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The weekly Big Lots ad has R134A Freon in 12 oz cans for $5. The Big Lots in Omaha is 10 miles away so I took the ad which came in Sundays paper to Oreillys Auto Parts and they matched the price. Current price @ Oreillys, Auto Zone and American Auto Parts is $10 for the same thing.

http://www.biglots.com/Specials/item.aspx?cid=15&scid=49&iid=805...

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pjrxj said =
Even though it is a "closed" system, freon and refrigerant do wear out over
time and need to be replaced a... (more)

Cajun (Jun. 18, 2010 @ 6:57a) |

A little guidance please:
My 95 Jeep GC was blowing warm air.
Hooked up the pressure gauge, and it read <20 psi (empty?).
I... (more)

SpinControl (Jun. 22, 2010 @ 11:36p) |

It's been *YEARS* since I messed with this, but since it's also been 48 hours with no replies to your questions, I thoug... (more)

TakeTheActive (Jun. 25, 2010 @ 12:19a) |

Quick Summary is created and edited by users like you... Add FAQ's, Links and other Relevant Information by clicking the edit button in the lower right hand corner of this message.
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Warm deal. The Big Lots in Billings, MT isn't too far away, but O'Reilly's and Napa are closer, so I'll see if they'll PM. Thanks, OP.

Cold deal...it's freon.

Yes, these are cheap. But you can do some damage overcharging your system and end up spending a lot of money. You need to have a decent set gauges at the very least IMO.

pjrxj said: Cold deal...it's freon.

Technically, it's not freon. Freon is the old stuff.

Here is how to put it in if you want to do it yourself.

http://www.freeonlineautorepair.com/recharge_ford_taurus_air_conditioner.html

You don't need a decent set of gauges, most people couldn't read a real gauge setup anyway, just use a setup like what is in the video above.

If you don't want to put it in yourself pay someone to do it for you and give them the cans to use, or just sweat your fanny off for another day.

jwichmann5 said: Here is how to put it in if you want to do it yourself.

http://www.freeonlineautorepair.com/recharge_ford_taurus_air_con...

You don't need a decent set of gauges, most people couldn't read a real gauge setup anyway, just use a setup like what is in the video above.

If you don't want to put it in yourself pay someone to do it for you and give them the cans to use, or just sweat your fanny off for another day.


LOL on sweating the fanny part. Also, if they system is low on refigerant, chances are, it needs more than just refrigerant. But you can put some in as a test. And if it is very slow leak (both my cars have this) it may stay in there all summer. But if you overfill it and start blowing seals, prepare to spend big $ depending on where the seals are that start leaking.

.


This is a cheap, simple and easy thing to do WITHOUT GAUGES as long
as you buy the right equipment and follow directions.

It's shameful how much a shop charges to do this.

Don't ever let a shop put any gas in your car without watching them
carefully. In modern cars, you seldom have to add gas to you A/C.
For God's sake, don't let them tell you that you need to change the
gas periodically either.

If a A/C repair man comes to your house, and fixes your A/C, that
doesn't mean that you need gas in it also. The typical A/C repair man,
will always manage to charge you for putting gas in your A/C that you
don't need. Opps! there goes another $35-$45. Those bas...ds.

Cajun


.

the price is painted right on the cans. either it's really old stock or the new permanent price? they have a ton of them!

And if you are really worried, you can rent a decent set of gauges for free at Autozone (or about $40 at Harbor Freight when they are on sale, but I think it's an overkill, a basic gauge on a refill kit works just fine for simple refills). They even rent out vacuum pumps if you feel up to fixing the AC yourself.

jwichmann5 said: If you don't want to put it in yourself pay someone to do it for you and give them the cans to use, or just sweat your fanny off for another day.

Two questions:

1. How many cans do we need for an SUV A/C? One. Two? Does it depend on the size of the car?
2. How much would be a fair amount for someone to do this for me? (My independent mechanic asked $175 for a recharge, which I thought was high, and that is supposed to be cheaper than the dealership) I am assuming this procedure is pretty standard for all make/model cars, right? You don't have to find someone who specialize on Benz for example, correct?

Thanks!

HBSRA10 said: jwichmann5 said: If you don't want to put it in yourself pay someone to do it for you and give them the cans to use, or just sweat your fanny off for another day.

Two questions:

1. How many cans do we need for an SUV A/C? One. Two? Does it depend on the size of the car?
2. How much would be a fair amount for someone to do this for me? (My independent mechanic asked $175 for a recharge, which I thought was high, and that is supposed to be cheaper than the dealership) I am assuming this procedure is pretty standard for all make/model cars, right? You don't have to find someone who specialize on Benz for example, correct?

Thanks!


No offense, but if you have to ask questions like this, you likely really shouldn't be trying to do this yourself. If you do things wrong, you can do things like blow your compressor, which will cost a couple thousand $$ to repair.
How much you need depends on a WIDE number of factors, and if your system is completely empty #1 you need to fix the leak and #2 you need to pull a vacuum on the system before filling.

jwichmann5 said: Here is how to put it in if you want to do it yourself.

http://www.freeonlineautorepair.com/recharge_ford_taurus_air_con...

You don't need a decent set of gauges, most people couldn't read a real gauge setup anyway, just use a setup like what is in the video above.

If you don't want to put it in yourself pay someone to do it for you and give them the cans to use, or just sweat your fanny off for another day.


Not to be an ass, but that video is terrible, and about 10x longer than it should be. Plus the guy even acts like he doesn't know what he is doing.

Why does he keep turning the car on and off?

Turn the car on

Set AC to max, fans to full and recirculate on

Plug the gauge and can to the low pressure service port

Puncture the can and let it fill until it's in the range you want, usually around 35-40psi. Compressor will click on and off. As long as you aren't in the red, you're good.

kami333 said: And if you are really worried, you can rent a decent set of gauges for free at Autozone (or about $40 at Harbor Freight when they are on sale, but I think it's an overkill, a basic gauge on a refill kit works just fine for simple refills). They even rent out vacuum pumps if you feel up to fixing the AC yourself.

Since when does autozone rent a/c gauges and vacuum pumps?

http://www.autozone.com/autozone/inourstores/lat/latLanding.jsp

I don't know the price point of refrigerants but my dad services air conditioning for a living.

One thing that I know... Air conditioning systems are ALWAYS closed systems. Just like a brake fluid system on a car. What this means is that unless you have some sort of a leak in the system, you would NEVER have to recharge/refill the system. If you need to refill the system, chances are, there are more things that you need to do than just refilling it. You have a leak. You need to find the leak, seal/replace the component to prevent future leakage, and THEN refill the system.

If you didn't realize this, you probably shouldn't be servicing your air conditioning system. Read up more on it or find someone. If your air conditioning system is working fine, you don't need more refrigerants. Just leave it as it is. It's not like fuel on a car which you use up.

KIDRoach said: I don't know the price point of refrigerants but my dad services air conditioning for a living.

One thing that I know... Air conditioning systems are ALWAYS closed systems. Just like a brake fluid system on a car. What this means is that unless you have some sort of a leak in the system, you would NEVER have to recharge/refill the system. If you need to refill the system, chances are, there are more things that you need to do than just refilling it. You have a leak. You need to find the leak, seal/replace the component to prevent future leakage, and THEN refill the system.

If you didn't realize this, you probably shouldn't be servicing your air conditioning system. Read up more on it or find someone. If your air conditioning system is working fine, you don't need more refrigerants. Just leave it as it is. It's not like fuel on a car which you use up.


There are moving parts and and a compressor with seals in the system. The seals tend to harden and develop slow leaks over time. You can replace coolant periodically for much less than having the system repaired and seals replaced in the compressor. I have seen people get several years out of a system with leaking seals in it simply by adding a little coolant about once a year.

Colie you are totally correct. I have re-charged one of my cars for years until last year I added some sealer now this year its still holding the charge so with a small leak just top the system off. And no need for gauges I have a set but its more work hooking them up than just adding charge. Stick a therm in the vents and add charge till it gets cold around 35-37deg like BrunoPuntzJones said. However if something in the system is bad sure it will not work but if its just a bit low in charge go for it.

Double post.......

KIDRoach said: I don't know the price point of refrigerants but my dad services air conditioning for a living.

One thing that I know... Air conditioning systems are ALWAYS closed systems. Just like a brake fluid system on a car. What this means is that unless you have some sort of a leak in the system, you would NEVER have to recharge/refill the system. If you need to refill the system, chances are, there are more things that you need to do than just refilling it. You have a leak. You need to find the leak, seal/replace the component to prevent future leakage, and THEN refill the system.

If you didn't realize this, you probably shouldn't be servicing your air conditioning system. Read up more on it or find someone. If your air conditioning system is working fine, you don't need more refrigerants. Just leave it as it is. It's not like fuel on a car which you use up.


Yes, I do very much "realize" and I am quiet capable of installing the refrigerant myself.

Let's examine, I have a $5k used car that gets me from point A-B just fine. I can pay someone hundreds of dollars to find and fix the slow leak, OR I can spend $10 on two cans of refrigerant once a year and stick it in there myself. What to do, what to do?

bpanepucci said: kami333 said: And if you are really worried, you can rent a decent set of gauges for free at Autozone (or about $40 at Harbor Freight when they are on sale, but I think it's an overkill, a basic gauge on a refill kit works just fine for simple refills). They even rent out vacuum pumps if you feel up to fixing the AC yourself.

Since when does autozone rent a/c gauges and vacuum pumps?

http://www.autozone.com/autozone/inourstores/lat/latLanding.jsp


I just called my local store, and no dice on the vacuum pump rental.

HBSRA10 said: jwichmann5 said: If you don't want to put it in yourself pay someone to do it for you and give them the cans to use, or just sweat your fanny off for another day.

Two questions:

1. How many cans do we need for an SUV A/C? One. Two? Does it depend on the size of the car?
2. How much would be a fair amount for someone to do this for me? (My independent mechanic asked $175 for a recharge, which I thought was high, and that is supposed to be cheaper than the dealership) I am assuming this procedure is pretty standard for all make/model cars, right? You don't have to find someone who specialize on Benz for example, correct?

Thanks!


My local Jiffy Lube only charges $100. A buddy in the used car business told me that they are generally the cheapest.

jwichmann5 said: Here is how to put it in if you want to do it yourself.

http://www.freeonlineautorepair.com/recharge_ford_taurus_air_con...

You don't need a decent set of gauges, most people couldn't read a real gauge setup anyway, just use a setup like what is in the video above.

If you don't want to put it in yourself pay someone to do it for you and give them the cans to use, or just sweat your fanny off for another day.


Not for nothing, but I hate those "how to" videos on youtube where the video is all shaky and blurry. Why even bother?

jimrome said: HBSRA10 said: jwichmann5 said: If you don't want to put it in yourself pay someone to do it for you and give them the cans to use, or just sweat your fanny off for another day.

Two questions:

1. How many cans do we need for an SUV A/C? One. Two? Does it depend on the size of the car?
2. How much would be a fair amount for someone to do this for me? (My independent mechanic asked $175 for a recharge, which I thought was high, and that is supposed to be cheaper than the dealership) I am assuming this procedure is pretty standard for all make/model cars, right? You don't have to find someone who specialize on Benz for example, correct?

Thanks!


My local Jiffy Lube only charges $100. A buddy in the used car business told me that they are generally the cheapest.


I find this very hard to believe.

I can't believe that you can get AC service done at any of the "goofey lubes" Reason being that any professional auto tech doing AC work needs to be certified to do so. This is FEDERAL LAW! (I am certified BTW) Do it yourselfers can buy the R134a to put in their own cars. I really doubt that a good auto tech would be working at a lube shop when he could make much more money elsewhere.


lexx said: the price is painted right on the cans. either it's really old stock or the new permanent price? they have a ton of them!That is the permanent Big Lots price, but without it being in this weeks ad you won't get a price match from another retailer.
WalMart's price in my area is around $6.50.

Scare tatics to pressure consumers into supporting an industry.
Best bet is to have someone who has done it themselves help you first time. If you are going to be working on auto yourself, buy a good repair manual for your car. Learning how to do it yourself is always better than spending unneeded money for someone to do it for you.

HBSRA10 said: jwichmann5 said: If you don't want to put it in yourself pay someone to do it for you and give them the cans to use, or just sweat your fanny off for another day.

Two questions:

1. How many cans do we need for an SUV A/C? One. Two? Does it depend on the size of the car?
2. How much would be a fair amount for someone to do this for me? (My independent mechanic asked $175 for a recharge, which I thought was high, and that is supposed to be cheaper than the dealership) I am assuming this procedure is pretty standard for all make/model cars, right? You don't have to find someone who specialize on Benz for example, correct?

Thanks!
There should be a sticker under the hood stating the capacity of the installed/modified system. However the amount needed to bring the system back up depends on how much is still in the system. If you know how much you add and what the capacity is then you know how much was in there. If you have to add more next year you can compare the rate of loss.

If a system still has some gas in it then adding some will likely help the cooling, temporarily. If there is no gas in the system then there is air in the system. If there is air in the system then it should be evacuated properly (even if no repair is made) before recharging. By evacuating the system you will also be able to judge the severity of the leak and decide whether you are wasting money by a temporary refill.

You will need a refill hose and a guage to use the cans from Big Lots. It is such a simple process that you can buy a couple cans and put them in right in the parking lot. If you need more go back into the store and buy some more.

NOTE:
You need to maintain your system in the winter months also. Not only do you not want the system to ever get empty (if you can avoid it), you also need a properly operating system for the defroster to do it's job. The compressor should run when in defrost (depending on outside temps for some systems) to remove the moisture from the air. With too much moisture in the air you will never get the windows to defog properly.

.


So over buy the amount of gas, and bring back what you don't use.

It shouldn't take more then 6, but probably to top off, if it's
not empty = 2-3 is plenty. BUT THEN = if you need more, go get
some more, the filling process can wait for you.


Cajun


.

Most vehicles will only require 2 cans if the system is EMPTY. If you manage to hook the can to the high pressure side, you will experience an explosion of the R134 can. It is hard to do but someone will rig something together to hit a high side port because they can't find the lowside port. If a system is overcharged, the compressor can and will likely fail. Hoses can also be burst due to over pressure but most newer systems have over-pressure switches designed to turn off the A/C if the pressure gets too high. Overcharging stresses every piece of the system and causes clutch cycling on the compressor (as does low pressures) which can lead to premature clutch failure. I'm all for do-it yourselfers but realize that this is a DIY that can cost you a bunch of money. It would be best to get a gauge set from harbor freight (or similar) and have them for future usage. Once you learn to use the gauges, you might be able to figure out the A/C is not working for a reason other than low "freon".
If nothing else, ask around as someone you know, likely knows how to charge an automotive A/C system and will do so for beer

Lemondrop said: Most vehicles will only require 2 cans if the system is EMPTY. If you manage to hook the can to the high pressure side, you will experience an explosion of the R134 can. It is hard to do but someone will rig something together to hit a high side port because they can't find the lowside port. If a system is overcharged, the compressor can and will likely fail. Hoses can also be burst due to over pressure but most newer systems have over-pressure switches designed to turn off the A/C if the pressure gets too high. Overcharging stresses every piece of the system and causes clutch cycling on the compressor (as does low pressures) which can lead to premature clutch failure. I'm all for do-it yourselfers but realize that this is a DIY that can cost you a bunch of money. It would be best to get a gauge set from harbor freight (or similar) and have them for future usage. Once you learn to use the gauges, you might be able to figure out the A/C is not working for a reason other than low "freon".
If nothing else, ask around as someone you know, likely knows how to charge an automotive A/C system and will do so for beer
HBSRA10 inquired about a SUV system which will likely take more than 2 cans if it has rear air. My 1994 Ford Van with rear air takes over 60 oz. (5 + cans) when empty.

I can't imagine someone dufus enough to find a way to get that charging hose on the high side, but I guess there probably is.
It would likely take several trips to the auto parts and surely enough questions that the counter person would figure out what was going on. Of course the counter person could be just as big a dufus.

I was able to rent a vacuum pump and guages last year from Autozone. They put a hold on your CC but when you return the items the charge is removed. My store didn't even have a rental fee of any sort. The store I went to was in Norfolk, VA.

jimrome said: bpanepucci said: kami333 said: And if you are really worried, you can rent a decent set of gauges for free at Autozone (or about $40 at Harbor Freight when they are on sale, but I think it's an overkill, a basic gauge on a refill kit works just fine for simple refills). They even rent out vacuum pumps if you feel up to fixing the AC yourself.

Since when does autozone rent a/c gauges and vacuum pumps?

http://www.autozone.com/autozone/inourstores/lat/latLanding.jsp


I just called my local store, and no dice on the vacuum pump rental.


Seems like it is store dependent. link I rented a set from the Autozone in downtown Salt Lake last summer to swap from R12 (hose had a hole so everything was already vented). Next time you are there, check out the loan-a-tool chart they have, I believe it was listed there.

KIDRoach said: I don't know the price point of refrigerants but my dad services air conditioning for a living.

One thing that I know... Air conditioning systems are ALWAYS closed systems. Just like a brake fluid system on a car. What this means is that unless you have some sort of a leak in the system, you would NEVER have to recharge/refill the system. If you need to refill the system, chances are, there are more things that you need to do than just refilling it. You have a leak. You need to find the leak, seal/replace the component to prevent future leakage, and THEN refill the system.

If you didn't realize this, you probably shouldn't be servicing your air conditioning system. Read up more on it or find someone. If your air conditioning system is working fine, you don't need more refrigerants. Just leave it as it is. It's not like fuel on a car which you use up.


Even though it is a "closed" system, freon and refrigerant do wear out over time and need to be replaced along with adding oil. It works the same for brake fluid on a car. 2 cents from a 20 year ASE mechanic.

pjrxj said: Even though it is a "closed" system, freon and refrigerant do wear out over time and need to be replaced along with adding oil. It works the same for brake fluid on a car. 2 cents from a 20 year ASE mechanic.Engine oil and antifreeze I can understand - brake fluid and freon, not so much. Could you please explain further?

jwichmann5 said: Here is how to put it in if you want to do it yourself.

http://www.freeonlineautorepair.com/recharge_ford_taurus_air_conditioner.html

You don't need a decent set of gauges, most people couldn't read a real gauge setup anyway, just use a setup like what is in the video above.

If you don't want to put it in yourself pay someone to do it for you and give them the cans to use, or just sweat your fanny off for another day.


I don't think the person in the video takes enough precautions against overcharging the system (can cause an explosion when the safety relief pops open) or preventing liquid refrigerant from flowing into the system (can damage the compressor -- look up "slugging". To prevent this, the can must be kept upright so only gaseous refrigerant enters).

I use a pair of cheap dial thermometers, like fast-acting food thermometers. They don't have to be highly accurate, but their readings should match exactly when they're stirred in ice water and their tips are touching. Tape the tip of one thermometer to the inlet pipe of the car A/C's evaporator coil, near the engine compartment firewall, the other's to the outlet pipe. I believe only 4 pipes pass through the firewall, the other two being for the heater core. Apply a dab of grease to the tips to improve heat conduction with the pipes. There's no need for expensive thermal paste made for computer chip heatsinks; ordinary grease works fine. Run the car A/C on Max, at high fan speed with the windows rolled up, the doors closed, and the engine at a fast idle, like 1,500-2,000 RPM. If the A/C is working perfectly, the two thermometers will read identically at at around 32-35F after 5-10 minutes, but if there's a big difference, like 10-30F, the system could be low on charge. Provided low charge is the only problem, then refrigerant can be added slowly to the system until the two thermometers read almost identically. Hold the R-134a can upright, open its valve slightly to purge out air for a few seconds, and press it against the low pressure charging valve (low and high pressure valves are different sizes to make mix-up impossible). Watch the pressure gauge on the can and the thermometers. Close the valve if the pressure goes too high or once the thermometers read almost identically, whichever comes first. Don't open the valve all the way. If the thermometer on the inlet (the one that read colder before charging began) reads hotter than the other one, then the system has probably been overcharged. It's best to charge when the weather is around 70-80F, and in hotter temperatures it's safer to undercharge.

How long does this process really takes, if the can costs $5 but the service charge is $175 (probably over $260 at the dealership)? I understand mechanics need to make money too but what a margin...

TakeTheActive said: pjrxj said: Even though it is a "closed" system, freon and refrigerant do wear out over time and need to be replaced along with adding oil. It works the same for brake fluid on a car. 2 cents from a 20 year ASE mechanic.Engine oil and antifreeze I can understand - brake fluid and freon, not so much. Could you please explain further?

Brake fluid gets worn out and contaminated (dirty) over time. Look at your brake fluid. Is it as clear as water? Is your car more than a couple of years old? The same is true for refrigerant. It does get used and must be replaced periodically. Like a previous poster said it does leak as well. Granted, the newer the car the less it leaks.

HBSRA10 said: How long does this process really takes, if the can costs $5 but the service charge is $175 (probably over $260 at the dealership)? I understand mechanics need to make money too but what a margin...

If you've done it once before and know where the port is and how to attach it, literally less than 3 minutes.

Unplug service port - 5 seconds
Attach valve - 10 seconds
Turn knob on gauge or filler neck - 5 seconds
Wait for system to fill - a minute?
Check gauge and compressor cycling for about a minute, then unhook the port and recap.

Fast idle? i dunno about that. Every time I have refilled my cars, its been at a standard idle of 750-1000rpm. Any faster and the low pressure side gauge needle goes way down... the more gas and the lower the pressure goes.


spring lock joint, green o-rings
Disclaimer
KIDRoach said: I don't know the price point of refrigerants but my dad services air conditioning for a living.

One thing that I know... Air conditioning systems are ALWAYS closed systems. Just like a brake fluid system on a car. What this means is that unless you have some sort of a leak in the system, you would NEVER have to recharge/refill the system. If you need to refill the system, chances are, there are more things that you need to do than just refilling it. You have a leak. You need to find the leak, seal/replace the component to prevent future leakage, and THEN refill the system.

If you didn't realize this, you probably shouldn't be servicing your air conditioning system. Read up more on it or find someone. If your air conditioning system is working fine, you don't need more refrigerants. Just leave it as it is. It's not like fuel on a car which you use up.
Refrigerators and stationary A/Cs are sealed with welds and brazes, but car A/C systems use o-rings and have compressors with shafts exposed to the outside world. Then there are bad joint designs, like the press-together spring locks that were used by Ford and Chrysler that leaked a lot until they were changed from neoprene or nitrile o-rings to some special rubber that's dyed green. I think Ford also switched from a 2-ring to 3-ring design.

Skipping 22 Messages...
SpinControl said: A little guidance please:
My 95 Jeep GC was blowing warm air.
Hooked up the pressure gauge, and it read <20 psi (empty?).
I did not vacuum the system, and used the recharge can as instructed.

Issues:
1. When recharging to the pressure on the instructions (AC on MAX), should the compressor be cycling?
- Mine gauge goes from 55 psi (compressor off/not spinning) to 28 psi (compressor on/spinning).
- Is the target psi the pressure when the compressor is on FULL TIME, or when the compressor is off?

I've read that I am probably low still on the R134a since the compressor is cycling. Is this true? The static pressure (when the car is turned off) is 100 psi at the low pressure port. I thought the cycling could be due to a bad LP switch, so I bought a new one, and it is still cycling.

2. I cannot seem to empty the 12 oz can (I can feel liquid as I roll the can from side to side). Is this because there is too much pressure in the system due to the air (that was not evacuated)?

Much help us appreciated.

It's been *YEARS* since I messed with this, but since it's also been 48 hours with no replies to your questions, I thought I'd throw in my '2 Cents'. (It'll be interesting to see how my 'memory' compares to what a Guru says!)
  • You're posting LOTs of PSI numbers - <20, 28, 55, 100.
    - You didn't pull a vacuum, so what's most important to me is "Was there Freon in the system BEFORE you started?" With everything OFF, you depress the Schrader valve and see if you get gas escaping and ice forming.
    • YES. You still have a shot - add Freon.
    • NO. You waited too long - pull a vacuum (and repair any MAJOR leaks!) BEFORE adding freon.

  • The next thing I remember is looking for a 'Frost Line'.
    - a system low on Freon will 'ice up' on the low side from low pressure / more gas than liquid / below normal temp (WAGs from memory). As you add Freon, the 'Ice Line' shortens and turns into a 'Sweat Line' with water in the atmosphere condensing, but no longer freezing, on the cold surface. I stick a 'Probe Thermometer' in a center vent with the A/C on MAX (no outside air) and Fan on High and look for the temp to drop. If it starts at 100F and doesn't drop after adding a WHOLE CAN, I'd start thinking 'bigger picture'.

  • If you can't empty the can, are you SURE anything is going in?
    • Is the can getting cold?
    • Is the can getting lighter?
    • Did you bleed the air out of the line between the can and the Schrader valve and get gas escaping and ice forming?
    • Did you trying 'dumping a LITTLE' liquid in? (You don't want to seize the compressor!)

  • How long is the compressor running each cycle?
    - I worked on my own cars from the late 60's to around the early 90's so I don't remember 'Low Pressure Switches'. (Did Freon escape when you replaced this switch?) But, if the compressor is quickly cycling OFF right after turning ON, you probably need more Freon. The fact that you can't get one can in suggests either 'Operator Error' or other problems.

  • I would GOOGLE for pressure gauge readings (High side and Low side) WITH the compressor running and the correct amount of Freon in the system.
    - Back in "My Day", I had two books that I'd always drag outside to review:
    1. HOW the system was supposed to work
    2. Which was the HIGH side and which was the LOW side
    3. What pressures to read on the LOW side for corresponding temperatures at the vent.
      IIRC...


Good Luck!



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