ???
2 (revised). Let someone else get pregnant and raise the kids
3. Profit!

Aflac

Having kids is going to cost you a bundle any way you look at it but here are some things that have helped. I'll try not to repeat the things onetwo3 said, but I agree with their post:

1. The summer before the first one comes scour garage sales for baby stuff. No I don't mean buy unsafe cribs or used car seats, but there is a ton of baby / kid stuff that goes for pennies. Surprisingly, I've had the best luck for cheap quality used stuff in poor neighborhoods -- I only briefly pondered why poor people are selling expensive stuff for pennies, and people in better neighborhoods tend to say, "I paid 20 dollars for that baby outfit and she never wore it so I'm not going to take a quarter!" Bargain furiously. I usually tell them that I am pregnant and on a budget and I could really use the items.

2. Teach your kids that new does not mean better. My kids receive quality used toys that I have bought from garage sales and they enjoyed them just as much as if I'd purchased them new.

3 Organize! get all your clothes and toys grouped together by size and gender.

4. For items that you want to buy new (such as a car seat) you should let friends and relatives who want to buy you something purchase that for you.

5. I did cloth diapers for my first (not using a diaper service) and it wasn't that bad. But then 23 months later the twins came and I gave up. Diapers at Costco. Or use coupons, double coupons, combined with sales and 10 off 50 safeway coupons...

6. Teach your kids to like basic healthy food. My husband is from West Africa so we eat a lot of sauces with rice or his traditional dishes. I make them a little healthier by increasing the veggies and decreasing the oil and salt. I tell my kids that we can only do fast food when it's on sale, which isn't very often.

7. Teach your kids to not beg for stuff at the store. If they throw a fit then leave your cart and take them directly home and tell them their store privileges are gone. This might sound harsh but stores are counting on you to give in to begging and they put the kid stuff at a low level.

8. I got my mom to do day care for me. Blessing of a lifetime.

9. I really do prefer private schools but the bills got too overwhelming so I found the best public school and figured out how to do a school transfer. I was persistent and on waiting lists and we didn't get the call until August, but I'll be darned if it didn't work.

10. For every expensive thing to do there is an equally fun cheap thing to do. Chuck e cheese with coupons and don't buy the pizza. The public park. Swimming lessons though the Parks department. Hiking and camping.

11. My kids can watch PBS and videos and that's it. There's no merchandise commercials in them. When Kyle was four he asked Santa for "an ice cream machine, a snow maker and a paper bag he can turn into a puppet and that's all." Imagine his list if he had been watching all the cartoons that are about merchandising products to kids.

12. Onetwo3 said it, but don't be afraid of letting people know that you would like hand me downs. Take everything with great enthusiasm and then pass on what you don't want. When my son needed new pants I sent an email to several people who had given me clothes before and I said, "Do you happen to have any size 6 pants that your kids have outgrown? I thought I'd ask before I'd take the kids to the store." And sure enough, pants arrived.

13. Teach kids about money early. I often say, "Yes we can afford it but I'm choosing to spend my money on other things that I think are a better value."

14. Teach them to take care of their stuff.

15. Pictures at JCPenny with coupon for 3.99 a picture and no sitting fee. If you think you are going to give in to all the extra pictures they take and try to to sell you for a ton of money, then start being an amateur photographer.

I think having kids the Fatwallet way is buying condoms from DealExtreme for $.05 each and having them break then you have a kid... but remember you only paid $.05 for the condom hah.

Let's see some pics of the potential mom and we will get back to you.

GreyRabbit said: I don't know about children the FWF way, but here are the top 5 FWF techniques you definitely want to avoid in regards to having children:

1) Using a buy one get one free coupon

-Greyrabbit


That happened to me. I thought we were done at 3 but it's TWINS!

kamalktk said: therivler1 said: It's impossible.
If you adopt, you save the expenses involved in the pregnancy and childbirth.

/of course adoption often has other expenses.
which are sometime footed by your employer.

Skipping 144 Messages...
bump?



Disclaimer: By providing links to other sites, FatWallet.com does not guarantee, approve or endorse the information or products available at these sites, nor does a link indicate any association with or endorsement by the linked site to FatWallet.com.

Thanks for visiting FatWallet.com. Join for free to remove this ad.

TRUSTe online privacy certification

While FatWallet makes every effort to post correct information, offers are subject to change without notice.
Some exclusions may apply based upon merchant policies.
© 1999-2014