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El Linko

Includes a nice scope, motor drive and a good lens kit.

Note: The motor drive is NOT a goto system. You find what you want to look at then use it to track the object.

Just the scope is $160 if you just need that.

AMZN link with reviews ($210 for just the scope there)



What's Included

"The Sky" Level 1 Planetarium Software, Bundled Items


Description

Explorer Bundle includes


Celestron AstroMaster 114 EQ Reflector Telescope ($160 value)
Celestron Motor Drive for AstroMaster Telescopes ($43)
Zhumell Eyepiece and Filter Kit ($115)

The Zhumell Telescope 1.25 Inch Eyepiece and Filter Kit includes:


■4mm high-grade eyepiece - 5mm Eye Relief, 50 Degree Apparent Field of View
■6mm high-grade eyepiece - 6mm Eye Relief, 50 Degree Apparent Field of View
■12.5mm high-grade eyepiece - 15mm Eye Relief, 50 Degree Apparent Field of View
■32mm high-grade eyepiece - 20mm Eye Relief, 52 Degree Apparent Field of View
■2x Achromatic Barlow Lens
■#12 Yellow filter
■#21 Orange filter
■#23A Light Red filter
■#56 Green filter
■#82A Light Blue filter
■Polarizing filters
■CrystalView Moon filter
■Aluminum-sided eye-piece and filter case



The Explorer Bundle is the next step in enjoyment of your AstroMaster telescope. This package includes the telescope, the motor drive and the Zhumell Eyepiece and Filter kit. This kit includes all of the eyepieces for different levels of magnification and also includes a set of lunar and color filters.

Member Summary

Celestron Astromaster 114 EQ Reflector Telescope Bundle
Thanks Valtron9000
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moon
Thanks GudSpellur
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saturn
Thanks GudSpellur
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Staff Summary
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If you're thinking about getting in on this, here's a couple great links to get you started

AstroMaster 114EQ Survival Guide

114EQ eview


IMO, the kit is good, but not great. For the money, I'd get the 130EQ scope (which gives you an extra 16mm of aperture) and add the filters and motor later if needed. I have the 130EQ and it's a great beginner scope. The 114 is a Bird-Jones design which can be a pain to collimate.

EDIT: The kit is very good. Specially with the included Lens and filters.

R4M0N said:   
IMO, the kit is good, but not great. For the money, I'd get the 130EQ scope and add the filters and motor later if needed. I have the 130EQ and it's a great beginner scope.


Just curious, what do you look at, and how hard is it to find things?

R4M0N said:   If you're thinking about getting in on this, here's a great link to get you started

AstroMaster 114EQ Survival Guide


IMO, the kit is good, but not great. For the money, I'd get the 130EQ scope (which gives you an extra 16mm of aperture) and add the filters and motor later if needed. I have the 130EQ and it's a great beginner scope. The 114 is a Bird-Jones design which can be a pain to collimate.


I think the price on this bundle is great for a beginner. The lens kit alone sells for $115 here and will be helpful in the "wow factor" when they first use this setup. The motor drive will make it less tedious for new users as well.

The 130mm scope is of course a better one, just looking at value though I prefer this one.

scrab4deal said:   R4M0N said:   
IMO, the kit is good, but not great. For the money, I'd get the 130EQ scope and add the filters and motor later if needed. I have the 130EQ and it's a great beginner scope.


Just curious, what do you look at, and how hard is it to find things?


Jupiter, the Moon (of course), Saturn, Mars and the Orion Nebula are a few of the things I've seen. Most people think they will see the same images they see on Hubble photographs and that's not nearly the case. For example, if you point it towards Jupiter you will see it and at least 4 of its moons. Jupiter will be about the size of a pencil eraser. So will be Saturn but the ring around it will put a smile on your face (it's just like in the drawings).

With a 2x Barlow and my 10mm eye piece, I can faintly see Jupiter's bands.

The moon is impressive in detail.

Orion Nebula is just a fuzzy cluster of stars but you can definitely tell it's a different body because all around it is dark and then you have this are of dark gray with a few bright stars inside. It's location is just under the middle star in Orion's belt.

One of the most useful purchases after the telescope is a Barlow Lens and a better viewfinder. The viewfinder on these entry level scopes are nearly useless. They way I find things is to put the eye piece with the largest field of view and find my target and center it, then I gradually move to a more powerful (but narrower field of view) lens and then I add the Barlow Lens to multiply the power of the eye piece to get a larger image.

Once you get the hang of it, you will be able to center almost any target within a few minutes.

GudSpellur said:   R4M0N said:   If you're thinking about getting in on this, here's a great link to get you started

AstroMaster 114EQ Survival Guide


IMO, the kit is good, but not great. For the money, I'd get the 130EQ scope (which gives you an extra 16mm of aperture) and add the filters and motor later if needed. I have the 130EQ and it's a great beginner scope. The 114 is a Bird-Jones design which can be a pain to collimate.


I think the price on this bundle is great for a beginner. The lens kit alone sells for $115 here and will be helpful in the "wow factor" when they first use this setup. The motor drive will make it less tedious for new users as well.

The 130mm scope is of course a better one, just looking at value though I prefer this one.


I see your point... After seeing what's included, the filter kit is really what makes it a great deal and it can be used with a more powerful scope later down the road if the bug catches on (which usually does after seeing the first Planet).

I'm a cheap-ass, so I just track manually... LOL. One thing though is for that motor to help tracking correctly, the scope has to be aligned correctly and that can be a pain. I'm also lazy, so I don't align my scope that well almost ever. I just set it in the neighborhood of north and start star hopping.

R4M0N said:   scrab4deal said:   R4M0N said:   
IMO, the kit is good, but not great. For the money, I'd get the 130EQ scope and add the filters and motor later if needed. I have the 130EQ and it's a great beginner scope.


Just curious, what do you look at, and how hard is it to find things?


Jupiter, the Moon (of course), Saturn, Mars and the Orion Nebula are a few of the things I've seen. Most people think they will see the same images they see on Hubble photographs and that's not nearly the case. For example, if you point it towards Jupiter you will see it and at least 4 of its moons. Jupiter will be about the size of a pencil eraser. So will be Saturn but the ring around it will put a smile on your face (it's just like in the drawings).

One of the most useful purchases after the telescope is a Barlow Lens and a better viewfinder. The viewfinder on these entry level scopes are nearly useless. They way I find things is to put the eye piece with the largest field of view and find my target and center it, then I gradually move to a more powerful (but narrower field of view) lens and then I add the Barlow Lens to multiply the power of the eye piece to get a larger image.

Once you get the hang of it, you will be able to center almost any target within a few minutes.


FYI This lens kit includes the Barlow. I updated the OP.

Curious, is this a kit that someone could attach a Nikon DSLR to? Obviously I'd need some mechanism to hook the camera up to the telescope -- or is this far too beginnerish to do that? I'll continue research -- thanks for the links in the thread!

freddie4x4 said:   Curious, is this a kit that someone could attach a Nikon DSLR to? Obviously I'd need some mechanism to hook the camera up to the telescope -- or is this far too beginnerish to do that? I'll continue research -- thanks for the links in the thread!

It will cost you $12 to do that

GudSpellur said:   freddie4x4 said:   Curious, is this a kit that someone could attach a Nikon DSLR to? Obviously I'd need some mechanism to hook the camera up to the telescope -- or is this far too beginnerish to do that? I'll continue research -- thanks for the links in the thread!

It will cost you $12 to do that


I have not tried this scope but be aware that the focus point of the DSLR may not be reached. Long story short, when you attach the camera, the camera may not come to focus. There is no way to know till you try it. The camera needs to be racked in on the focuser much more than a typical eyepiece to reach focus.

Also it costs more than $12. That is just the T-ring. You need the 1.25" adapter too. Frankly, this is not a great scope anyway.

JamesTKirk said:   GudSpellur said:   freddie4x4 said:   Curious, is this a kit that someone could attach a Nikon DSLR to? Obviously I'd need some mechanism to hook the camera up to the telescope -- or is this far too beginnerish to do that? I'll continue research -- thanks for the links in the thread!

It will cost you $12 to do that


I have not tried this scope but be aware that the focus point of the DSLR may not be reached. Long story short, when you attach the camera, the camera may not come to focus. There is no way to know till you try it. The camera needs to be racked in on the focuser much more than a typical eyepiece to reach focus.

Also it costs more than $12. That is just the T-ring. You need the 1.25" adapter too. Frankly, this is not a great scope anyway.


I forgot about that.

Ultratelephoto photography is easily achieved with your telescope by purchasing this Celestron SLR Camera Adapter with Integral 2x Barlow Lens. You'll need to take precautions to minimize vibrations, such as locking up the mirror if possible as well as using a cable release or remote control to fire the shutter. This SLR adapter's got a built-in 2x barlow lens to assure that any telescope can achieve proper focus, but many telescopes will be able to use it with the barlow attachment removed if you prefer. It will depend upon how much in-travel your focuer barrel has at its disposal. It can, of course, also be used on a catadioptric scope which has a 1.25" focuser barrel.

First, remove the eyepiece. Next, attach the SLR camera adapter where the eyepiece would normally be attached to the telescope, and screw in a t-mount adapter to the opposite end of the SLR camera adapter. Now you can attach your camera to the t-mount and you are ready to begin taking pictures!

Note! Your camera will need to be in fully manual exposure mode, although some brands of camera may also work in aperture-priority autoexposure mode. Additionally, if there is a switch on the camera which chooses the focus mode, that switch must indicate manual focusing.

Inserts in to 1.25" focusers Requires T-mount SLR adapter (listed here as accessories) Incorporates 2x magnification Built-in barlow lens can be removed (some telescopes will not focus properly without barlow)

After 40 years in the hobby I have never seen a "good" quality 4.5" Celestron reflector. Celestron's quality has been in decline for years since Tasco bought them in the 1990s. My main scope right now is an original (almost antique) Celestron C8.

There are few things that will quickly kill a person's (child's) interest in the hobby than to make their first observation through a POC scope. For this amount of green consider a good quality pair of binoculars. The binos will provide lower magnification but a much larger FOV.

El Bumpo!

A massive $5 price drop.



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