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These were the drives that had a lot of problems.

VirtuaL said:   These were the drives that had a lot of problems.

Here we go again.... Everyone repeats what they hear with no first hand experience...

Richardito said:   VirtuaL said:   These were the drives that had a lot of problems.

Here we go again.... Everyone repeats what they hear with no first hand experience...


You are right!
I have been using this for almost two years now. No problem at all.
Good price.

Richardito said:   VirtuaL said:   These were the drives that had a lot of problems.

Here we go again.... Everyone repeats what they hear with no first hand experience...


Why go through the trouble of first-hand experience (pain), when nearly 30% of Newegg buyers report DOA or failures early in drive usage?

Unless your data isn't important to you, move along. Nothing to see here.

The Seagate 7200.11 has one of the highest failure rate as reported by a Russian report by Storelab. I have read a few other articles regarding problems with the 7200.11 drive. I have the 7200.12 and three 7200.14 models, these caused no problems.

If everybody uses reliability studies, then nobody would buy any cars except the Japanese cars. It is a matter of probability and other factors.

VirtuaL is making a statement with good intention. The question is that if we have to have first hand experience to make any statement?

The most common problem with these drives was faulty firmware and those with this problem died soon. This drive does come with a two year warranty, longer than some of the newer drives Seagate sells. Maybe they've fixed the firmware by now. At any rate, most of the failures should be covered by the warranty. Any drive drive can fail. Keep everything important backed up.

I'd like to add that data stored in a high-failure drive is Crucial and important to me. Plus other factors like time (=$$$$) and energy loss to recover those data. What if the one shipping out is amongst the 30%.... Warranty ? not worth the trouble with Seagate.

Hard drive technology and its manufacturing process have been improving in the last few years. No need to settle for the second best. There are other choices out there for the same capacity and price range.



TimInHollywood said:   Richardito said:   VirtuaL said:   These were the drives that had a lot of problems.

Here we go again.... Everyone repeats what they hear with no first hand experience...


Why go through the trouble of first-hand experience (pain), when nearly 30% of Newegg buyers report DOA or failures early in drive usage?

Unless your data isn't important to you, move along. Nothing to see here.

whyme1 said:   The Seagate 7200.11 has one of the highest failure rate as reported by a Russian report by Storelab. I have read a few other articles regarding problems with the 7200.11 drive. I have the 7200.12 and three 7200.14 models, these caused no problems.The same Russian company said most of the 7200.11 failures were due to the firmware bug that was eliminated with a firmware update, but 7200.12 and newer Seagates also had a different mechanical design that prevented the motor shaft from seizing. I've read of some people buying every cheap 7200.11 and having great success fixing them by doing nothing but updating the firmware by following directions in the best (and longest) thread about 7200.11 problems and solutions.

larrymoencurly said:   whyme1 said:   The Seagate 7200.11 has one of the highest failure rate as reported by a Russian report by Storelab. I have read a few other articles regarding problems with the 7200.11 drive. I have the 7200.12 and three 7200.14 models, these caused no problems.The same Russian company said most of the 7200.11 failures were due to the firmware bug that was eliminated with a firmware update, but 7200.12 and newer Seagates also had a different mechanical design that prevented the motor shaft from seizing. I've read of some people buying every cheap 7200.11 and having great success fixing them by doing nothing but updating the firmware by following directions in the best (and longest) thread about 7200.11 problems and solutions.

My question is: if this problem has been ongoing and known by Seagate since 01-2009, then why didn't or don't just fix the problem at the factory?

What am I missing?

chard31 said:   larrymoencurly said:   whyme1 said:   The Seagate 7200.11 has one of the highest failure rate as reported by a Russian report by Storelab. I have read a few other articles regarding problems with the 7200.11 drive. I have the 7200.12 and three 7200.14 models, these caused no problems.The same Russian company said most of the 7200.11 failures were due to the firmware bug that was eliminated with a firmware update, but 7200.12 and newer Seagates also had a different mechanical design that prevented the motor shaft from seizing. I've read of some people buying every cheap 7200.11 and having great success fixing them by doing nothing but updating the firmware by following directions in the best (and longest) thread about 7200.11 problems and solutions.My question is: if this problem has been ongoing and known by Seagate since 01-2009, then why didn't or don't just fix the problem at the factory?Probably because it was wierd and unexpected, but apparently any 7200.11 made since early 2009 came from the factory with updated firmware to solve it.

I have good first hand experience and urge everyone to STAY AWAY from these drives.

I bought my first one in late 2008, that one failed in 2009 and was replaced under warranty with the updated firmware model. When I read about the problems others were still having, I bought a second one on sale at the Egg to set up a RAID configuration, this one also came with the new firmware. That drive died about a year later and was replaced under warranty. Fast forward another year and the first replacement failed, making 3 failures. Seagate agreed to replace the failed and the still working drive with the new model and those (thus far) are running fine.

Before someone asks, I am running an Antec case with two 120mm front fans right in front of the drives, and the system runs with large thermal margins. I am not a gamer and this system gets only about 2 hours of use per day.

HighTechnology said:   I have good first hand experience and urge everyone to STAY AWAY from these drives.

I bought my first one in late 2008, that one failed in 2009 and was replaced under warranty with the updated firmware model. When I read about the problems others were still having, I bought a second one on sale at the Egg to set up a RAID configuration, this one also came with the new firmware. That drive died about a year later and was replaced under warranty. Fast forward another year and the first replacement failed, making 3 failures. Seagate agreed to replace the failed and the still working drive with the new model and those (thus far) are running fine.
What happened when they died? I believe the firmware problem causes the drives to not be recognized. I think they still spin, at least just after power is applied.

larrymoencurly said:   
What happened when they died? I believe the firmware problem causes the drives to not be recognized. I think they still spin, at least just after power is applied.


The first two definitely started clicking and wouldn't spin up. I really didn't try to troubleshoot the third one too much, so all I can say is that the RAID bios reported the drive as FAILED and it wouldn't spin up (but I don't remember if it was clicking). At that point, I just called Seagate and told them that I now had 3 failures and I wanted them to replace them with the new model.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822148725

For $10 more, this seems like a "safer" deal...

chard31 said:   http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822148725

For $10 more, this seems like a "safer" deal...


This one is a 5900 RPM drive versus the original's 7200 RPM. May make a difference, primarily when used as the boot drive.

Save copies of your receipts and make sure you buy with a credit card with warranty extension. I have nine of these in a RAID configuration. I bought them at different times because they were so cheap. Four out of the nine have failed on me in the last 3 years. Each time it happened, I replaced under the two way ship warranty service. These drives originally had a five-year warranty. They are a good deal when they had the five year warranty and were cheap. The warranty now is only 2 years.



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