• Go to page :
  • 12 3
  • Text Only
mbrenner said:   dts said:   I have the UV 5R Plus, but got shipped with chinese speaking. Can anyone help me with getting it changed to english? DTS589@msn.com Thanks

Should be MENU 14, MENU, then hit up arrow a few times until you see "ENG" then hit MENU to confirm then exit. Your choices should be ENG, CHI, and OFF. The plus models should have english, osime older ones are Chinese only.

Or I suppose you could learn Chinese (whatever regional dialect the radio speaks).


The original firmware versions had the Chinese-accented English, not Chinese.

prayerfails said:   
Check this radio/phone out:

Puxing PX-D03, I have one. Pretty cool and worth the few extra dollars. A little tricky to get used to but it works!


Worth the few extra dollars? It's $176 vs $43.

Noticed that the UV-5RUU is pretty much the same thing except it operates from 400-520MHz.. If you need channels over 470Mhz, then this might be your best choice..

Hypnosis4u2nv said:   Noticed that the UV-5RUU is pretty much the same thing except it operates from 400-520MHz.. If you need channels over 470Mhz, then this might be your best choice..

On the UV-5R Plus that range is also available. The limits are selectable by the software up to 520.

I have seen that the software would include all models of UV-5R, including the UV-5RA..

What are the differences between the various UV-5R models on 409shop.com or Amazon.com? The UV-5R, UV-5R plus, UV-5RE, etc ...?

How many days do you get the product?egs said:   I just ran across the non-Plus version (UV-5R) here for $43.99 (free shipping from overseas):

http://www.marcmart.com/two-way-radio-baofeng-uv-5r-professional...

The supposed better build quality of the UV-5R+ has me thinking that may be the better route (even though I prefer the looks of the UV-5R). Since the UV-5R+ came out recently, I would guess we'll see the price drop some more soon.


Serious question. What if someone got one of these, powered it up, and started transmitting away without a license? No, I'm not doing (or planning on doing so - have zero interest in HAM) but genuinely wondering what the repercussions are. How would one get caught?

Nevermind, found some related stuff online:

http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=92862

Looks like heavy fines (up to $10k) and jail-time. Wow-wee!

I bought another one while the price was at $40. This one has firmware 293 and is labeled as part 90 compliant with the FCC ID number.

My agency settled on the Icom F3011 for the radios that we issue. We are recommending UV-5R for those who want to own one to keep in their personal gear.

coolbreeze said:   Serious question. What if someone got one of these, powered it up, and started transmitting away without a license? No, I'm not doing (or planning on doing so - have zero interest in HAM) but genuinely wondering what the repercussions are. How would one get caught?

Nevermind, found some related stuff online:

http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=92862

Looks like heavy fines (up to $10k) and jail-time. Wow-wee!



It depends heavily on where and when you do it; yes, all those things could happen to you. The reality is it's like peeing in the bushes on a public street while drunk - if the wrong person witnesses you doing it, you could get tossed in jail. The other reality is that amateur radio is a dying hobby, so in many places the chances of actually encountering people using those frequencies are increasingly rare, though the laws have not changed about unauthorized use. My mother and grandparents were some of the most prominent amateur radio operators of the 20th century, all 3 famous in various ways, and they all promoted the hobby. I remember growing up listening to my mother's daily sessions, and listening in wonder to the "woodpecker" (Russian jamming of various frequencies during the cold war) or to my mother talking to people in Japan, Europe and other places that seemed so far away. (These sorts of handheld rigs are obviously not designed for that). Those sorts of experiences was what the hobby was built on, and it was practically magical. That's all changed with modern communications but recognize that many amateurs grew up in that magic and fiercely still hold onto the rules and reasons for such things, and if they hear you breaking the rules they will go after you with all their ability. Also recognize that those rules are there for a reason - in case of a disaster of some sort, it's very possible that cell phone, internet and other communication could go to hell, and that's one of Ham radio's major missions, as Hams could potentially be one of the only sources of communication in that sort of scenario. So there's good reason not to disrupt the frequencies they use, or to misuse the (not in the case of these little radios, but sometimes very powerful) equipment.

The amateur bands are where you are most likely to be caught transmitting without a license. Amateur traffic has a very distinct sound and unlawful transmissions will stick out. Also, since it is their hobby, they will delight at the opportunity to track down your illegal transmitter.

Instead of transmitting unlawfully, just transmit on the MURS frequencies and do it almost legally. I say almost because you will probably exceed the permitted transmit power, but nobody will care.

Thanks. I needed a couple for the upcoming zombie apocalypse.



Disclaimer: By providing links to other sites, FatWallet.com does not guarantee, approve or endorse the information or products available at these sites, nor does a link indicate any association with or endorsement by the linked site to FatWallet.com.

Thanks for visiting FatWallet.com. Join for free to remove this ad.

TRUSTe online privacy certification

While FatWallet makes every effort to post correct information, offers are subject to change without notice.
Some exclusions may apply based upon merchant policies.
© 1999-2014