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drizzle said:   The quantity of mercury in a CFL is sooo tiny vs. the amount in thermometers or old thermostats

This is true, however it's still possible that CFLs pose more of a threat overall. Thermometers and old thermostats typically are consumed in much smaller quantities and last much longer than CFL bulbs. They've also had mercury-free alternatives for some time. The thermostats have been illegal for sale in California since 2006 (you don't have to replace it if you've got one, but new mercury types can't be sold).

I'm not a doom-sayer and not trying to preach - we have many CFLs in our house. But I think we've bought our last, if I watch for good deals on LED, the absence of mercury and sometimes noticeably better performance are enough to justify the extra cost for me.

SlimTim said:   drizzle said:   The quantity of mercury in a CFL is sooo tiny vs. the amount in thermometers or old thermostats

This is true, however it's still possible that CFLs pose more of a threat overall. Thermometers and old thermostats typically are consumed in much smaller quantities and last much longer than CFL bulbs. They've also had mercury-free alternatives for some time. The thermostats have been illegal for sale in California since 2006 (you don't have to replace it if you've got one, but new mercury types can't be sold).

I'm not a doom-sayer and not trying to preach - we have many CFLs in our house. But I think we've bought our last, if I watch for good deals on LED, the absence of mercury and sometimes noticeably better performance are enough to justify the extra cost for me.


So the EPA thinks the amount of mercury in CFLs is not a problem but you do and but you're not a doom-sayer?

http://www.epa.gov/cfl/cfl-hg.html

peas said:   ezwrighter said:   I hate feit electronics. They are the worst of the worst bulbs. Can't go any lower.That's not universally true. Lowes' Utilitech brand is often made by Feit. Their new 40W equivalent candelabra LED is awesome. It's easily as bright as a 40 incandescent, light color is very pleasant, and it dims very smoothly. It's hard to find CFL/LED candelabras worth a darn and theirs is currently one of the best.

when i was looking for 25 watt candelabra leds i was disappointed by the utilitech ones. i ended up with philips bulbs which i am very happy with.

mm60 said:   Anybody been able to see this deal in Northern VA? May need to make a run to Costco, but do not have one close by.

Not in Leesburg.

The deal is less attractive now with $2 price increase. I stopped by today at a NJ Costco. Feit BR 30 Item # 661118 all disappeared but 2 left mixed in BR40 pile. These two rang up as $15.99 - $8 instant CPN = $7.99. The exact same item was $5.99 as OP posted. It was $15.99 - $10 instant CPN.

From the LoA article: "As another example, the company contended that one of its bulbs would last 30,000 hours. But tests determined that after only 1,000 hours the bulb lost 80% of its light output, the lawsuit said."

Is reduced brightness something that happens to all LEDs or does it vary by brand? This makes me worry that these Feit bulbs might also lost a lot of brightness after a few months of use. At least it's Costco, so you can return them down the road if need be.

fatwellatio said:   From the LoA article: "As another example, the company contended that one of its bulbs would last 30,000 hours. But tests determined that after only 1,000 hours the bulb lost 80% of its light output, the lawsuit said."

Is reduced brightness something that happens to all LEDs or does it vary by brand? This makes me worry that these Feit bulbs might also lost a lot of brightness after a few months of use. At least it's Costco, so you can return them down the road if need be.


Varies by brand and bulb.

I use the (far from cheap) Philips L-Prize bulb and it has been tested to show it maintains its lumen output.

REGIONAL rebate - add that to title as well as YMMV.

BR30 only $5.99 off in NY

Not available in MN

Hoogineer said:   Suffice it to say, my wife is not very comfortable with CFLs in the house:

I worked out the math once, and unless I missed a decimal, the total amount of mercury in a bulb was equivalent to a few pounds of swordfish.

Dunno if that's a testament to the safety of CFLs, or the danger of seafood.

mm60 said:   Anybody been able to see this deal in Northern VA? May need to make a run to Costco, but do not have one close by.

Not that I have seen. I bought a couple from the Springfield VA costco and they were still in the $17 range. So far the 2 I bought work well but its only been maybe a month.

I am not going to buy more unless the price drops a bite. My wife likes them and she is very picky but at $17ish each I am not opening my wallet at that price.

Not in Northern VA. The rebate is probably through the electric company and Dominion isn't participating. If you really want it, you might try in the Ellicott City or Baltimore region. They're serviced by BG&E. I know BG&E is doing the Philips LED bulb rebate at HD, so they may be doing this rebate also.

Guppeh said:   Hoogineer said:   Suffice it to say, my wife is not very comfortable with CFLs in the house:

I worked out the math once, and unless I missed a decimal, the total amount of mercury in a bulb was equivalent to a few pounds of swordfish.

Dunno if that's a testament to the safety of CFLs, or the danger of seafood.


Both are certainly small quantities, but the bottom line is not in dispute: Mercury is bad, less of it is better than more of it.

So CFLs are better than incandescent because even though they each contain a little mercury, the reduced energy usage results in less mercury generated via energy production.

LEDs are better still, as they contain no mercury at all and are roughly equivalent to CFL in energy usage.

The mercury from seafood or CFLs or energy production is not going to cause any of us to grow a third arm. But that's at least partly because of a Keen awareness of how dangerous mercury is and decades of investment and regulation reducing its presence.

xtacy78 said:   Not available in MN

Thank you for saving me the effort. Looking forward to when LED's are priced similar to CFL's and we can all save big energy.

Those are partly true but not a big deal. I have ten of these BR30's in my cans, bought at $16 a piece at Costco. Their color is just slightly whiter than incandescent or CFL but still warm and beautiful. Spread down the can is very good, no difference than dumb bulbs. I have tried CFLs in the can in the past and grew tired of them. The high temperature in the can deteriorates the CFLs so quickly they stopped working in only a few months (became yellow and very slow to ramp up intensity).

The LEDs don't turn on instantly as a dumb bulb (like speed-of-light fast) but the delay is like less than half a second. Not hard to get used to. It's like you press your car key button and the car takes a split second to beep but you never notice or are bothered - because we are used to it and take it for granted. But since every light turns on instantly, you will notice when a new one doesn't.

They are dimmable. These LEDs kind of work with regular dimmers, with a caviar: I have to keep at least one regular bulb in the parallel bulbs controlled by a switch. Say I have six cans controlled by one dimmer in the ceiling, I put 5 LED bulbs in it plus leaving one regular and they dimmed fine. If all six are LEDs they flicker and some won't even turn on.

The best solution is to use digital dimmers designed for LEDs. I believe they use PWM to dim instead of voltage regulation essentially due to the fact that LEDs don't work under a certain voltage and you just can't cut their voltage too much. I got from Home Depot a Lutron C/L dimmer and have switched to all LEDs now. Perfect to use with the $15 off Home Depot Paypal deal.

cgshopper said:   Amazon reviews say they are slow to come on and don't dim well. Your experience?

ezwrighter said:   I hate feit electronics. They are the worst of the worst bulbs. Can't go any lower.

I disagree. I have Feit CFL lights Par38 lights in my yard on a dusk/dawn timer ( so they are basically on for 12 hours/ day). In 3 years I have only replaced 1 out of 4 bulbs.

Inside my home I have more expensive earthmate dimmable CFL's. In 3 years I have replaced over 12 bulbs and they are on for shorter periods of time than the Feit ones and I don't dim the bulbs.

Bottomline - I love my Feit's


I wish I had a costco here I would buy these LED's and replace my earthmate's.

ezwrighter said:   I hate feit electronics. They are the worst of the worst bulbs. Can't go any lower.

I'm glad you said that. Over the years every Feit lightbulb I ever dealt with went out quickly and seemed eneemic (sp) when in use. I figured they were cheap enough that I could up more, but I think that's there business model so I didn't. Always wondered if I just got some unlucky batches ever since.

Screw feit. When you spend your dollars you are voting.

I had the same bad experience with Feit bulbs. And the LEDs are still too expensive.

only $5.00 instant in Van Nuys, CA location

My experience: Feit CFL's are junk. I'm guessing that their LEDs are no better.

HappyScrappyHeroPup said:   noodle04 said:   I have same question. Do I need to change switch in order to use this kind of LED dimmable bulbs?

Noodle

mmyk72 said:   Are dimmers for CFL/LED different than for regular bulbs? I have tons of dimmers in my house that were used for regular PAR30 bulbs. Now I don't know if it's ok to put a CFL BR30 into the socket (I just bought dimmable BR30 CFLs).


In theory, no. Most cheap dimmers should be okay with dimmable CFLs and LEDs. But in reality older ones don't seem to be.

Recent dimmers meant to dim CFL and incandescent (C-L marked dimmers, also known as leading edge dimmers) should be able to dim these LEDs too. Although some may only be able to dim a certain number of them at once (say 6 or 8 of them).


I have 2 to 4 CFLs on a circuit. My experience using a standard dimmer for CFL was that the lights did not dim properly. The range from on to off was a small fraction of the dimmer switch motion and they would sometimes respond differently to the dimmer switch motion. They did dim, but not in a useful or pleasing way. I replaced them with the Lutron dimmers specified for CFL/LED and the lights now dim nicely. With CFLs, they do not dim all the way down before they cut off. Useful, but not down to what I would consider "mood lighting" levels.

I purchased ecosmart CFLs at HD. I found that some CFLs in the same package made a lot of noise while others were quiet. One failed in a couple of hours. I returned the bad ones and they replacements have been working for 6 months now.

jim045 said:   HappyScrappyHeroPup said:   noodle04 said:   I have same question. Do I need to change switch in order to use this kind of LED dimmable bulbs?

Noodle

mmyk72 said:   Are dimmers for CFL/LED different than for regular bulbs? I have tons of dimmers in my house that were used for regular PAR30 bulbs. Now I don't know if it's ok to put a CFL BR30 into the socket (I just bought dimmable BR30 CFLs).


In theory, no. Most cheap dimmers should be okay with dimmable CFLs and LEDs. But in reality older ones don't seem to be.

Recent dimmers meant to dim CFL and incandescent (C-L marked dimmers, also known as leading edge dimmers) should be able to dim these LEDs too. Although some may only be able to dim a certain number of them at once (say 6 or 8 of them).


I have 2 to 4 CFLs on a circuit. My experience using a standard dimmer for CFL was that the lights did not dim properly. The range from on to off was a small fraction of the dimmer switch motion and they would sometimes respond differently to the dimmer switch motion. They did dim, but not in a useful or pleasing way. I replaced them with the Lutron dimmers specified for CFL/LED and the lights now dim nicely. With CFLs, they do not dim all the way down before they cut off. Useful, but not down to what I would consider "mood lighting" levels.

I purchased ecosmart CFLs at HD. I found that some CFLs in the same package made a lot of noise while others were quiet. One failed in a couple of hours. I returned the bad ones and they replacements have been working for 6 months now.


From my experience, CFLs BR30's don't dim near as well as regular PAR30 nor LED bulbs. Getting specialized switches helps a bit, but when you consider their cost, it just generally reduces the range that makes CFL's more acceptable, rather than making the performance any better. Also I found with CFL's if you dim them to their limits, they tend to switch off as they cool down.

The ecosmart 6" LED cans I brought actually work best on standard dimmers, as they are able to dim further with them. They are very consistent and don't have any buzzing issues.

cjbell said:   

The ecosmart 6" LED cans I brought actually work best on standard dimmers, as they are able to dim further with them. They are very consistent and don't have any buzzing issues.


Those are rebranded Cree CR6s and they are the best thing going in downlights. They're better than any LED bulb, CFL or even incandescent. The bee's knees.

They do cost more, but if you care about day to day use and not just the price they are the way to go.

UN0335 said:   I compared these Feit BR30s with the Ecosmart bulb from HD:

EcoSmart 14-Watt (75W) Soft White (2700K) BR30 LED Flood Light Bulb

The two bulbs were pretty much identical in output and color temperature. The only real difference I noticed was that the heatsinking on the HD bulb was much heavier duty. The Ecosmart bulb was just under 1 lb., where the Feit from Costco was 12 oz. Ecosmart has a flow-through heatsink with holes, where the Feit had fins only. These Feit bulbs get HOT!, and heat is no friend to LEDs and lumen maintenance.

fatwellatio said:   From the LoA article: "As another example, the company contended that one of its bulbs would last 30,000 hours. But tests determined that after only 1,000 hours the bulb lost 80% of its light output, the lawsuit said."

Is reduced brightness something that happens to all LEDs or does it vary by brand? This makes me worry that these Feit bulbs might also lost a lot of brightness after a few months of use. At least it's Costco, so you can return them down the road if need be.


I've had LED spots die in a few months, because of overheating (bad heat sinks). Most LED bulbs get hot, but too hot is a problem. Most manufacturers recommend open lamps and no ceiling cans, both for the fire hazard and the diminishing lifespan of the bulbs.

i bought 1 from costco for 17.00 took it back cause i did not like them but if they was 5.00 when i bought them i think i would of keep them. i went with the ecosmart 24.95 from Home Depot

HappyScrappyHeroPup said:   I heartily recommend not putting LED reflector bulbs in recessed cans. CREE CR6s are more efficient, dim better, produce better light and as an added bonus form a decent seal with your ceiling so that heat from the room doesn't go up through the can into your attic costing you money (of course this doesn't apply if the space above a room is not an attic). And if you buy The Home Depot version they're reasonably priced too.

Not putting down Feit in general, just saying for the intended purpose of these bulbs there are noticeably better options.


I agree with this post 100%. In my area (Sacramento) these are going for <$25 and the difference between retrofitting a 6" can with this product vs. a Feit lamp in night and day.

How did you get the $10 instant rebate?

FWIW I bought feit dimmable br30's a year or so ago from Costco for our kitchen. We have six resessed cans in the ceiling on two switches. My experience is mixed two failed within a year and the time it takes for them to reach full brightness is way too long. Just replaced them with non dimmable cfl's from HD for 12.99/box of 6.

I would love to find some reliable dimmable br30 that go from dark to bright in the flip of a switch.

clairevasquez said:   How did you get the $10 instant rebate?

The CFL and LED bulb IRs are often a function of the utility company in various areas.
It would be useful for posters to indicate locations where purchased/observed and the valid IR dates (usually on the shelf card at Costco).

charliebeagledog said:   FWIW I bought feit dimmable br30's a year or so ago from Costco for our kitchen. We have six resessed cans in the ceiling on two switches. My experience is mixed two failed within a year and the time it takes for them to reach full brightness is way too long. Just replaced them with non dimmable cfl's from HD for 12.99/box of 6.

I would love to find some reliable dimmable br30 that go from dark to bright in the flip of a switch.


Check out these: http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1v/R-202240932/h_d2/ProductDi...

Bought them for the kitchen and basement - they are awesome. No delay at startup. Were $24.97 near me (with utility coupon) and I had a bunch of the HD $50 off $100 coupons. Boiled down to about $12 per.

charliebeagledog said:   FWIW I bought feit dimmable br30's a year or so ago from Costco for our kitchen. We have six resessed cans in the ceiling on two switches. My experience is mixed two failed within a year and the time it takes for them to reach full brightness is way too long.Take them back to CostCo and get your money back. Maybe they'll take the hint and stop selling FEIT

Where do you find the instant rebate the Costco lights..I am new..

amgen1 said:   Where do you find the instant rebate the Costco lights..I am new..

Allow me to shed some light with an answer : At those Costco warehouses where the local utilities are providing them.

The thread title should reflect YMMV and comments should reference locations where available, $-IR-amounts available, and IR time period.

marvshields said:   i bought 1 from costco for 17.00 took it back cause i did not like them but if they was 5.00 when i bought them i think i would of keep them. i went with the ecosmart 24.95 from Home DepotI have bad experience with the HD Ecosmart bulbs, They buzz, flicker, and takes a long time to reach brightness. I also have the Costco one (Feit) and those don't buzz and flicker. It also takes awhile o brighten up but I can deal with that given they are less than a buck each when I bought them.

I just got in on this deal in Long Island tonight- the BR40's rang up $19.99 with a $10 LIPA rebate so they ended up being $9.99 a pop (tax on $19.99). Wife couldn't understand why I replaced 20 or so perfectly good CFL's and I really had no explanation. They also had Par38 outdoor rated bulbs (90 watt equivalent for $23.69 - $10 rebate.. picked up two of those for a motion sensor outside) FYI- the BR30's throw out a great light and the BR40's are nice and bright. They look just like the 120 watt equivalent CFL's I that I replaced even though these LED's are labeled 100 watt equivalent.

Edit: anyone know if you can use these in a sealed shower trim? They are labeled damp-safe but not sure if they need a vent.

I kind of agree. My Sam's Club here in Maine has an 8 pack of GE Spiral CFL's 11 Watt (60 watt equivalent) for .94 Cents for the entire 8 pack. At that price you really can't go wrong.

ErikKur

Someone asked why buy LEDs instead of CFLs.
Here's why:

http://ezinearticles.com/?Fluorescent-Lighting-Dangers---Why-LED-Lights-Are-the-Better-Choice&id=3580556

Fluorescent Lighting Dangers Ė Why LED Lights Are the Better Choice


Compact Fluorescent Lights (CFLs) along with more traditional fluorescent lamps are now being aggressively marketed as environmentally friendly due to their reduced electricity consumption. Indeed, widespread replacement of incandescent bulbs with CFLs will greatly reduce electricity demand; however, there are safety issues that ultimately contribute to making LED lighting the superior choice. Understanding fluorescent lighting risks can help ensure that fluorescent light bulbs are used and disposed of safely while explaining why LED lighting is the safest and most eco-friendly lighting choice in the long run.
Mercury
The most commonly cited fluorescent lighting hazard is mercury. Fluorescent and CFL bulbs contain a small amount of mercury and are identified with the elemental symbol Hg. When these bulbs are cold, some of the mercury in the lamp is in liquid form, but while the lamp is operating or when the lamp is hot, most of the mercury is in a gaseous or vapor form.
Mercury vapor is extremely toxic. Even in liquid form, contact with mercury is considered life-threatening or a severe risk to health. Even very small doses of mercury can cause severe respiratory tract damage, brain damage, kidney damage, central nervous system damage, and many other serious medical conditions.
CFLs average less than 4 milligrams of mercury, about the amount that would cover the tip of a ballpoint pen. By comparison, older thermometers contain about 500 milligrams, an amount equal to the mercury in 125 or more CFLs. Although the amount of mercury in each fluorescent lamp is small, it is always important to avoid breaking fluorescent lamps, and used bulbs must be delivered to a hazardous waste handler. Never place fluorescent lamps in trash compactors or incinerators, since this will release the mercury and contaminate the surrounding area.
Disposed of improperly, mercury can contaminate buildings, landfills, lakes, animals, fish, birds, humans, crops and rivers. In the US, the EPA has ordered waste handlers to treat fluorescent lamps as hazardous waste. With such a classification, fluorescent lamps are not to be sent to landfills, but instead are to be sent to recycling centers that break the lamps under special conditions and safely recover the mercury. Up to 95 percent of the mercury contained in CFLs can be recovered if the bulbs are recycled properly.
Mercury-containing lamps generated by households and small businesses are not always subject to legal restrictions regarding their disposal. State laws vary and some states, such as California, Maine, New Hampshire, Minnesota, Vermont and Massachusetts, prohibit all mercury-containing lamps, including CFLs, from being discarded in the solid waste stream. In addition, many local ordinances require recycling of mercury-containing products, including lighting. It is best to check with your municipality to understand whether there are local requirements addressing mercury-containing waste disposal.
Because mercury will be released if a fluorescent lamp is broken, it is important to install fixtures in areas where the lamps are not likely to be broken. Fixtures in areas close to the ground or in areas with moving equipment should use metal or plastic shields to protect the lamp from being broken. If a fluorescent lamp breaks, there are numerous safety and cleanup issues which we discuss in more detail in the following section.
Breakage
Fluorescent lamps create several hazards if broken. Depending on the type, there may be a partial vacuum or the lamp may be under pressure. Breaking the glass can cause shrapnel injuries, along with the release of mercury and other hazardous compounds.
The biggest immediate injury threat from a broken lamp is from the phosphor-coated glass. If cut with fluorescent lamp glass, any phosphor that gets into the wound is likely to prevent blood clotting and will interfere with healing. Such injuries should be treated seriously and immediate medical attention should be obtained for people or pets that are cut. Medical personnel should be informed that the injuries were caused by a broken fluorescent lamp, and that mercury was present.
To minimize exposure to mercury vapor, EPA and other experts advise a few precautions. Children and pets should stay away from the area, and windows should be opened for at least 15 minutes so that vapors may disperse. Cleanup can be done by hand using disposable materials. Use rubber disposable gloves and scoop up the materials with stiff paper or cardboard. Use sticky tape to pick up small pieces and powder, clean the area with a damp paper towel, and dispose of the materials in an outside trash can. Never use a vacuum because this will only disperse the mercury vapor and leave particles trapped inside the cleaner bag.
Dimmers
Never use a CFL with a dimmer in the circuit (unless it is specifically made to work with dimmers), even if the dimmer is set at the maximum setting. Doing so places you at risk of fire and at the very least will dramatically shorten the life of the lamp and the dimmer. Also most photocells, motion sensors and electric timers are not designed to work with a CFL. Check with the manufacturer for the use of a CFL for these types of fixtures.
To use a CFL on a dimmer switch, you must buy a bulb thatís specifically made to work with dimmers (check the package). GE makes a dimming compact fluorescent light bulb (called the Energy Smart Dimming Spiralsreg that is specially designed for use with dimming switches. I donít recommend using regular compact fluorescent bulbs with dimming switches, since this can shorten bulb life. Using a regular compact fluorescent bulb with a dimmer will also nullify the bulbís warranty.
Finally, if a CFL bulb buzzing when it is installed in a fixture that is controlled by a dimmer switch, this is an indication that you have the wrong type of CFL bulb installed.
Electrical
Any fluorescent fixture that uses lamps longer than 24 or that is used outdoors or in a damp, wet, or high-humidity location must have an electrical ground for the fixture and ballast. All rapid-start and instant-start fluorescent fixtures must have an electrical ground in order to operate properly. Fixtures with longer lamps operate at higher voltages, with some fixtures having starting voltages across the lamp as high as 950 VAC. Voltages at this level represent a strong shock hazard and improperly grounded fixtures or direct contact with electrical connectors or other wiring can result in severe injury or death.
When servicing fluorescent fixtures and lamps, electrical power to the entire fixture should be disconnected. This is not always practical in situations where a large number of fixtures are controlled from the same power control (such as in open office areas). In these cases, insulating gloves and a nonmetallic ladder should be used if the fixtures must be serviced when power is present. This advice also applies when retrofitting a fluorescent fixture to mount b LED/b tube lights.
Short-Wave Ultraviolet Light
A long-term hazard from fluorescent lighting is the shorter-wave ultraviolet (UV) light that escapes the lamp. No matter how well crafted, some short-wave ultraviolet light escapes from every fluorescent lamp made. Short-wave UV light is one of the damaging components of the suns rays that reach the surface of the Earth, which can directly damage organic tissue and trigger cancers. Short-wave UV light can also age or damage paper, fabrics and other materials.
Generally, fixtures with a plastic lens leak the smallest amount of UV light, mainly because most of the ultraviolet light gets absorbed in the plastic lens. Fluorescent lighting in museums, archival libraries and manufacturing clean room areas usually have UV-absorbing sheeting applied to the lamps or the fixture lens to eliminate all UV light. LED bulbs do not produce any UV light.
Flicker and Glare
Flicker and glare from fluorescent lights can also cause headaches and have been found to impact learning and ability to concentrate. Although humans cannot see fluorescent lights flicker, the sensory system in some individuals can somehow detect the flicker. Ever since fluorescent lighting was introduced in workplaces, there have been complaints about headaches, eye strain and general eye discomfort. These complaints have been associated with the light flicker from fluorescent lights. When compared to regular fluorescent lights with magnetic ballasts, the use of high frequency electronic ballasts fluorescent lights resulted in more than a 50% drop in complaints of eye strain and headaches. There tended to be fewer complaints of headaches among workers on higher floors compared to those closer to ground level; that is, workers exposed to more natural light experienced fewer health effects.
Long-term clinical studies that conclude fluorescent lighting in schools may be related to many academic and health problems. A 2006 study found that students in schools with natural light instead of fluorescent lighting had a 10% to 21% higher learning rate and higher test scores. Fluorescent lighting may trigger headaches, migraines and other physical symptoms. Many children have been mislabeled with learning disabilities, ADD/ADHD, reading problems and dyslexia all because of students having to work under fluorescent lights. With cool-white fluorescent lighting, some students demonstrated hyperactivity, fatigue, irritability, and attention deficits.
ppLamps operating on alternating current (AC) electric systems produce light flickering at a frequency of 120 Hertz (Hz, cycles per second), twice the power line frequency of 60 Hz (50 Hz in many countries outside North America). Essentially, the power is turning on and off 120 times a second (actually the voltage varies from +120 volts to -120 volts, 60 times or cycles a second and is at zero volts twice in one cycle). People cannot notice the flicker in fluorescent lights that have a flicker rate of 120 cycles per second (or 120 Hz).
Flicker is usually a potential problem only with lighting that require the use of ballasts, like fluorescent lights. Incandescent lights usually do not cause a flicker problem since the light filaments generally do not cool quickly enough (and make the light dimmer) during the off time as the voltage changes in the AC power line. New, energy-efficient electronic ballasts take the 60 Hz power and convert it to voltages at a much higher frequency. The resulting flicker frequency is so high that the human eye cannot detect any fluctuation in the light intensity Ė essentially flicker-free. An added benefit is that electronic ballasts produce less hum than that emitted by other kinds of ballasts.
Manufacturers and regulators have taken steps to eliminate this problem with LED lights. In the US, the new Energy Star criteria for integrated LED replacement lamps include a requirement for 150 Hz operation (now being challenged by manufacturers who cite studies that 120 Hz is sufficient). The majority of low-frequency AC LED systems already operate in the rectified mode, which effectively doubles the luminous modulation frequency to 120Hz for 60Hz mains in the US. Despite many attempts, laboratory investigations have not found statistically significant evidence of luminous modulation with frequencies over 100Hz on human performance, health, or comfort.
--------------------
NOTE:
If you feel you have to use them for some imagined CO2 issue, then at least avoid touching the glass tubing as it will crush in your hands very easily!†And inside of that glass tubing is a white dust! And that white dust is toxic! It not only contains Mercury and but a host of other toxic chemicals!†

And the Transformer on the bottom of the bulb also contains a highly toxic PCB Compond! Just look at the warnings on the package they come in. If you break one in your home! It will cost you about $2000. minimum to get it cleaned up!†

A regular Incandescent bulb contains steel and Tungsten, neither one of which is the least bit toxic.†

Cost wise, the CFL will cost you 5 times as much as the Incandescent bulb Yes it uses less ampeage but you have to buy a 100 Watt equivlant CFL to equal the light output of a 60 Watt Incandescent! And they will not work correctly with a dimmer switch, unless you buy the special ones that will cost you 2 times more again! Plus, they like temps below 32 degrees at all. People in cold climates use Incadescent bulbs to supply a small amount of heat to keep pipes from freezing etc. CFL'S will not work for that either.

How do these compare to the CREE LED bulbs at HomeDepot?

I love when reviews are counted with factorials.



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