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There is a $20 coupon to help defray the cost of Singulair (or the co-pay) on the Singular web site. The coupon has a couple of restrictions, but for the most part if you have a Singulair prescription using the coupon is found money.

Link
There is a button to print the coupon about halfway down the page.

Hope this helps someone!


Coupon Terms and Conditions:
•The coupon is valid for up to $20 off 1 qualifying prescription for SINGULAIR.
•Limit 1 coupon per patient for the duration of the program.
•Coupon valid for 1-time use only. Patient must have a copayment or make full cash payment for the prescription. Savings are limited to amount of copay or cash payment up to a maximum of $20.
•No other purchase is required.
•The coupon is not transferable. No substitutions are permitted. Cannot be combined with any other free trial, discount, prescription savings card, or other offer.
•The coupon is not insurance.
•The coupon is valid for patients with private insurance or cash-paying patients. Not valid for patients covered under Medicaid, Medicare, a Medicare Part D or Medicare Advantage plan (regardless of whether a specific prescription is covered), TRICARE, CHAMPUS, Puerto Rico Government Health Insurance Plan ("Healthcare Reform"), or any other state or federal medical or pharmaceutical benefit program or pharmaceutical assistance program.
•The coupon is void for Massachusetts residents if a third-party payer reimburses or pays any amount of the prescription price or otherwise provides coverage for SINGULAIR.
•You must be 18 years or older to redeem the coupon for yourself or your minor child. Patient, guardian, pharmacist, and prescriber agree not to seek reimbursement for all or any part of the benefit received by the recipient through the offer. Patient or guardian is responsible for reporting receipt of coupon benefit to any insurer, health plan, or other third party who pays for or reimburses any part of the prescription filled using the coupon, as may be required.
•The coupon can be used only by eligible US or Commonwealth of Puerto Rico residents at any participating eligible retail or mail-order pharmacy in the United States or the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. Product must originate in the United States or the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico.
•The coupon is the property of Merck and must be turned in on request.
•It is illegal to sell, purchase, trade, or counterfeit, or offer to sell, purchase, trade, or counterfeit the coupon. Void where prohibited by law, taxed, or restricted.
•Merck reserves the right to rescind, revoke, or amend the offer at any time without notice.
•Please read the Patient Information on singulair.com and discuss it with your doctor. Also on singulair.com is the physician Prescribing Information.
•Expiration Date: 08/31/2012.

Member Summary

Our pediatrician just prescribed this to my son. Imagine my surprise to discover that (thanks to my insurance plan's crummy prescription coverage), the cost would be roughly $6 per pill or $175 per month. A little Googling shows that (in child dosages, at least) the same pill (name brand, not generic) in Canada is roughly 30% this price ($50 per month) and that a generic version is also available in Canada.

The online Canadian pharmacies offer the generics for less than $1 apiece. My first 2 search results showed one place that has them for roughly 60 cents shipped and another that has them for roughly 90 cents. For those doing the math, the 60 cent pills are 1/10th the price of the name brand ones in the US. The generics (in kid-size chewables, at least) sold at the brick and mortar pharmacies in Canada (the ones I saw, at least) are made by "Teva". If you're an American who lives near the Canadian border, don't bother trying to go across with a prescription. Pharmacies will only accept a Canadian prescription. If you want to get a Canadian prescription, you need to go to a drop-in clinic and pay $100+ for a consultation, which tends to eat into your cost savings. Don't ask how I know all this. Just stick with the Canadian pharmacies by mail -- cheaper in the long run. I can post links, but Googling "Canada Pharmacy generic singulair" should get you quick results. The law seems to be a bit gray about importing from Canada, but it appears that a 3-month supply is allowed by Customs, the FDA, or whoever is lobbied by the US pharmaceutical firms to restrict imports.

b100 said:   Our pediatrician just prescribed this to my son. Imagine my surprise to discover that (thanks to my insurance plan's crummy prescription coverage), the cost would be roughly $6 per pill or $175 per month. A little Googling shows that (in child dosages, at least) the same pill (name brand, not generic) in Canada is roughly 30% this price ($50 per month) and that a generic version is also available in Canada.

The online Canadian pharmacies offer the generics for less than $1 apiece. My first 2 search results showed one place that has them for roughly 60 cents shipped and another that has them for roughly 90 cents. For those doing the math, the 60 cent pills are 1/10th the price of the name brand ones in the US. The generics (in kid-size chewables, at least) sold at the brick and mortar pharmacies in Canada (the ones I saw, at least) are made by "Teva". If you're an American who lives near the Canadian border, don't bother trying to go across with a prescription. Pharmacies will only accept a Canadian prescription. If you want to get a Canadian prescription, you need to go to a drop-in clinic and pay $100+ for a consultation, which tends to eat into your cost savings. Don't ask how I know all this. Just stick with the Canadian pharmacies by mail -- cheaper in the long run. I can post links, but Googling "Canada Pharmacy generic singulair" should get you quick results. The law seems to be a bit gray about importing from Canada, but it appears that a 3-month supply is allowed by Customs, the FDA, or whoever is lobbied by the US pharmaceutical firms to restrict imports.


US Pharmaceuticals restrict imports because in Canada caps exist on how much money Canadians can sue Pharmacy companies for. Essentially drugs are more expensive because there is additional risk in the US to conduct business. The costs associated with getting a drug to approved status are astronomical. People tend to think that because it now costs .0001 cents to produce a drug....their $10 pill is overpriced. What they don't consider is the millions of dollars necessary to test test and retest the these medications. Thats just the drugs that make it......where one succeeds....hundreds fail.

It's amazing to me that people question the cost of healthcare. They don't consider who exactly is helping them feel better. The doctor who spent 8+ years minimum studying his life away. The pharmacist who spent 5+ years.....the hundreds of thousands of dollars they people racked up in student loans. The countless hours spent studying or on rotation.

Oh, these types of coupons for brand name medications exist from many companies.

healthcare is about to take an across the board cut of 30%. You'll see.

My son takes the 5mg chewtabs however our insurance is good enough that we pay a $15 copay for a 90 day supply. We have to ask for a 90 day supply otherwise each refill is an additional $15. My son accidently dropped a whole bottle into a sinkful of water once and I had to replace it for $150 @ Walgreens so I know how expensive Singular is... I will say though, that at least in the case of my son, the drug works and works well. I'm a little surprised that you are seeing a cost of $6 per pill because for the 5mg chewtab 90 day supply was $150 at Walgreens IIRC without using any insurance. Are you sure that this isn't a deductible/copay premium from your insurance plan? Maybe my memory is just going...

Other options you have are asking your pediatrician for samples. We have gotten up to 60 pills this way. Merk also has a program that can help you pay for your medications at http://www.singulair.com/singulair/shared/documents/english/merc... . This may help you somewhat.

Good luck!

PuddleJumper said:   healthcare is about to take an across the board cut of 30%. You'll see.
How so?

PuddleJumper said:   healthcare is about to take an across the board cut of 30%. You'll see.

LOL 30% of physicians will quit or stop taking that "cut" program........then prices will go back to 35% higher. You'll see.

Why people think a cut to compensation is the answer is beyond me. We already have a shortage of physicians.....you think someone will take on $300K+ in student debt and forgo 10 years of their peak earning years for less money/benefits.

As soon as people stop getting sick....and stop getting old we'll see a reduction in cost.

What we SHOULD do is help those in need. People seem to think that because we don't have universal healthcare.....we don't provide healthcare to everyone. When a homeless person goes to the ER for a sniffle......who exactly do you think picks up that tab? Do you think the hospital denies service?

$50 in prevention may have saved $1500 in that ER visit.

ViveLeRoi said:   I'm a little surprised that you are seeing a cost of $6 per pill because for the 5mg chewtab 90 day supply was $150 at Walgreens IIRC without using any insurance. Are you sure that this isn't a deductible/copay premium from your insurance plan? Maybe my memory is just going...


You made me wonder if I had somehow misunderstood the pharmacists I called, but I just checked drugstore.com, which wants $166 for 30 days' worth of the 4mg chewables:

drugstore.com Singulair

That's within 10% of the price I got at the other pharmacies I called, I think. I will check Walgreens, but it seems unlikely they're 1/3 of that price...

it is wonder full to see responsible people browsing forums for discounts, while testing medicine."The countless hours spent studying or on rotation." or inventing the whole system!

b100 said:   ViveLeRoi said:   I'm a little surprised that you are seeing a cost of $6 per pill because for the 5mg chewtab 90 day supply was $150 at Walgreens IIRC without using any insurance. Are you sure that this isn't a deductible/copay premium from your insurance plan? Maybe my memory is just going...


You made me wonder if I had somehow misunderstood the pharmacists I called, but I just checked drugstore.com, which wants $166 for 30 days' worth of the 4mg chewables:

drugstore.com Singulair

That's within 10% of the price I got at the other pharmacies I called, I think. I will check Walgreens, but it seems unlikely they're 1/3 of that price...


As I said... it could be my memory. There have been several medications that we have purchased over the years where the pharmacy that filled it has told us how much we have saved and Singulair along with another prescription stood out because they were so expensive. I just don't recall the price being quite as high as you are reporting!

opathal said:   

US Pharmaceuticals restrict imports because in Canada caps exist on how much money Canadians can sue Pharmacy companies for. Essentially drugs are more expensive because there is additional risk in the US to conduct business. The costs associated with getting a drug to approved status are astronomical. People tend to think that because it now costs .0001 cents to produce a drug....their $10 pill is overpriced. What they don't consider is the millions of dollars necessary to test test and retest the these medications. Thats just the drugs that make it......where one succeeds....hundreds fail.

It's amazing to me that people question the cost of healthcare. They don't consider who exactly is helping them feel better. The doctor who spent 8+ years minimum studying his life away. The pharmacist who spent 5+ years.....the hundreds of thousands of dollars they people racked up in student loans. The countless hours spent studying or on rotation.


Because my post was quoted in its entirety, I'm guessing I'm the target of this message, so I feel obligated to reply.

As far as I can tell, I posted on fatwallet.com, not letsdiscussthemeritsoftheamericanhealthcaresystem.com, but here goes:

Did I assert that a $10 pill is overpriced? Did I question the cost of healthcare?

Pricing is tricky for any product or service, and when it's for something as complex as pharmaceuticals or healthcare, it can be mind-boggling. The price charged for the item often has little to do with the cost of the item...but that doesn't mean that a customer doesn't have the right to find the best price. Cell phone companies, internet service providers, cable TV operators, airlines, hotels, and car rental agencies all employ differential pricing -- next time you fly, why not ask the guy in the next seat how much he paid for his ticket? We, as fatwalleters, have a drive to find the best prices on whatever we buy. If Merck sells Singulair in the US for $6 a pill and in Canada for $1.75 a pill, why on earth would I pay $6? Pharmaceutical firms charge what they think each market will bear (in the big picture, working to pay off their substantial R&D costs, legal expenses, advertising, etc, and hopefully returning a profit to their shareholders) and then attempt to set up barriers to keep folks from the more expensive markets away from the pharmacies in the cheaper markets. Their attempts are generally very successful...but if we have the opportunity to get a lower price, then why not? I do so with my cell phone, with my plane tickets, and car rentals too. And in this case, I'm saving $1500 a year.

I'm also not sure exactly how the doctors and pharmacists fit into this discussion. I am pretty sure that the MDs, NPs, and pharmacists' salaries are not tied to the price of prescriptions. The fact that the US pharmacies are all charging essentially the same price for the drug tells me that they're not making much money on it. The lion's share is going back to Merck, who is working to recoup their R&D costs and hopefully come up with more life-improving drugs.

BTW, if I were "questioning the cost of health care", I'd probably start by mentioning that the CEO of McKesson made $46 million last year (down from $145 million in 2010). The CEO of Aetna made $31 million...and neither one went to med school.

b100 said:   opathal said:   

US Pharmaceuticals restrict imports because in Canada caps exist on how much money Canadians can sue Pharmacy companies for. Essentially drugs are more expensive because there is additional risk in the US to conduct business. The costs associated with getting a drug to approved status are astronomical. People tend to think that because it now costs .0001 cents to produce a drug....their $10 pill is overpriced. What they don't consider is the millions of dollars necessary to test test and retest the these medications. Thats just the drugs that make it......where one succeeds....hundreds fail.

It's amazing to me that people question the cost of healthcare. They don't consider who exactly is helping them feel better. The doctor who spent 8+ years minimum studying his life away. The pharmacist who spent 5+ years.....the hundreds of thousands of dollars they people racked up in student loans. The countless hours spent studying or on rotation.


Because my post was quoted in its entirety, I'm guessing I'm the target of this message, so I feel obligated to reply.

As far as I can tell, I posted on fatwallet.com, not letsdiscussthemeritsoftheamericanhealthcaresystem.com, but here goes:

Did I assert that a $10 pill is overpriced? Did I question the cost of healthcare?

Pricing is tricky for any product or service, and when it's for something as complex as pharmaceuticals or healthcare, it can be mind-boggling. The price charged for the item often has little to do with the cost of the item...but that doesn't mean that a customer doesn't have the right to find the best price. Cell phone companies, internet service providers, cable TV operators, airlines, hotels, and car rental agencies all employ differential pricing -- next time you fly, why not ask the guy in the next seat how much he paid for his ticket? We, as fatwalleters, have a drive to find the best prices on whatever we buy. If Merck sells Singulair in the US for $6 a pill and in Canada for $1.75 a pill, why on earth would I pay $6? Pharmaceutical firms charge what they think each market will bear (in the big picture, working to pay off their substantial R&D costs, legal expenses, advertising, etc, and hopefully returning a profit to their shareholders) and then attempt to set up barriers to keep folks from the more expensive markets away from the pharmacies in the cheaper markets. Their attempts are generally very successful...but if we have the opportunity to get a lower price, then why not? I do so with my cell phone, with my plane tickets, and car rentals too. And in this case, I'm saving $1500 a year.

I'm also not sure exactly how the doctors and pharmacists fit into this discussion. I am pretty sure that the MDs, NPs, and pharmacists' salaries are not tied to the price of prescriptions. The fact that the US pharmacies are all charging essentially the same price for the drug tells me that they're not making much money on it. The lion's share is going back to Merck, who is working to recoup their R&D costs and hopefully come up with more life-improving drugs.

BTW, if I were "questioning the cost of health care", I'd probably start by mentioning that the CEO of McKesson made $46 million last year (down from $145 million in 2010). The CEO of Aetna made $31 million...and neither one went to med school.


Someone mentioned the price of care to drop 30% with I believe is a fight to lower costs.....by paying doctors less. It wasn't all in direct response to you. I completely and 1000% agree the admin costs of health are ridiculous and come at the cost of patient care and health. There are so so so many added layers of cost. I am not an Obama fan, but saying 80% of premiums MUST go to patient care is amazing.

It breaks my heart to see patients be denied possibly life saving medications due to their restrictive costs. Will someone be allowed to die? No.....will get a massive life crushing bill? Yes. There are places we can save.....taking away incentives for companies to research medications isn't one of those ways and either is cutting compensation paid to doctors, pharmacies etc.

b100, I was a little confused how this post which was supposed to be about saving FW members $20 had devolved into a political discussion!

I sincerely hope your child outgrows his/her need for allergy medication. For my son, the sneezing and coughing and skin rashes that Singulair controls makes it worth it for the quality of his life. He rarely needs albuterol or Flovent because of the drug, so its worth isn't calculated just on a per-pill basis because it makes such huge difference for him.

Hopefully, both the Singulair coupon and the Merk discount program will apply to you and others because regardless of where you get the drug, it can be a substantial cost.

Bump, since the coupon is still good for a few more months.



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