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Thruster 700c Men's Fixie Bike (21.51kB)
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all of you need to spend some time over at bikeforums.net

it will answer all of your questions.

enrohT (Sep. 10, 2012 @ 7:16p) |

When it's all said, the deal still looks good.

jumpattack (Sep. 10, 2012 @ 11:59p) |

I'm more or less amazed that you can build a full bike for this price--no matter how poor the build quality. Hell, the s... (more)

loquito316 (Sep. 11, 2012 @ 7:47a) |

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While it may be cheap, I would recommend something from BikesDirect before WalMart. It is a cheap way to try a fixed gear, but I bet you would want to replace almost all the parts on the Thruster if you plan to put any sort of miles on the bike.

LiquidSilver said:   While it may be cheap, I would recommend something from BikesDirect before WalMart. It is a cheap way to try a fixed gear, but I bet you would want to replace almost all the parts on the Thruster is you plan to put any sort of miles on the bike.

Thanks for the info. I am not a bike rider and would like to buy one to ride around the neighborhood with my kids. I'm not plnning to use to for any sort of commute. Would you recommend something from Bikesdirect?

From the reviews, I see that it comes with a flip-flop hub; that means you pop out the rear wheel, flip it the other direction, and get to choose between freewheeling (normal single speed) and fixed. I imagine you could replace one side with your choice of a different size in fixed or free, giving you two gears (you'd need to add a tensioner though).

Also from the reviews, it seems people are largely happy with it - but many are people who know how to do their own wrenching and disassembled/reassembled everything before riding it. The bearings are too tight (easy to fix), and the wheels are built horribly so you have to be confident at wheel work.

Finally, one reviewer says that it's 29 pounds. That's pretty decent for a $100 WalMart bike.

I could see me buying this, given some different conditions, especially if I'd been wanting a fixie/SS but haven't had the budget. The only severely offensive issue would be the plastic brake levers and stamped steel brakes, but I could replace those for cheap or free.

Pretty cool to see this sort of thing from WalMart. I remember when you couldn't get bikes with 700c wheels or drop bars (not that this bike has them, but others there do) from WalMart and other general-purpose retailers...just mountain-style and hybrid bikes. I guess this means that enthusiast cycling as a hobby is increasing in popularity, and probably it also relates to the state of the economy.

ach1199 said:   Thanks for the info. I am not a bike rider and would like to buy one to ride around the neighborhood with my kids. I'm not plnning to use to for any sort of commute. Would you recommend something from Bikesdirect?
IMO, if you really expect only to ever ride around the neighborhood with children (no serious fitness training/sporting/commuting), any bike will do; just look for one that seems comfortable and doesn't break the bank.

If you think you might want to get more serious with it and have a low budget then a used bike is your best option, after doing some research about what will fit your body and your intended style of riding. You'd want to avoid brands sold at stores like WalMart. The engineering, materials, workmanship, and assembly are usually severely deficient and not only expose serious riders to danger but also detract from daily enjoyment. Department store bikes are best used for less serious riding, and for experienced but low-budget cyclists who can modify and rebuild it into a more usable machine.

Please don't take my opinions as elitism; I am the antithesis of the elitist spandex-clad wannabe racer stereotype...I'm just realistic about what's what.

This is a great deal, anyone that know about this bike needs to step up and tell everyone how good of a deal this is.

Biggest issue is it's a "on size fits all" situation. Which means about a third of the people who buy it will actually be comfortable riding it. My guess is that it's probably in the 54-56cm range, but I'd be curious if anyone has actually measurements. I ride a 63cm, so I know I won't be buying one, but it might help others out.

ProppaT said:   Biggest issue is it's a "on size fits all" situation. Which means about a third of the people who buy it will actually be comfortable riding it. My guess is that it's probably in the 54-56cm range, but I'd be curious if anyone has actually measurements. I ride a 63cm, so I know I won't be buying one, but it might help others out.I saw this bike at WalMart yesterday. I don't remember the price but it was for sure >$100.

I can get some measurements if you tell me what is needed.

I saw it also and tempted to buy it. Seems great quality for the price!

maybe a stupid question to some but what is a "fixie"?

A fixed-gear bicycle (or fixed-wheel bicycle, sometimes known as a fixie) (Google is your friend!)

nomonies said:   maybe a stupid question to some but what is a "fixie"?

delete

A fixie is a bicycle whose pedals spin whenever the wheel spins; you cannot backpedal (unless you are riding backwards) or stop pedaling (unless the bicycle is stopped). In the past they were used mainly for track racing. Some people have found them to be useful and natural for city riding, and as a training aid they help a sporting cyclist improve his pedaling technique as well as fitness. The simplistic drivetrain requires less maintenance and has less potential for failure.

They have become trendy and hip lately, outside of the hardcore cyclists that have enjoyed them in the past. As for me, I'll keep freewheeling, thank you very much...no fixie for me.

The bike in this thread can also be freewheeled, it converts between fixed and free easily.

thc said:   From the reviews, I see that it comes with a flip-flop hub; that means you pop out the rear wheel, flip it the other direction, and get to choose between freewheeling (normal single speed) and fixed. I imagine you could replace one side with your choice of a different size in fixed or free, giving you two gears (you'd need to add a tensioner though).

Also from the reviews, it seems people are largely happy with it - but many are people who know how to do their own wrenching and disassembled/reassembled everything before riding it. The bearings are too tight (easy to fix), and the wheels are built horribly so you have to be confident at wheel work.

Finally, one reviewer says that it's 29 pounds. That's pretty decent for a $100 WalMart bike.

I could see me buying this, given some different conditions, especially if I'd been wanting a fixie/SS but haven't had the budget. The only severely offensive issue would be the plastic brake levers and stamped steel brakes, but I could replace those for cheap or free.

Pretty cool to see this sort of thing from WalMart. I remember when you couldn't get bikes with 700c wheels or drop bars (not that this bike has them, but others there do) from WalMart and other general-purpose retailers...just mountain-style and hybrid bikes. I guess this means that enthusiast cycling as a hobby is increasing in popularity, and probably it also relates to the state of the economy.


Howz GMC Denali ($160 at WalMart) compare to this one? I never rode a bike in last 20+ years but want to get one for getting some workout.

chaddi said:   Howz GMC Denali ($160 at WalMart) compare to this one? I never rode a bike in last 20+ years but want to get one for getting some workout.
The GMC Denali is a more normal configuration with multiple gears, which likely will be more enjoyable. The reviews indicate better quality than the Thruster fixie. They're both very heavy and made with inferior components, but if you're dead-set on a WalMart/Target/toysrus/etc bike instead of a better used bike then the GMC Denali is likely to be a better choice for your needs.

See also my rant from earlier in this thread:
thc said:   ach1199 said:   Thanks for the info. I am not a bike rider and would like to buy one to ride around the neighborhood with my kids. I'm not plnning to use to for any sort of commute. Would you recommend something from Bikesdirect?
IMO, if you really expect only to ever ride around the neighborhood with children (no serious fitness training/sporting/commuting), any bike will do; just look for one that seems comfortable and doesn't break the bank.

If you think you might want to get more serious with it and have a low budget then a used bike is your best option, after doing some research about what will fit your body and your intended style of riding. You'd want to avoid brands sold at stores like WalMart. The engineering, materials, workmanship, and assembly are usually severely deficient and not only expose serious riders to danger but also detract from daily enjoyment. Department store bikes are best used for less serious riding, and for experienced but low-budget cyclists who can modify and rebuild it into a more usable machine.

Please don't take my opinions as elitism; I am the antithesis of the elitist spandex-clad wannabe racer stereotype...I'm just realistic about what's what.


Side note: Shouldn't the "GMC Denali" name be for an off-road or cargo bike, rather than a road (ostensibly, road racing) bike?

Debating between a fixie and a beach cruiser for a summer night rides. I know they're complete opposites, but $100 for a fixie, you just can't beat it.

I got one. For $100, a new bike that you can ride around and feel the wind in your hair (I have no more hair though), it is a pretty good deal. I stripped my down to the bare essentials and hope to replace the colored tires someday. Maybe go with some thinner Kenda Kwest tires. I don't like shopping at WalMart, but a deal is a deal. As a bonus, working on the bike was fun and therapeutic. I used to have a Specialized mountain bike, but I am a bike novice.

I took the plunge on one of these 2 days ago. I figured for the price of two tanks of gas, I can save that in gas over the next year, if not sooner. I am unemployed at the moment so money is tight(!). It is still sitting in the back of my SUV. 1) It has been raining every day and 2) I am waiting to see if I got any buyers remorse before taking all the tags and paperwork off of it. I have read all the reviews on the w-mart site and it seems to be well liked, even by the bike enthusiasts who had purchased one. They (the bike enthusiast) all seemed to agree that the bearings were too tight. I don't want to double the price of the bike by having to take it to a bike shop to have it properly tuned (I also didn't want to give them the chance to laugh at me when I rolled this thing into their shop). I am pretty handy, an electrician by trade, but have never worked on bicycles before. Thank god for youtube, you can find demonstrations on how to do most anything. I don't think I will try to tackle the bottom bracket bearings, as I think you need special tools, more so than the cone wrench and spoke wrench I bought off eBay. Any input on that would be appreciated.

saemtm, I don't think a bike shop guy would laugh (even internally). You roll in there with a 40 pound singlespeed/fixie, they're going to assume you're one hell of a strong rider.

Anyway here's some wrenching and low-budget advice:

1. Read Sheldon Brown's site and google for a PDF of Barnett's manual (there's a complete copy that's easy to find, I think it's 5th edition).

2. For specialty tools, there are some that you can make at home out of cheap junk. Google, bike forums, and the rec.bicycles.tech newsgroup are your friends.

3. Rescue some curbside bikes on trash day and practice on them before you mess up your new ride.

4. There are endless chain lube debates on bike forums just as there are endless oil change debates on car forums, religious and political debates everywhere, etc. Most, however, will agree that you should never use WD-40 as a lubricant anywhere on your bicycle. Most other things people use are acceptable. Also, most people (including manufacturers) agree that the chain comes from the factory with the best lube it'll ever have so don't dilute or wash that out until it's noisy or too dirty.

(Lately I like Dupont Teflon Dry Multi-Use Lubricant spray, which comes in a spraypaint-sized can for $5 at Lowes/Home Depot; it seems to be the same as the Finish Line dry teflon lube I've been buying at a much higher price from bike shops for 15 years.)

5. Where grease is necessary, such as bearings, cheap grease from the automotive department at WalMart ought to suffice.

If I remember more, I'll post...stay tuned.

Good lord. Most of people here asking about the bike should probably check up your local craiglist and find yourself a used schwinn or what have you.

There are generally great bargains out there and would probably suit you better than a fixie from WalMart.

If you haven't ridden in a long time, fixie is probably not your first choice to start biking again with. (I just saw that this one has brakes on it). But anyhow, you should use the freewheel option first...

I agree that a fixie is a bad choice for a novice-- but this has a flipflop hub, so this bike is still ok.

What height person is this bike best for?

One size fits all? seriously?

even 29lb's is too much for a fixie.

all of you need to spend some time over at bikeforums.net

it will answer all of your questions.

When it's all said, the deal still looks good.

I'm more or less amazed that you can build a full bike for this price--no matter how poor the build quality. Hell, the stem on my track (racing) bike cost more than this entire bike!



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