• Page :
  • 1
  • Text Only
Voting History
rated:
Was walking in to Home Depot this evening and found the following LED bulbs on sale for $7.97 each. Normally I have not seen them less than $15 a pop.

# Brightness: 430 Lumens
# Estimeated Yearly Energy Cost: $0.96 (Based on 3 hrs/day, 0.11/kWh. Costs depend on rates and use.)
# Life: 46 years (Based on 3 hrs/day)
# Light Appearance: 3000K Bright White (WW)
# Energy Used: 8 Watts (equivalent to a 40 watt standard incandescent light bulb)

For detailed description and specs see the link below.

8.6-Watt (40W equivalent) LED bulb at Home Depot

Home Depot
See Home Depot promo codes that earn 2.0% FatWallet Cash Back.
Member Summary

EcoSmart A19 8.6-Watt (40W) LED Light Bulb
Thanks Valtron9000
Disclaimer
Most Recent Posts
Who cares about the physics behind it. Buy it, don't like it...return it

usadaytrader (Apr. 25, 2012 @ 6:32p) |

How did they confirm that it is $7.97 elsewhere (other HD stores)? Did you bring along a printout or something?

Billygoats (Apr. 27, 2012 @ 4:40p) |

They did not ask for any proof. Nor did I have anything to prove it, except what I read here from OP (which I assumed it... (more)

tonglu1 (Apr. 28, 2012 @ 6:11p) |

Staff Summary
Thanks for visiting FatWallet.com. Join for free to remove this ad.

Note: LED bulbs at certain prices may be available at certain localities due to subsidized price from utility company. So it's not a nation wide deal that everybody can get... But technically, if we knew which store had this price, we can order online and have it shipped...

seems inefficient for an LED bulb.

arent CFL 8-9w for "40w"


its 9.97 at my local HD

LEDs use about the same wattage as the equivalent CFL, but they last longer (up to 10 times longer, meaning fewer bulbs consumed over a lifetime); they burn cooler (especially good if you're in an area that requires cooling rather than heat most of the year) and they don't contain mercury and other toxic metals so disposal is a little greener. Considering the big picture, they are more energy efficient.

hqh51 said:   Note: LED bulbs at certain prices may be available at certain localities due to subsidized price from utility company. So it's not a nation wide deal that everybody can get... But technically, if we knew which store had this price, we can order online and have it shipped...


If you click on the link in the original posting, it shows the store where it is available (See "My Store Location: MT Laurel #914")

"they burn cooler"
how is 10 watts of energy expended by an led cooler than 10 watts from a cfl or 10 watts out of anything else, such as a running hamster?

Gojumpina said:   "they burn cooler"
how is 10 watts of energy expended by an led cooler than 10 watts from a cfl or 10 watts out of anything else, such as a running hamster?


You can't really tell how cool it burns just by the wattage.

You have to look at the amount of energy (light/head) that is emitted. For example CFLs and LEDs run about as hot as incandescent bulbs of the same brightness simply because the incandescents shoot out most of their energy as infrared heat, while CFLs and LEDs emit almost none.

I doubt this runs cooler than a CFL.

I have the 60W version of this bulb and I love it. Instant on, good quality light, great dimming. It can pulse somewhat at some dimmer settings though. I also have a Philips L Prize bulb and although the L Prize has better quality light (it's almost unbelievable how close the L Prize bulb appears to an incandescent) and seems completely resistant to pulsing while dimmed, the EcoSmart bulb turns on and off quicker and dims lower.

For this price, this is a good bulb. Assuming it is similar to the 60W, which honestly, it kind of appears it isn't.

Note that due to heat this likely is not approved for use in fully enclosed fixtures (i.e. ceiling fan domes). It may work anyway, but that's your call. It's also larger than a 40W bulb too, so it may not even fit in there. It is smaller than a CFL though.

Gojumpina said:   "they burn cooler"
how is 10 watts of energy expended by an led cooler than 10 watts from a cfl or 10 watts out of anything else, such as a running hamster?

Energy consumed and energy dissipated are 2 different things.

king0fSpades said:   Gojumpina said:   "they burn cooler"
how is 10 watts of energy expended by an led cooler than 10 watts from a cfl or 10 watts out of anything else, such as a running hamster?

Energy consumed and energy dissipated are 2 different things.


That's not true at all. The laws of thermodynamics say they are exactly the same amount. The question at play is in what forms is the energy dissipated? In this case, what proportions of visible light, infrared light and direct heating of the bulb itself.

But make no mistake the energy dissipated is equal to the amount of electricity it draws from the wiring.

Energy is energy, watts are watts. It makes no difference what the source is or how well that source converts electricity to something else, such as light or the spinning of a hamster wheel.

Lets say you have a black box and something unknown inside which is consuming 10 watts. A 10 watt cooler is required to keep the interior of the box at constant temperature. The technology inside the box is not relevant (led, cfl or hamster) for thermal loading, which was the context of lindelynn's statement.

Gojumpina said:   Energy is energy, watts are watts. It makes no difference what the source is or how well that source converts electricity to something else, such as light or the spinning of a hamster wheel.

Lets say you have a black box and something unknown inside which is consuming 10 watts. A 10 watt cooler is required to keep the interior of the box at constant temperature. The technology inside the box is not relevant (led, cfl or hamster) for thermal loading, which was the context of lindelynn's statement.


Light bulbs are not black boxes though, they are clear glass boxes. They throw off energy. Incandescents in particular emit more energy as infrared heat than as visible light. Because of this, a 10W LED/CFL can easily run as hot (the bulb itself) as a 40W incandescent even though it is taking in 1/4 as much energy. The incandescent is throwing 30W of heat off (which then heats up your room) while an LED bumb emits almost none.

Now we are comparing energy from a 10 watt device to that of a 40 watt device? Of course those will be different. A 40 watt hamster would need 40 watts of cooling.

Gojumpina said:   Now we are comparing energy from a 10 watt device to that of a 40 watt device? Of course those will be different. A 40 watt hamster would need 40 watts of cooling.

Not if it cools itself by emitting some energy instead of just self-heating.

Think of it this way, an electric radiative heater requires no cooling at all even though it takes in 1500W. While a computer that takes in only 200W has multiple fans.

You're messing yourself up with the black box idea and thinking all energy is turned into self-heating. This just isn't true for light bulbs and other radiative devices.

Any room with 10 watts of energy going in will require 10 watts of cooling to keep it at stable temperature. It makes no difference whether those 10 watts are converted into light, heat, or hamster motion, or any combination of those.

Gojumpina said:   Any room with 10 watts of energy going in will require 10 watts of cooling to keep it at stable temperature. It makes no difference whether those 10 watts are converted into light, heat, or hamster motion, or any combination of those.

Mostly true. But we're not talking about rooms, we're talking about light bulbs.

An ideal light bulb would emit 100% light and no heat. The room would require the same amount of cooling, but the light bulb itself would be completely different, running without warming to the touch and emitting more visible light than a less efficient bulb of the same wattage.

Note that in this room, if the 10W were used completely to lift a weight to a state of higher potential energy (i.e lift it higher), it would produce no heat, the room would require no cooling at all while other rooms would warm up.

Your black box idea is only true if the state of potential energy in the box doesn't change. Unless you know what is in the box, you couldn't predict whether this will happen or not before you input the energy.

Gojumpina said:   "they burn cooler"
how is 10 watts of energy expended by an led cooler than 10 watts from a cfl or 10 watts out of anything else, such as a running hamster?


10 watts of energy enter. So 10 watts of energy must be released. In a "cool" light bulb, very little of the energy is thrown off as heat.

The more energy is converted to light, and the less energy wasted as heat, the better.

Ugh, doesn't anyone remember high-school physics?

The work being done by light bulbs is to create light. Two bulbs doing the same amount of work (producing 40W incandescent-equivalent light) while consuming the same amount of power have the same efficiency - which means they will produce the same amount of heat. LED bulbs are "cooler" only to the extent that they produce more lumens per watt, and that is true for any bulb of any technology - "coolness" is essentially a function of lumens per watt.

This bulb produces 430 lumens. It is easy to find CFLs producing this amount of light from the 7 through 9 watt range. This bulb is no more efficient than a CFL, and does not run any "cooler" than any CFLs you find with the same lumens/watt ratio.

The benefits of this LED vs readily available CFLs are instant-on, lack of mercury and being lower insect-attraction. The cons are price and the limited coverage from the extended base. If you've been looking for LEDs for outdoor lighting, this is a nice enough deal.

$9.97 in my area (92562/92584).

8.6 watts bulb - 40 watts equivalent??

didn't Newegg had a sale last week or so for a 7 watt bulb - 40 watts equivalent for $6.60 ?

9.97 here in 75062

lindelynn said:   LEDs use about the same wattage as the equivalent CFL, but they last longer (up to 10 times longer, meaning fewer bulbs consumed over a lifetime); they burn coolerHow can they burn cooler if they use about the same wattage???

I'll bet the electronics that regulate the power burn out way before the light source does, just like with CFLs.


9.97 in St Clair, PA

9.97 in Allentown, PA

jariten said:   Ugh, doesn't anyone remember high-school physics?

The work being done by light bulbs is to create light. Two bulbs doing the same amount of work (producing 40W incandescent-equivalent light) while consuming the same amount of power have the same efficiency - which means they will produce the same amount of heat. LED bulbs are "cooler" only to the extent that they produce more lumens per watt, and that is true for any bulb of any technology - "coolness" is essentially a function of lumens per watt.


Except the lumens number measure only measures visible light and some bulb (incandescent) emit a lot of IR energy. That energy isn't emitted as light, isn't kept in the bulb as heat, but instead is radiated to heat up the room without illuminating it.

Basically inputenergy = IR + light + heat

You know the inputenergy and the light, but you don't know the amount of IR production for any given bulb unless you see a spectrum chart. So you can't calculate the self heating.

Luckily, I can dig up the spectrum chart for this bulb.

http://www.lsgc.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/DFN-A19-W27-V1-LM...

This bulb emits 98.9% of its radiated energy as visible light, and 1.1% as IR. It emits nearly zero as UV.

larrymoencurly said:   lindelynn said:   LEDs use about the same wattage as the equivalent CFL, but they last longer (up to 10 times longer, meaning fewer bulbs consumed over a lifetime); they burn coolerHow can they burn cooler if they use about the same wattage???.


I think we're confusing ourselves by using the word "cooler" to describe two very different things.

In one context, we're using "cooler" to describe how much - or how little - cooling (in watts or BTU's) is required to counteract the heat emitted by the device. In that case, as has been said, if the device uses 8 watts, then the device emits 8 watts of heat and it requires 8 watts of cooling to counteract those 8 watts of heat. For this purpose, it matters not if all 8 watts are perfectly converted to light (which would then just heat up the stuff it shines on) or if it is perfectly INefficient and all 8 watts are converted directly to heat and it yields no light. In this context, all devices that use 8 watts would be exactly equally cool as any other 8 watt devices, regardless of the temperature at which they operated or how much light they generated. For example, a 20 watt halogen light bulb would operate much "cooler" (in this context, i.e. less heat emitted) than a 500 watt refrigerator.

In the other context, we're using "cooler" to describe the operating temperature of the device itself. In this context, all devices that operated at 130 degrees would be exactly as "cool" as all other devices that operated at 130 degrees, regardless of how many watts they used or how much light they generated. In this context, the refrigerator would be operating "cooler" - i.e. at a lower temperature - than the halogen bulb.

The thing that matters most to me is how many watts are required for the device to produce a certain amount of useable lumens. In that (third) context, "cooler" might mean "how many - or few - BTU's of cooling are required to counteract the effect of enough devices needed to generate XYZ lumens?" In that analysis, an 8 watt device that throws off 400 useable lumens is twice as "cool" as a device that requires 16 watts (or two 8-watt devices) to produce the same amount of light.

Got one at our local Home Depot. It was $9.97 on the shelf tag. However, our HD people are super-friendly these days, suggested: "Just take one to the checkout and ask for a price-match, telling her/him there are other HD stores selling it for $7.97 (just as I told him)." Well, it worked - we paid $7.97 (+tax, of course), no question asked!

So, I say, they are very accommodating too!

Who cares about the physics behind it. Buy it, don't like it...return it

tonglu1 said:   Got one at our local Home Depot. It was $9.97 on the shelf tag. However, our HD people are super-friendly these days, suggested: "Just take one to the checkout and ask for a price-match, telling her/him there are other HD stores selling it for $7.97 (just as I told him)." Well, it worked - we paid $7.97 (+tax, of course), no question asked!

So, I say, they are very accommodating too!


How did they confirm that it is $7.97 elsewhere (other HD stores)? Did you bring along a printout or something?

Billygoats said:   tonglu1 said:   Got one at our local Home Depot. It was $9.97 on the shelf tag. However, our HD people are super-friendly these days, suggested: "Just take one to the checkout and ask for a price-match, telling her/him there are other HD stores selling it for $7.97 (just as I told him)." Well, it worked - we paid $7.97 (+tax, of course), no question asked!

So, I say, they are very accommodating too!


How did they confirm that it is $7.97 elsewhere (other HD stores)? Did you bring along a printout or something?


They did not ask for any proof. Nor did I have anything to prove it, except what I read here from OP (which I assumed it was true).

The gentleman even suggested that I just take 1 to the checkout and ask for a price match which I did!



Disclaimer: By providing links to other sites, FatWallet.com does not guarantee, approve or endorse the information or products available at these sites, nor does a link indicate any association with or endorsement by the linked site to FatWallet.com.

Thanks for visiting FatWallet.com. Join for free to remove this ad.

TRUSTe online privacy certification

While FatWallet makes every effort to post correct information, offers are subject to change without notice.
Some exclusions may apply based upon merchant policies.
© 1999-2014