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What keeps people from being dishonest during a weigh-in? I've gained ~5lbs over the last few months, but I can be anywhere from 145-150lb depending on how much I ate and the time of day.

Interestingly, they have a clause in their terms and conditions that if you are unhappy with this program after you participated in it, or if you were disqualified, etc., you can't say ANYthing for 2 years.

It's only been going for 2 years or less, I think, so only folks who were happy with their experience will be posting on FW and elsewhere about this program.... any who were unhappy will have to stay silent.


"Participant covenants and agrees that he/she will not say anything disparaging about HealthyWage via any means, including electronic media (including but not limited to email, Twitter and Facebook), written media (including but not limited to letters, press and advertisements), and spoken word, for two years following the end of the challenge. This includes all disparaging remarks whether true or false. Participant understands that sour grapes can cause serious damage to HealthyWage and Participant hereby agrees to be financially responsible for such damages and to pay any and all legal costs and fees, including attorneys fees, that HealthyWage incurs in any successful action against the Participant for violating this clause, even if HealthyWage's damages are small. Participant agrees that the word “disparagement,” as used in this section, shall be construed very broadly."

source: http://www.healthywage.com/ten-percent-rules

If you read the whole section including the beginning it doesn't sound as bad as you make it out to be by posting just the part you did..

V. Sour Grapes Clause
Note to participants: We wanted to explain the Sour Grapes Clause. We rarely disqualify participants, and it has happened for only two reasons: (1) fraud/cheating/unfair conduct and (2) very rarely, for not submitting weigh-ins. We sometimes find ourselves threatened by folks who have cheated. They sometimes say things like, "pay me or I will cause a social media raucous." The Sour Grapes Clause is designed to prevent that. We do not and will not use the Sour Grapes Clause for any other purpose. Please do not take offense to it---it does not and will not apply to 99% of our participants. We view you as an important customer; we take our relationship with you very seriously; and we value your patronage.


NantucketSunrise said:   Interestingly, they have a clause in their terms and conditions that if you are unhappy with this program after you participated in it, or if you were disqualified, etc., you can't say ANYthing for 2 years.

It's only been going for 2 years or less, I think, so only folks who were happy with their experience will be posting on FW and elsewhere about this program.... any who were unhappy will have to stay silent.


"Participant covenants and agrees that he/she will not say anything disparaging about HealthyWage via any means, including electronic media (including but not limited to email, Twitter and Facebook), written media (including but not limited to letters, press and advertisements), and spoken word, for two years following the end of the challenge. This includes all disparaging remarks whether true or false. Participant understands that sour grapes can cause serious damage to HealthyWage and Participant hereby agrees to be financially responsible for such damages and to pay any and all legal costs and fees, including attorneys fees, that HealthyWage incurs in any successful action against the Participant for violating this clause, even if HealthyWage's damages are small. Participant agrees that the word “disparagement,” as used in this section, shall be construed very broadly."

source: http://www.healthywage.com/ten-percent-rules

Done. Signed up for the BMI challenge and the 10%. I should be able to do the 10% twice. That would be $600 in, $1,600 back. My registration number is 7620157237.

cme4oil said:   If you read the whole section including the beginning it doesn't sound as bad as you make it out to be by posting just the part you did..


I did not do anything to "make it out" to sound bad. I quoted a whole passage verbatim from their terms and conditions.

They make it very clear in the terms and conditions that they MEAN what they say in that passage. If that passage I quoted sounds harsh to you, it's not due to anything that *I* did or didn't do.

When someone says, "I'm only hitting you/firing you/leaving you out/silencing you/taking away your rights because I honestly care about you but I just know what's best for everyone" (or whatever), the reasons given do not neutralize the action or make it okay....

I'm a proponent of free speech, so I find their draconian measures to stop participants from expressing their honest and even "true" opinions of the service concerning.

This company is just offering a random service - you are just signing up to make a bet with yourself that you can lose weight -- it's not like you are signing up to be a spy for the CIA.

dougtaylor1 said:   Done. Signed up for the BMI challenge and the 10%. I should be able to do the 10% twice. That would be $600 in, $1,600 back. My registration number is 7620157237.

I'm so pleased for you! Good luck!

kdn102 said:   

Aren't 60% of all adult american's overweight? It's getting closer to 70%, holy hell! And 35% of adults are obese.

So, then, this would apply to 60% of adults:
"put up $100 and get $200 if you lose 10 percent of your starting weight in six months"

Plus the BMI challenge for free would also apply to them.

(Un?)fortunately for me I am at the tail end of losing 80 over the past 5 years. I should have procrastinated more


I don't understand what you are meaning to say. I did not say it would not apply to the majority of U.S. Americans (fat). Those that are fat. I said it would not apply to healthy people. Healthy. You know, people that have gym memberships and actually use it, et. cetera. I am glad that it can be used by people who are fat (although the GREAT majority will not) but what about a legitimate deal for people who are not fat? Why reward people just for being unhealthy?

darrcook said:   
Nice little pejorative there. Why not go on and decree the uselessness of Unemployment Insurance for those that are employed, or heck, the uselessness of aspirin for those that don't have a headache.

Good for you for being the picture of health. Bonus points for the elite smugness.

You must have some family/acquaintences that are heavy. Do you openly make the Wall-E comparison to their faces?


I am an amateur athlete. If I had family that were fat, why would I not tell them to their faces that they were fat? Do I seem like someone that minces words? People who are fat need to stop blaming everyone but their own fat selves. Thanks for the bonus (faux) points.

MISTERCHEAP said:   DeltaSigChi4 said:   Great. Except completely useless for those of us that are not on the threshold of death due to our inability to eat healthily and actually not be completely sedentary ala the humans in Wall-E. - E


I wonder if they offer this challenge for STUPID people?


Why? Are you trying to get a double threat prize?

Caryite said:   
burkotron5k said:   Too bad this won't work out for healthy people. How about a bonus for adding muscle??
Depends. I know a healthy person that signed up and is committed to losing 10%. Depends on your motivation, but yes, not for everyone, but not as limiting as some might think either.


They were not the epitome of health if they could lose 10%. Not possible for someone that is really in top shape. Not possible, unless one does water manipulation. Which makes me wonder if that is the only way for a healthy individual to do this. In fact, I will do this, as an AMATEUR ATHLETE on a PRO TEAM, with a relatively low amount of body fat. - E

Someone above wrote: I know a healthy person that signed up and is committed to losing 10%.
Someone else responded: They were not the epitome of health if they could lose 10%. Not possible for someone that is really in top shape

(Sorry for the impersonal quick-quoting - I didn't want to futz around with the editing system by locating the relevant posts and quoting properly from them.)


People define "healthy" in many ways.

Most people do not say "a healthy person" whilst really meaning "a person at the epitome of health and really in top shape", i.e, the top 1% (or whatever tiny percentage) of the US population.

---
The BMI scale is one way that the medical profession defines a "healthy" weight, and there is such a wide range in the recommended BMI level for my height that, yes, I could lose 10% of my body weight and still have a BMI that is 18.5 or above (which is the recommended minimum). I could also gain 10% of my body weight and still have a BMI that is 24.9 or below (which is the recommended maximum).

BMI calculators are easy to find on the internet, but here's one if anyone reading this is curious about her/his own results: http://www.cdc.gov/healthyweight/assessing/bmi/adult_bmi/english...

---------
Although I am quite "a healthy person" (even if I do say so myself ), last night I was considering signing up with this company to do the challenge to lose 10% of my weight (I could only do their 10% challenge, not their BMI one, since my current BMI is in the "normal" category).

I was at that weight 2 years ago (my current weight minus 10%) and a sub-section of my wardrobe misses it!

But as per my above posting from last night, I read the Healthywage terms and conditions closely, and I wasn't too happy with the ban on saying anything negative about the process for 2 years.

Since there is no way for a potential customer of that company to know the various problems that were encounted by previous customers who didn't have a good experience with the program, I am wary of getting myself into something when I am only allowed to know the positive side of the picture.

I don't buy a laptop without reading a heck of a lot of customer reviews, I don't book a vacation hotel without researching customer reviews extensively, frankly I don't even buy a new stapler without doing an exhaustive comparison and I will not hand $150 over to a relatively new organization and trust it to treat me well and do exactly what it promises if it has imposed a strict gagging clause on all its former customers.

So... then of course the little angel on my right shoulder whispered that I could do the challenge anyway, that I don't have to pay an external company money to do it (plus go through that company's rigamorole and exacting instructions about every little thing for a very long 6 months), that I can just set myself a lovely goal and work towards it on my own like a good girl and take satisfaction in the achievement without being motivated by a cool extra $150 coming around in July.

I couldn't make out exactly what the little dude on my left shoulder responded to that with, because he was grabbing his sides and guffawing, plus he was busy downing a big piece of chocolate birthday cake that I made for a relative yesterday....

You are the OP. Just do it!

NantucketSunrise said:    Someone above wrote: I know a healthy person that signed up and is committed to losing 10%.
Someone else responded: They were not the epitome of health if they could lose 10%. Not possible for someone that is really in top shape

(Sorry for the impersonal quick-quoting - I didn't want to futz around with the editing system by locating the relevant posts and quoting properly from them.)


People define "healthy" in many ways.

Most people do not say "a healthy person" whilst really meaning "a person at the epitome of health and really in top shape", i.e, the top 1% (or whatever tiny percentage) of the US population.

---
The BMI scale is one way that the medical profession defines a "healthy" weight, and there is such a wide range in the recommended BMI level for my height that, yes, I could lose 10% of my body weight and still have a BMI that is 18.5 or above (which is the recommended minimum). I could also gain 10% of my body weight and still have a BMI that is 24.9 or below (which is the recommended maximum).

BMI calculators are easy to find on the internet, but here's one if anyone reading this is curious about her/his own results: http://www.cdc.gov/healthyweight/assessing/bmi/adult_bmi/english...

---------
Although I am quite "a healthy person" (even if I do say so myself ), last night I was considering signing up with this company to do the challenge to lose 10% of my weight (I could only do their 10% challenge, not their BMI one, since my current BMI is in the "normal" category).

I was at that weight 2 years ago (my current weight minus 10%) and a sub-section of my wardrobe misses it!

But as per my above posting from last night, I read the Healthywage terms and conditions closely, and I wasn't too happy with the ban on saying anything negative about the process for 2 years.

Since there is no way for a potential customer of that company to know the various problems that were encounted by previous customers who didn't have a good experience with the program, I am wary of getting myself into something when I am only allowed to know the positive side of the picture.

I don't buy a laptop without reading a heck of a lot of customer reviews, I don't book a vacation hotel without researching customer reviews extensively, frankly I don't even buy a new stapler without doing an exhaustive comparison and I will not hand $150 over to a relatively new organization and trust it to treat me well and do exactly what it promises if it has imposed a strict gagging clause on all its former customers.

So... then of course the little angel on my right shoulder whispered that I could do the challenge anyway, that I don't have to pay an external company money to do it (plus go through that company's rigamorole and exacting instructions about every little thing for a very long 6 months), that I can just set myself a lovely goal and work towards it on my own like a good girl and take satisfaction in the achievement without being motivated by a cool extra $150 coming around in July.

I couldn't make out exactly what the little dude on my left shoulder responded to that with, because he was grabbing his sides and guffawing, plus he was busy downing a big piece of chocolate birthday cake that I made for a relative yesterday....

dougtaylor1 said:   Done. Signed up for the BMI challenge and the 10%. I should be able to do the 10% twice. That would be $600 in, $1,600 back. My registration number is 7620157237.

The video weigh in was easy to do with my wife running the camera. You can do you own weigh out the same way. No need to go to a gym. Only problem is you have to buy a paper if you know where they sell them anymore. I called ten freinds in the neighborhood and asked to borrow a paper. Not one of them gets the paper anymore.

dougtaylor1 said:   dougtaylor1 said:   Done. Signed up for the BMI challenge and the 10%. I should be able to do the 10% twice. That would be $600 in, $1,600 back. My registration number is 7620157237.

The video weigh in was easy to do with my wife running the camera. You can do you own weigh out the same way. No need to go to a gym. Only problem is you have to buy a paper if you know where they sell them anymore. I called ten freinds in the neighborhood and asked to borrow a paper. Not one of them gets the paper anymore.


What PAPER ? Am I missing something here.

Who cares if something was featured in Time, CNN, NY Times, etc..... so was Bernie Madoff.

Hmm...wonder how this would work with being pregnant. Baby weight is sure to fall off quickly (for most women) so might be easy money for those having a baby this year.

roxygirlie1021 said:   Hmm...wonder how this would work with being pregnant. Baby weight is sure to fall off quickly (for most women) so might be easy money for those having a baby this year.

You can not be pregnant.

MysteriousGirl said:   What PAPER ? Am I missing something here.

He was talking about finding a newspaper that had that day's date on it. Showing a newspaper from that day in your weight-measurement video is the proof the company needs to see on your weighing-in video to prove that you weighed in on the exact day that you claimed you did.

I hope things have started out positively for the folks who decided to sign up for this program.

For reasons I described above, I decided not to sign up for it.

However, I did decide to lose a little weight, to be back to the weight that I feel most happy and comfortable with (and more of my clothes fit me then too! )

This weight target was 6.5% less than what my reading was on my home scale in early January.

Pound-wise, it wasn't too many pounds, because my BMI was in the "normal" category anyway (although the normal category is pretty broad).

But I just wanted to say that I weighed myself today and I'm down 2.7% from my early January reading, which I'm happy about. Maybe about a third of the way there. My clothes are feeling a bit looser.

Good luck to all those who do want to lose a little this year!


===
I noticed this Yahoo news story on my homepage this morning and it provides some food for thought (...groan, sorry for bad pun!):


Doctors Attack Pervasive Obesity Myths

By Christopher Wanjek, LiveScience.com

http://news.yahoo.com/doctors-attack-pervasive-obesity-myths-172...

Many weight-loss and obesity-prevention beliefs thought to be gospel truth are actually false or yet unproven, according to a study published in the Jan. 31 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Some of these false assumptions might even surprise medical doctors: Breast-feeding protects a child against obesity… Physical education in schools prevents childhood obesity… Gradual weight loss is better than rapid loss… You burn hundreds of calories during sex... These are just some of the obesity myths identified by an international team of doctors led by David Allison at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

These so-called facts are pervasive on websites, in the news media, and even in the scientific literature despite contradicting scientific evidence, the researchers said. The team identified a total of seven myths, six additional presumptions not yet proven true or false, and nine evidence-supported facts that are relevant for sound public health policy.

Myth 1: Small changes in energy intake or expenditure will produce large, long-term weight changes. This seemingly logical belief is based on a rule that a loss or gain of one pound comes from expending or consuming 3,500 calories. The problem is that this applies only to the short term. Additional pounds are harder and harder to shed once you begin losing weight. That's because, in part, as you lose weight your body has lower energy requirements, meaning it can maintain its weight (without any loss) on a lower calorie count. [7 Diet Tricks That Really Work]

Myth 2: Setting realistic goals in obesity treatment is important because otherwise patients become frustrated and lose less weight. How can you argue with this logic? Well, according to Allison, data suggest that people do better with more ambitious goals. Think big to lose big.

Myth 3: Gradually losing weight is better than quickly losing pounds because quick weight losses are more likely to be regained. This myth, likely dating back to the 1960s, has no biological basis, the researchers said. In fact, studies reveal that people who lose more weight rapidly are more likely keep off the pounds even several years later.

Myth 4: Patients who feel "ready" to lose weight are more likely to make the required lifestyle changes. Being "ready" doesn't hurt. But studies have shown that the degree of readiness or willingness to diet doesn't predict the magnitude of weight loss or adherence to a program.

Myth 5: Physical-education classes, in their current form, play an important role in reducing or preventing childhood obesity. Studies actually have shown, perhaps surprisingly, that increasing the number of days that phys-ed is offered does not reduce childhood obesity. The researchers speculate this is because the type of exercise — in terms of frequency, intensity and duration — isn't enough to promote sustained weight loss. Or, obese kids who need it most aren't moving in pace with other students.

Myth 6: Breast-feeding protects the breastfed offspring against future obesity. Breast-feeding has many positive effects for the child, such as increased IQ and immunity, but obesity protection is not among the benefits. Although the belief is passionately defended, large studies in recent years have found that one's breast-feeding history is not a determinant for obesity.

Myth 7: One episode of sex can burn up to 300 calories per person. Well, maybe it's worth a try. Allison's group crunched the numbers and calculated that a 150-pound man would burn about 250 calories per 60 minutes of vigorous and continuous sex. Studies reveal, however, that most sexual intercourse lasts only six minutes, which translates to 20 calories burned — not much more than sitting on a chair and watching television. [10 Most Surprising Sex Statistics]

Among presumptions yet to be proven true or false, the researchers said, are that snacking contributes to weight gain; that regularly eating (and not skipping) a healthful breakfast protects against weight gain; that building sidewalks and walking and biking trails reduces obesity rates; and that yo-yo dieting is associated with premature death.

Among proven dieting facts, the researcher said, are the points that exercise improves health regardless of whether weight is lost, and that genetics is not destiny — that is, anyone can maintain a healthy weight.

Not that deadly?

Published the same day as the Allison-led paper, in the current issue of the American Journal of Medicine, obesity researcher Charles Hennekens of Florida Atlantic University reported on what some consider to be another obesity myth: that obesity is not that deadly.

Hennekens said that "the dangers of obesity have been grossly underestimated" and that obesity is approaching smoking as the leading cause of preventable premature death, mainly as a contributor to type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

"Unless Americans lose weight and increase their levels of physical activity, cardiovascular disease will remain the leading killer in the U.S.," Hennekens said.

Recent studies have given the impression that carrying a few extra pounds can be healthy. Allison explained that the misconception might stem from the fact that certain populations, such as older people, can tolerate extra weight. The extra weight can be beneficial if that older person develops a disease such as cancer, in which the patient loses weight during the treatment.

This does not imply that being overweight throughout your life is healthy, Allison said. Hennekens added that childhood obesity is of particular concern, increasing the risk of developing type 2 diabetes and heart disease before age 30.

Fortunately, as Allison's group has helped publicize, diets — particularly those that reduce energy intake — very effectively reduce weight, and environmental changes such as exercise can help prevent weight gain.

Well I did join and went full in for the BMI and the 10% challenge. Another FWer joined with me. Still waiting on the rest of you. My registration number is 7620157237.

It has been almost a month, and I am going with the "myth" that slower is better. I have lost almost 5% and the bummer is that the 10% challenge isn't over for another 162 days.

I think I can easily gain 10% and then lose it again, but $300 does not seem like enough money. I would cost me over $200 in additional food expenses to again 10% of my weight.

Damn it! Wish I learned about this a few years ago before I started lifting and doing paleo. Trying to gain muscle now so I missed out

Earn money for loosing weight? Is this for real? Very interesting.

My company participates in this. Definitely a great program!

chuah said:   Earn money for loosing weight? Is this for real? Very interesting.

I would recommend reading this thread and the website to see if this is for you.

I'm 3 months in and another 5% of weight loss away from the payday. I have 0 strikes and haven't found checking in with 2x per week weight reports to be a big deal at all. Others here have noted they paid who did this prior, and I'll report back either way as well. PM me if you decide to join and I'll send you my registration #.

If you're in this program, or thinking about it, you might want to check out this post I just found:
http://www.fatwallet.com/forums/hot-deals/1263391/?newest=1#last

dougtaylor1 said:   Well I did join and went full in for the BMI and the 10% challenge. Another FWer joined with me. Still waiting on the rest of you. My registration number is 7620157237.

It has been almost a month, and I am going with the "myth" that slower is better. I have lost almost 5% and the bummer is that the 10% challenge isn't over for another 162 days.


Down 6%!

dougtaylor1 said:   Down 6%!

Good job Dougtaylor!

---
I haven't weighed myself since I last posted here, but I can tell that I have not lost any more weight - and in all likelihood I have probably gained about 1 pound in the last four weeks (I'm petite, so it's easy to notice small amounts).

However, I didn't join the program discussed in this thread, so I'm just losing a few pounds on my own schedule, and my current living/working situation is not ideal for buying, cooking, and eating *exactly* what food I want, when I want to (which always helps).

---
One thing that seems to have noticeably slimmed down my tummy/waist area (the unnecessary fat overlying the muscles, the kind of stuff that forms muffin tops!) is drinking about 1/2 cup of homemade coconut milk per day.

(I avoid artificial additives, sweeteners, thickeners, and so on, which all the canned and boxed coconut milks in the US seem to have, even the "organic" ones, so I just make my own coconut milk with dried organic coconut flakes - such as from Bob's Red Mill, hot water, a fine-mesh strainer, and a blender.)

---
It seems that the MCT (medium-chain triglycerides) in coconut milk and other coconut products have certain properties which lower abdominal fat.

I can say that this really does seem to be the case for my body. Even the small amount of 1/2 cup a day of coconut milk has had a noticeable effect on my midsection in the last couple of months.

---
The following quote is from a Livestrong website article, which are not always the most trustworthy or complete compendiums of knowledge, so I don't automatically trust what they say, but this paragraph seems to be factual:
"The medium-chain triglycerides in coconut milk may increase thermogenesis, or the process in which your body metabolizes fats, according to doctor of biology and physiology specialist Ray Peat.
Research published in the December 2002 edition of the "Journal of Nutritional Science and Vitaminology" observed the effects of diet-induced thermogenesis on the accumulation of body fat in rats fed a diet of MCTs or LCTs. Based on two experiments, rats receiving MCTs experienced significantly larger diet-induced thermogenesis and had significantly lower carcass and intra-abdominal fat than those consuming LCTs. Researchers concluded that diet-induced thermogenesis was a main factor in suppressing body fat accumulation in rats fed MCTs when compared to rats fed LCTs.
This is the research study referred to above (on rats): http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12775120

This next study was on humans, and the statements couldn't be clearer:
"Medium-chain triglyceride (MCT) consumption has been shown to increase energy expenditure (EE) and lead to greater losses of the adipose tissue in animals and humans.
...[S]hunting of dietary fat towards oxidation results in diminished fat storage, as reflected by the loss of BW (body weight) and subcutaneous adipose tissue."
from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12975635

---
Here are a few more studies that showed some good effects of MCT:

Medium-chain triglycerides increase energy expenditure and decrease adiposity in overweight men
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12634436

Weight-loss diet that includes consumption of medium-chain triacylglycerol oil leads to a greater rate of weight and fat mass loss than does olive oil
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18326600

High-level medium-chain triglyceride feeding and energy expenditure in normal-weight women
"...there were no changes in resting metabolic rate, transient increases in postprandial energy expenditure, and significant increases in postprandial fat oxidation."
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17632585

Medium-chain triglycerides are advantageous in promoting weight loss although not beneficial to exercise performance
"MCT increase fat oxidation and energy expenditure as well as reduce food intake and beneficially alter body composition"
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20367215

---
There does seem to be quite a bit of evidence in favor of MCT having a positive effect on fat-burning and body-composition, at least for some people and some animal species.

However, there are some studies which didn't show statistically-significant effects of MCT, so I'm not sure what the general consensus is.

Here are some scientific overview articles which reviewed many previous experiments to see what the current state of knowledge is about MCT and fat/weight:

Influence of the dietary intake of medium chain triglycerides on body composition, energy expenditure and satiety: a systematic review
"Medium chain triglycerides (MCT) are rapidly metabolized and less stored in the adipose tissue, being a possible tool for weight control. In order to analyze the influence of consumption of this lipid on satiety, body composition and energy expenditure (EE), a literature review was performed of controlled clinical studies.... Fourteen articles were selected presenting short and long-term intervention. Among these, six showed a decrease in body mass of individuals, with consequent loss of weight. Only one showed a positive effect on satiation and four showed an increase in EE (energy expenditure). Thus the results are inconclusive and there is a need for further controlled studies with standardized amounts of MCT, so that its use can become an alternative for obesity nutritional treatment."
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22566308

Influence of medium-chain triglycerides on consumption and weight gain in rats: a systematic review
"The use of medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) has been studied for years in an attempt to elucidate their effects in food intake and body weight in animals. A search of scientific work was performed.... Thirteen papers were selected.... Twelve studies measured weight gain and among these, seven detected a decrease in weight gain and five found no differences. Twelve papers also measured food intake and among these, four detected a decrease in consumption, one detected an increase and seven found no differences.
...it is concluded that there is strong evidence that MCTs can effectively reduce the consumption and subsequent weight gain of animals."
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23298149

---
The problem with trying to look this topic up on a normal internet search engine is that most of the search results are from companies that are trying to sell coconut products, or those thrown-together, non-expert "articles" on sites like Livestrong, instead of views expressed by authentic doctors/experts. That is why I included so many scientific research studies in this post.

---
For anyone who wishes to reduce midsection girth a little, I would say that it's worth a try to include a little bit of coconut in your diet, and see if there is any effect.

You can do coconut oil, coconut milk, coconut cream, etc. Make Indian or Thai curries, drink the milk with cereal and so forth, make homemade chocolate bars (with cocoa powder, flaked coconut, vanilla flavoring, nuts, and coconut oil), make fruit smoothies with it, cook with the oil as you would olive oil or butter, use the oil as a spread like you would butter on toast (some people really do this!), etc.

For the coconut oil (which makes really tasty homemade popcorn!), my favorite (and a top-rated one by many reviewers) is Nature's Way EFA Gold Pure Extra Virgin, available at good prices on Amazon and other online retailers like Swanson Vitamins. It can also be found at B&M stores (at my local WalMart, they have it in the nutritional supplements section of the pharmacy area, and it's 1.5 times more expensive there than on Amazon).

For the coconut flakes, if you want to try to make your own homemade coconut milk, do NOT go for the heavily-sweetened, moist, thickly cut ones that are marketed for traditional American baking and are usually found in the supermarket with the normal chocolate chips and the baking nuts. Instead, there are several brands of just dried and flaked coconut, tiny pieces, nothing added, and you can choose organic or not organic. You can usually get at least one brand of those in a big "normal" supermarket in the "alternative baking ingredients" area (the area which has the gluten-free flours, the carob chips, the flaxseed, and that kind of thing), or somewhere like Whole Foods if you are lucky enough to have one close by. Bob's Red Mill is one of the widely available brands and you can get a 4-pack on Amazon for a good price.



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