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LinkWater heater
4 gallons per minute

Amazon
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Has anyone had any success with these types of heaters? I tried three different models with nearly disastrous (near fire) results. Were I not home when the incident occurred, I would not have a home.

izachpsk8 said:   LinkWater heater
4 gallons per minute



Not a hot deal since other sellers are pretty close to this price. The "used" Amazon ones at $176 isn't a bad price though.

I have one of these (not this particular brand) in a garage apartment half-bath that had only cold water run to it. It works fine. Will put out a stream of warm/hot water endlessly. It has been there and working for over 10 years.

I have had a tankless heater for my entire house for 8 years and they work great.

This is an electric model, and at only 13kW, it will have limited use. To raise water temp, 1kW of power will raise 1GPM by 7 degrees. At 4GPM, this unit can only raise the temperature of the incoming water by 23F (7deg-gpm/kW x 13kW / 4GPM = 23). For most of us with groundwater temps around 55-60, that means pretty tepid water. For a 1.5GPM shower, you've got about a 60F temp rise, which should be enough for most areas (you'll lose 5-10F between piping losses and loss at the showerhead).

Here's some info: http://www.eemaxinc.com/assets/files/sizingguide.pdf

I have two EEmax units under my kitchen sink. The first one raises the HW temp to 130+/- F and means that I have hot water at the tap instantly, instead of after 40-50 seconds of waiting. The second one is attached to a dedicated faucet, and is a "sanitary" model which I've set to maximize the temp coming out of the faucet to be ~0.8-1 GPM at 190F. It's like the instant hot faucets, but big enough to fill a stock pot with nearly boiling water in a couple of minutes - faster than any stove. It works on the cup level too, of course (though it does actually take ~30-40 secs to get HOT if the pipes are all cold - it still has its limits).

vadeltachi said:   Has anyone had any success with these types of heaters? I tried three different models with nearly disastrous (near fire) results. Were I not home when the incident occurred, I would not have a home.

I installed a Stiebel Eltron TEMPRA-24 a couple years ago and love it. I did have to install two 60 amp 240 VAC circuits with 6 gauge wire. I also have 200 Amp service. If you are using too small a gauge of wire for the amount of current the unit draws, it will burn and melt the wires.

This supplies my entire house. Previously the shower would run out of hot water and you couldn't do dishes and run a shower at the same time or the water got cold fats. Now unlimited supply of hot water.

Lvscott said:   vadeltachi said:   Has anyone had any success with these types of heaters? I tried three different models with nearly disastrous (near fire) results. Were I not home when the incident occurred, I would not have a home.

I installed a Stiebel Eltron TEMPRA-24 a couple years ago and love it. I did have to install two 60 amp 240 VAC circuits with 6 gauge wire. I also have 200 Amp service. If you are using too small a gauge of wire for the amount of current the unit draws, it will burn and melt the wires.

This supplies my entire house. Previously the shower would run out of hot water and you couldn't do dishes and run a shower at the same time or the water got cold fats. Now unlimited supply of hot water.
Thank you. I, too, upgraded wiring, and have 400-Amp service at my house, so that was not the issue. Apparently what happened was a combination of corrosion of the tanks surrounding the heating elements and a failure of the flow switch. This allowed the heaters to stay on with no flow, and since the device was installed without any pressure relief devices (within the applicable code, no less), it essentially exploded and shorted out the wiring and caused a major leak. I have also heard that the heating elements themselves have to be replaced fairly often -- annually is what the vendor remarked. I like the concept, and it's certainly a space saver compared to a 80-gallon tank. I hope that the technology is better than what I tired a few years ago. (We are back to the 80-gallon tank and will consider a tank-less or heat-pump water heater next time a replacement is ordered. Our property requires water heaters to be replaced every four years as a flood-prevention measure).

Remember if there is a weather emergency and you water is shut off, you always have the hot water heater to use for water.
With this unit, you are out of luck.
This is especially valuable, in Fl, La, Ca.....



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