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nanga said:   Thanks, but I can't convince myself buying approx $90 worth accessories for $300 generator......any cheaper option?



long, low gage wire power cords are relatively expensive.

carbon monoxide poisoning, more so.

30 amps of electricity + CO doesn't leave much room for creativity and almost none for error.

there is a link in this thread to a 25ft green l5-30 to 3 3 prong cable on eBay for ~30 bucks shipped if you offer the seller 15 for it

Look for this on eBay: 25 ft 10/3 Generator Power Cord with L5-30P Plug and (3) Lighted 5-15R ( ht stoploss)

I purchased this a while ago and ran it through Sandy power outage. I am very happy with it. However I have trouble changing oil. I removed the screw under the yellow oil filler cap, but nothing came out. The instruction in the manual is very vague. I am wondering if anyone can help me. Tks

Are you trying to change the oil when the unit's hot? Cold, viscous oil might not want to come out of the drain hole because it's too thick.

mravk said:   I purchased this a while ago and ran it through Sandy power outage. I am very happy with it. However I have trouble changing oil. I removed the screw under the yellow oil filler cap, but nothing came out. The instruction in the manual is very vague. I am wondering if anyone can help me. Tksyou removed the wrong bolt. it's the one to the left of the yellow filler cap. look at this youtube video starting at 1:30 or so: how to store your champion generator.

the video is for a different generator but should be similar enough.

dup

I received my generator the day before the $20 off $150 coupon went out. I did an online chat this AM and asked if it could be applied to my order (paid with Cabela's Visa). She told me no, that my order was before the $20 rebate period. When I pressed a bit more, she did offer me a $20 gift card that could be used on a future order. I gladly accepted. It will be mailed to my home.

dup

momoman said:   mravk said:   I purchased this a while ago and ran it through Sandy power outage. I am very happy with it. However I have trouble changing oil. I removed the screw under the yellow oil filler cap, but nothing came out. The instruction in the manual is very vague. I am wondering if anyone can help me. Tksyou removed the wrong bolt. it's the one to the left of the yellow filler cap. look at this youtube video starting at 1:30 or so: how to store your champion generator.

the video is for a different generator but should be similar enough.


Interesting video. I'm curious if you're better off running the generator once a month (every 14 days according to manual) or going through this long-term storage procedure. Any opinions from veteran generator owners? (This is my first genny.)

Also, does anyone have experience running a high-efficency, natural gas furnace off a non-inverter generator? I've been reading up on it and am 95% sure it will work. My main concern is accidentally frying the funace computer boards. Would running it through a surge protector clean up the electric to the furnace?

Any insights would be greatly appreciated.

yerboyfloyd said:   momoman said:   mravk said:   I purchased this a while ago and ran it through Sandy power outage. I am very happy with it. However I have trouble changing oil. I removed the screw under the yellow oil filler cap, but nothing came out. The instruction in the manual is very vague. I am wondering if anyone can help me. Tksyou removed the wrong bolt. it's the one to the left of the yellow filler cap. look at this youtube video starting at 1:30 or so: how to store your champion generator.

the video is for a different generator but should be similar enough.


Interesting video. I'm curious if you're better off running the generator once a month (every 14 days according to manual) or going through this long-term storage procedure. Any opinions from veteran generator owners? (This is my first genny.)

Also, does anyone have experience running a high-efficency, natural gas furnace off a non-inverter generator? I've been reading up on it and am 95% sure it will work. My main concern is accidentally frying the funace computer boards. Would running it through a surge protector clean up the electric to the furnace?

Any insights would be greatly appreciated.



Note that my generator had a mfg date of Nov-2011. So it sat for year before the break in. Started just fine.

I do not mothball any of my small engines.

In no particular order

I always use fuel stabilizer in my small engine gas cans and use the fuel within 90 days. It helps address condensation issues and the fuel going stale. I start and run all of my engines every 60 days out of their season, more so in season, as it keeps the fuel line and carburetor from gumming up. It has worked out for the past 12 years. I haven't needed it, but you can keep a can of stater fluid around just in case. A blast of ether,or whatever pc substance used today, in the carb will get things moving. Ethanol in the gas creates issues for small engines. ( after one too many comments I sent a honda fanboy to the Honda service center to check it out) it isn' fatal, it just needs attention. if you can find ethanol free fuel it is a good idea to keep some around for generator use.

Just ordered one.. Now I probably won't lose power all winter, but at least I have some peace of mind...

Maybe,But I would rather have a non-chinese made generator like the ones sold by Harbor Freight than one of these, plus I choose to support products from our allys rather than China, The Predator generators are manufactured in South Africa and distributed by a company in southern Calif.Personally I'd rather see my hard earned bucks going into the pockets of an ally vs the Chinese,but to each their own, Either product does the same job, you'll have to decide who and what you really want to support.

Is there an adapter, that woudl allow you to hook this up to the natural gasline of the house.

stl717 said:   Just ordered one.. Now I probably won't lose power all winter, but at least I have some peace of mind...

When I bought a snow blower a few years ago we didn't have any real accumulation for the next three winters.

Received one yesterday. There were oil stains in the box. Is it normal? Where did you buy the twist lock plug and how do you use it?

Sold Out

The Deal is alive again.

cleek said:   The Deal is alive again.

But this is the last day for the $20 off.

Thank you for the heads up Momoman, i'm in the same boat with that C46540 from back then. It still in the box so your advice and links below are very important to me. Actually i just started building the extension cord to power few appliances if need be. I called Champion and was advised to use the TTR30 RV plug to maximize the output of this generator. Since i'm not an electrician I was wondering where can I find advice online on how to hook up two 15 amp outlet through a box to a 10 gauge cable out of the RV plug? I wonder how to setup the 3 wires 10 gauge cable to 2 15 amp outlets (pig tails?) so that I get 15 amp on each of them and then can plug a power strip to each to outlet to support light appliances like a tv and few lights during a black out.

In summary, i got the Male TTR30, 30 feet 10 gauge 3 wires cable, one receptacle, 2 15 amp outlet but not sure how it to hook everything up properly. Is there somewhere a diagram that can show how the wires should be plugged?


momoman said:   i've decided to test my brand new champion 3500w generator i bought 4 yrs ago ($150 AR deal) and.........it didn't work. i filled it with oil and new gasoline and pulled and pulled and pulled. i went to the champion website and they have a technical bulletin to troubleshoot the generator. i performed all the tests and my generator passed all the tests but still didn't fire up. i also disconnected the low oil sensor. it never fired even once so i suspected it might be a clog somewhere. i took the carburetor off the generator (easily done) and sprayed carburetor cleaner down the jet and then put everything back together and...........it fired up!

i had searched the 'net and apparently new generators that have been sitting unused sometimes have a varnish build up in the carburetor jet from the residual gasoline used to test fire the generator at the factory.

my advice is to keep a can of carburetor cleaner around and learn how to troubleshoot your generator.

here are some links that helped me:

champion troubleshooting bulletin
champion faqs
champion carburetor tear down instructions

it really wasn't that difficult to pull the carburetor off and squirt the cleaner down the jet. i didn't need to use compressed air to clear the jet. the cleaner quickly dissolved whatever it was that was clogging the jet.

now that my generator works and is broken in i'm going to order the tri-fuel conversion kit so i can run it off propane that i can safely store long term. lots of doomsday survivalists and the RV crowd have had success with their champion generators running on propane.

Mawashi said:   Thank you for the heads up Momoman, i'm in the same boat with that C46540 from back then. It still in the box so your advice and links below are very important to me. Actually i just started building the extension cord to power few appliances if need be. I called Champion and was advised to use the TTR30 RV plug to maximize the output of this generator. Since i'm not an electrician I was wondering where can I find advice online on how to hook up two 15 amp outlet through a box to a 10 gauge cable out of the RV plug? I wonder how to setup the 3 wires 10 gauge cable to 2 15 amp outlets (pig tails?) so that I get 15 amp on each of them and then can plug a power strip to each to outlet to support light appliances like a tv and few lights during a black out.

In summary, i got the Male TTR30, 30 feet 10 gauge 3 wires cable, one receptacle, 2 15 amp outlet but not sure how it to hook everything up properly. Is there somewhere a diagram that can show how the wires should be plugged?
I built one of these for that very generator using a cable much like this. The connections would be the same as any electrical box that has two duplex outlets in it -- PM me if you want details. However, note that there is no way to limit either outlet to just 15A -- each will be able to draw up to the full 30A if you load it that high. That's "not good" for the outlets or the extension cords you'll be using. I used 20A outlets in mine and am just careful to balance the load between the two outlets and not overload any one extension cord.

If you want each outlet limited to 15A you'll need to use the 240V twistlock with each hot line connected to one outlet. Instead of trying to build a cord for this, just buy one, like this.

Thank you Comprx, seems that i need to get 20 amps outlet then, i'll pm you to validate, thanks!

comprx said:   Mawashi said:   Thank you for the heads up Momoman, i'm in the same boat with that C46540 from back then. It still in the box so your advice and links below are very important to me. Actually i just started building the extension cord to power few appliances if need be. I called Champion and was advised to use the TTR30 RV plug to maximize the output of this generator. Since i'm not an electrician I was wondering where can I find advice online on how to hook up two 15 amp outlet through a box to a 10 gauge cable out of the RV plug? I wonder how to setup the 3 wires 10 gauge cable to 2 15 amp outlets (pig tails?) so that I get 15 amp on each of them and then can plug a power strip to each to outlet to support light appliances like a tv and few lights during a black out.

In summary, i got the Male TTR30, 30 feet 10 gauge 3 wires cable, one receptacle, 2 15 amp outlet but not sure how it to hook everything up properly. Is there somewhere a diagram that can show how the wires should be plugged?
I built one of these for that very generator using a cable much like this. The connections would be the same as any electrical box that has two duplex outlets in it -- PM me if you want details. However, note that there is no way to limit either outlet to just 15A -- each will be able to draw up to the full 30A if you load it that high. That's "not good" for the outlets or the extension cords you'll be using. I used 20A outlets in mine and am just careful to balance the load between the two outlets and not overload any one extension cord.

If you want each outlet limited to 15A you'll need to use the 240V twistlock with each hot line connected to one outlet. Instead of trying to build a cord for this, just buy one, like this.

how to best wire this for a residential use during power outage situations
I was thinking of drawing a line from main panel to garage and have an "outlet" there to plug in from a male-male extension cord.

Good deal.
HurricaneDeals.com put some new generators up this week.
The Cabelas deal is a good one.

Thank you OP. I just got one.

Check your order if you have not received the generator yet. They never emailed me and canceled the order

Amby said:   how to best wire this for a residential use during power outage situations
I was thinking of drawing a line from main panel to garage and have an "outlet" there to plug in from a male-male extension cord.


Excellent way to kill yourself or someone else. Look into a transfer switch.

And don't need to bother looking for a Transfer Switch at HD, afaik they don't carry those anymore. A while back, this is the one i was looking at.I'm still trying to figure out how to connect my TTR30 to an outlet so i wouldn't dare trying to install one of these on my own

If you live near Cabelas store, you can get it today (11/23) for $279.99 with free cover.
I purchased a C46540 in 2007 and the generator been sitting in the garage untouched since March 2009. I ran until the generator out of gas then turn gas line and front switches to OFF position. It start just fine this week. If you don't want changing oil often, go with high quality synthetic oil.

Can I use this oil found here for this generator? Is it ok to keep it on the shelf for long time as we need only 0.6 qt oil one time?

Got my answer - no.

nanga said:   Can I use this oil found here for this generator? Is it ok to keep it on the shelf for long time as we need only 0.6 qt oil one time?

Got my answer - no.


Just buy a jug of inexpensive 10-30. Add oil, run for break in period. Change it again. And when you use it during an outage, check the level when you refuel. Add as required. And change it after extended use. The left over oil will be fine on the shelf for several years.

Now $309 with free shipping code: 2GIFTS

40 bucks for a 75ft cable and 2ft three outlet fan out cable combo

http://www.fatwallet.com/forums/hot-deals/1238818/m17364615/#m17...

I am amazed that nobody has addressed this, or perhaps I did not see any response?

If you want to power electronic devices from a generator, you are best to have an Inverter generator. Inverter generators use AC to AC inverters, which provide a near pure sine wave of consistent amplitude and frequency.

Inverter generators use electronic speed controls to maintain a regulated output.

Inexpensive generators, like this one, produce a sine wave, but of varying amplitude and frequency, based upon the load applied to the generator.

In a no load condition, the engine turns the generator at 3600 rpm, this equates to 60 hz. The same as house current. When a load is applied to the generator, the engine slows down, the centrifugal governor senses this slow-down and increases the throttle on the engine. This increases the engine speed for a moment and in doing so, increases the frequency to perhaps 70Hz and similarly increases the amplitude or voltage out. After the moment, the governor responds by lowering the speed back to 3600 rpm. If not properly tuned, the governor might overshoot and go low again. If there is no dampening of either the load at the generator terminals, or in the centrifugal governor, the engine speed will oscillate. That is, the speed will go high-low-high-low, etc. Only when there is a high current load on the generator, does the oscillation flatten and the speed become a steady state 3600 rpm.

Additionally there is very little filtering of the power producing circuits and little isolation from the engine ignition circuits. So, the power that is provided at the terminals is dirty from an electronics viewpoint.

People who suggested an APC brand power conditioner/UPS are headed in the right direction, but there is no guarantee that your electronics will survive. A good power conditioner will probably cost just as much as the generator.

Lets say you want to power a your refrigerator, some lights, and your computer from this generator. Lets also say that they are all operating at a steady state. Then, the refrigerator shuts down because its cold enough inside, this drop in load will cause the generator to speed up and increase the output voltage. This transition will be for just a second or two for the governor to compensate, but what is happening to your computer's power supply? An hour later, the refrigerator kicks back on. The starting load on the refrigerator compressor is such that the generator speed might momentarily drop to around 2200 to 2500 rpm. That's 37 to 42 Hz. Similarly, the voltage might drop to around 90 vac. Will your computer shutoff?

Also, with the refrigerator going on and off, voltage spikes are being produced, how will the computer tolerate that?

So lets say that your computer handled this little event unscathed. Can it tolerate it repeatedly for the many hours or days that you will be without power?

osuuma said:   I am amazed that nobody has addressed this, or perhaps I did not see any response?

If you want to power electronic devices from a generator, you are best to have an Inverter generator. Inverter generators use AC to AC inverters, which provide a near pure sine wave of consistent amplitude and frequency.

Inverter generators use electronic speed controls to maintain a regulated output.

Inexpensive generators, like this one, produce a sine wave, but of varying amplitude and frequency, based upon the load applied to the generator.

In a no load condition, the engine turns the generator at 3600 rpm, this equates to 60 hz. The same as house current. When a load is applied to the generator, the engine slows down, the centrifugal governor senses this slow-down and increases the throttle on the engine. This increases the engine speed for a moment and in doing so, increases the frequency to perhaps 70Hz and similarly increases the amplitude or voltage out. After the moment, the governor responds by lowering the speed back to 3600 rpm. If not properly tuned, the governor might overshoot and go low again. If there is no dampening of either the load at the generator terminals, or in the centrifugal governor, the engine speed will oscillate. That is, the speed will go high-low-high-low, etc. Only when there is a high current load on the generator, does the oscillation flatten and the speed become a steady state 3600 rpm.

Additionally there is very little filtering of the power producing circuits and little isolation from the engine ignition circuits. So, the power that is provided at the terminals is dirty from an electronics viewpoint.

People who suggested an APC brand power conditioner/UPS are headed in the right direction, but there is no guarantee that your electronics will survive. A good power conditioner will probably cost just as much as the generator.

Lets say you want to power a your refrigerator, some lights, and your computer from this generator. Lets also say that they are all operating at a steady state. Then, the refrigerator shuts down because its cold enough inside, this drop in load will cause the generator to speed up and increase the output voltage. This transition will be for just a second or two for the governor to compensate, but what is happening to your computer's power supply? An hour later, the refrigerator kicks back on. The starting load on the refrigerator compressor is such that the generator speed might momentarily drop to around 2200 to 2500 rpm. That's 37 to 42 Hz. Similarly, the voltage might drop to around 90 vac. Will your computer shutoff?

Also, with the refrigerator going on and off, voltage spikes are being produced, how will the computer tolerate that?

So lets say that your computer handled this little event unscathed. Can it tolerate it repeatedly for the many hours or days that you will be without power?


All good points.

Inverter models are certainly preferable, but are many, many times the price. It is probably cheaper to buy several new TVs and computers .

The sensitive devices don't need to have the power "conditioned" as much as protected from severe under/over voltage. Neither a serviceable AVR nor UPS need to cost nearly as much as a generator. I do have my TV and/or desktop machine on one anyway. Household power isn't that grand, especially in the summer months. FWIW, My laptops (which have a variable power supply) have been frequently attached to all sort of dodgy power and are just fine.

You may want to actually put a meter on the output to how dramatic the voltage drop turns out to be. I couldn't get mine to drop below 110 with ~1100w swings. I did get to 108 a couple of times at at a little over ~1400w swings.

osuuma said:   I am amazed that nobody has addressed this, or perhaps I did not see any response?

If you want to power electronic devices from a generator, you are best to have an Inverter generator. Inverter generators use AC to AC inverters, which provide a near pure sine wave of consistent amplitude and frequency.

Inverter generators use electronic speed controls to maintain a regulated output.

Inexpensive generators, like this one, produce a sine wave, but of varying amplitude and frequency, based upon the load applied to the generator.

In a no load condition, the engine turns the generator at 3600 rpm, this equates to 60 hz. The same as house current. When a load is applied to the generator, the engine slows down, the centrifugal governor senses this slow-down and increases the throttle on the engine. This increases the engine speed for a moment and in doing so, increases the frequency to perhaps 70Hz and similarly increases the amplitude or voltage out. After the moment, the governor responds by lowering the speed back to 3600 rpm. If not properly tuned, the governor might overshoot and go low again. If there is no dampening of either the load at the generator terminals, or in the centrifugal governor, the engine speed will oscillate. That is, the speed will go high-low-high-low, etc. Only when there is a high current load on the generator, does the oscillation flatten and the speed become a steady state 3600 rpm.

Additionally there is very little filtering of the power producing circuits and little isolation from the engine ignition circuits. So, the power that is provided at the terminals is dirty from an electronics viewpoint.

People who suggested an APC brand power conditioner/UPS are headed in the right direction, but there is no guarantee that your electronics will survive. A good power conditioner will probably cost just as much as the generator.

Lets say you want to power a your refrigerator, some lights, and your computer from this generator. Lets also say that they are all operating at a steady state. Then, the refrigerator shuts down because its cold enough inside, this drop in load will cause the generator to speed up and increase the output voltage. This transition will be for just a second or two for the governor to compensate, but what is happening to your computer's power supply? An hour later, the refrigerator kicks back on. The starting load on the refrigerator compressor is such that the generator speed might momentarily drop to around 2200 to 2500 rpm. That's 37 to 42 Hz. Similarly, the voltage might drop to around 90 vac. Will your computer shutoff?

Also, with the refrigerator going on and off, voltage spikes are being produced, how will the computer tolerate that?

So lets say that your computer handled this little event unscathed. Can it tolerate it repeatedly for the many hours or days that you will be without power?


Great "lab" case...however regular power has brown outs and all sorts of flickering. A lot of people would rather take their chances and not have their food spoil than saving up for a $1k plus gen set. The reality is, these generators when running well, pose zero problems to electronics.

For my parent's I setup two UPS devices, one for their Cable modem, router, and laptop charger; the other is setup to their desktop, monitor and printer. So during Sandy, they just could just hook up the one UPS with the modem/router to the generator and still have internet while the power was out. Also, no real risk of damaging electronics since it has a built in line conditioner.

breaux124 said:   For my parent's I setup two UPS devices, one for their Cable modem, router, and laptop charger; the other is setup to their desktop, monitor and printer. So during Sandy, they just could just hook up the one UPS with the modem/router to the generator and still have internet while the power was out. Also, no real risk of damaging electronics since it has a built in line conditioner.

You're a good kid.

"The reality is, these generators when running well, pose zero problems to electronics" Completely incorrect, but don't trust me,contact your insurer and ask them how many times they reject claims made on electronics due to surges or drops in power made by these small generators that folks use thinkin they can run stuff they are not designed to run, then get back to me about how wrong he is about his info. I finally bought my new unit after getting the Harbor Freight unit for camping(another nice camping unit for $289),A nice 10kw Generac unit designed to power a house and all inside it properly wired in by a certified electrician on a 10 circuit panel not some small rinky dink campsite wonder like these. Go ahead blow up your modem's,TV's, computers and then try to get your insurer to cover them. I'm not about to get screwed because of someone else's lack of knowledge on these type of units, great for campers and the like and maybe a standby unit for a fridge or heater and a light or 2 but thats it, my electronics cost too much to get shorted out by wrong info.

Hey Buster2, how many champion units do you own? I have two (1400 and a 3500) and a Honda EU2000i. No broken anything with any of the three.

I think you should ditch that turd Generac and get a Toshiba 4S. You'll thank me later. K... bye.



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