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Superbiiz has the Seagate ST2000DM001 2TB 7200RPM SATA3/SATA 6.0 GB/s 64MB Hard Drive (3.5 inch) for a good price

Drive for $94.99
Coupon - $14.25 (harbowl)
Total: 80.74 + shipping

SuperBiiz.com
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Seagate ST2000DM001 2TB (3.77kB)
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Why can't they specify warranty at superbiiz ? Or is it 30-day DOA only?

TABAC said:   Why can't they specify warranty at superbiiz ? Or is it 30-day DOA only?

2yr warranty according to Newegg HERE . Reviews not so hot .

shipping 6.95 to chicago

It sure has taken a long time for 2TB drives to finally return to their pre-flood price level. In the mean time all the profiteering and likely artificial product shortage has finally mad SSDs more viable thus creating competition.

GWBush said:   It sure has taken a long time for 2TB drives to finally return to their pre-flood price level. In the mean time all the profiteering and likely artificial product shortage has finally mad SSDs more viable thus creating competition.
Profiteering? What does that word even mean? What you've been seeing is that higher prices have gotten the drives that did exist to be used where they were most valued. That's a *good* thing.

GWBush said:   It sure has taken a long time for 2TB drives to finally return to their pre-flood price level. In the mean time all the profiteering and likely artificial product shortage has finally mad SSDs more viable thus creating competition.
The pre-flood prices were too low. The computer hardware industry has some of the thinnest profit margins of any industry. Typically less than 10% vs. an economy-wide average of about 15%. Hard drives were close to the bottom of the barrel, with profit margins of about 5% or less.

"But small profit margins are good!" right? Nope. It means the manufacturers don't have as much money to put into R&D. Think about it - if there were zero profit margins, there would be no money for R&D, and technology would never improve. If a piece of hardware is important to modern technology, you want it to have a reasonably high profit margin so more money can be invested into improving it more quickly.

With the economics of the hard drive industry being broken for about 3 decades now, current storage density is probably many years behind where it should be. In other words, you're gleeful 2TB drives have dropped below $100 again. But if HDD profit margins had been healthier for the last few decades, we'd probably be at 4-8 TB drives being below $100 right now. The price we pay for HDDs being cheap for 3 decades is that the technology hasn't improved as quickly as it could have.

Current HDD prices are probably about right, maybe a bit too high since the industry over-reacted to the thin margins and over-consolidated (there are only 3 HDD manufacturers now, and only 2 of them make 3.5" drives).

If you wanna complain about profiteering, go complain about Apple, or the banks and brokerages.
http://biz.yahoo.com/p/sum_qpmd.html
(And before you proclaim Personal Computers have a 20% net profit margin on that list, that's almost entirely due to Apple. Dell's net profit margin is 3.5%.)
http://biz.yahoo.com/p/811qpmd.html

Solandri said:   GWBush said:   It sure has taken a long time for 2TB drives to finally return to their pre-flood price level. In the mean time all the profiteering and likely artificial product shortage has finally mad SSDs more viable thus creating competition.
The pre-flood prices were too low. The computer hardware industry has some of the thinnest profit margins of any industry. Typically less than 10% vs. an economy-wide average of about 15%. Hard drives were close to the bottom of the barrel, with profit margins of about 5% or less.

"But small profit margins are good!" right? Nope. It means the manufacturers don't have as much money to put into R&D. Think about it - if there were zero profit margins, there would be no money for R&D, and technology would never improve. If a piece of hardware is important to modern technology, you want it to have a reasonably high profit margin so more money can be invested into improving it more quickly.

With the economics of the hard drive industry being broken for about 3 decades now, current storage density is probably many years behind where it should be. In other words, you're gleeful 2TB drives have dropped below $100 again. But if HDD profit margins had been healthier for the last few decades, we'd probably be at 4-8 TB drives being below $100 right now. The price we pay for HDDs being cheap for 3 decades is that the technology hasn't improved as quickly as it could have...[/L]


And just how many people need 4 to 8 TB hard drives? Most people won't ever fill a 100 GB hard drive. Most people don't rip DVDs or Blu-rays or have multi terabyte MKV and/or MP3 collections. Only a small subset of users do but they tend to be overrepresented on sites like this so you get a distorted view of things and thus think there are a lot more users who need really large drives then there actually are. Enterprise users might need it but they already pay a lot more for their hard drives so let them pay the R&D for 4 to 8 TB drives.

Remember warrenty details at one retailer often do not apply across he board to other shops. This is a years old issue where everyone plays their own
games with the junk drives they sell. And indeed the reports coming out
on this drive arriving DOA or dying shortly after are very grim. Have seen two dead ones and would not pay half this bargain price to see a third. Also remember if you do get a bad drive from most places you have to pay the return shipping. And to top that off it is up to the merchant and the manufacturer whether they replace it with a new factory sealed drive.....or a so called refurb/repaired from the factory. And some will charge you shipping AGAIN.

Folks, buying a drive in todays world is pure russian roulette.

Western Digital and their dealers are selling supposedly super drives that
they do not mention are OEM, in a bare box, no instructions except for very tiny print on the label that can be deciphered in several ways. One statement on the label talks about adding their jumpers (not included) between pins 1 and 8 to prevent having to download a weird utility to 'prepare' the drive. If read from one
direction if you use the jumper method you drop capacity from 2 gig to 1.5 gig. That is mentioned on the WD website with no details as to why. Oh and it is a SATA high speed and a call to the factory to see if it was backward compatible to slower controllers could not be answered. Duuuuhhhh.

Bring on the SSDs, even though they warn us the life span varies with how much you use them at least we are warned so we can keep half a dozen spares on hand.

Solandri said:   GWBush said:   It sure has taken a long time for 2TB drives to finally return to their pre-flood price level. In the mean time all the profiteering and likely artificial product shortage has finally mad SSDs more viable thus creating competition.
The pre-flood prices were too low. The computer hardware industry has some of the thinnest profit margins of any industry. Typically less than 10% vs. an economy-wide average of about 15%. Hard drives were close to the bottom of the barrel, with profit margins of about 5% or less.

"But small profit margins are good!" right? Nope. It means the manufacturers don't have as much money to put into R&D. Think about it - if there were zero profit margins, there would be no money for R&D, and technology would never improve. If a piece of hardware is important to modern technology, you want it to have a reasonably high profit margin so more money can be invested into improving it more quickly.
Another way to look at it is that no money into R&D means consumers don't care about improvements in a given product.

IRL, with a market like this, what would happen in your situation (Where customers base decisions off of better performing products versus price) is that the company that invested even a small amount in R&D would take market share because it would offer something no one else did, and competitors would have to emulate them or fall behind.

In terms of profit, the ideal situation in capitalism is actually zero profit (But still investment in R&D in applicable markets) due to Perfect Competition.

Edit - I should say zero real profit. A company should make enough to keep up with inflation.

retiredlawman said:   
Western Digital and their dealers are selling supposedly super drives that they do not mention are OEM, in a bare box, no instructions except for very tiny print on the label that can be deciphered in several ways. One statement on the label talks about adding their jumpers (not included) between pins 1 and 8 to prevent having to download a weird utility to 'prepare' the drive. If read from one direction if you use the jumper method you drop capacity from 2 gig to 1.5 gig. That is mentioned on the WD website with no details as to why. Oh and it is a SATA high speed and a call to the factory to see if it was backward compatible to slower controllers could not be answered. Duuuuhhhh.

Western Digital drives that use 4KB physical sectors have a jumper for aligning the first partition to an even 4KB boundary, to prevent slow writes to disk when using older versions of Windows, such as XP, which don't align partitions. However that jumper works only for the first partition, and alignment can also be done with utilities provided by hard disk manufacturers, but that can be very slow because all the data has to be moved over. It's generally faster to align the partitions when they're created, such as manufacturers' utilities, versions of Windows newer than XP, and third party programs, such as G-parted.

Seagate 4KB drives aren't affected at all by misaligned partitions because they handle the matter internally.

WD and Seagate hard drives have a different jumper to limit the maximum speed to 1.5 gigabits/sec, but it's needed only for old SATA controllers that weren't implemented correctly, the most famous being those based on VIA chipsets, like the 8237, 8237R, and 8237A for motherboards (but the 8237s works fine) or the VT6421, VT6421L, and probably versions of the VT6421A for plug-in controllers. Even decade-old Intel chipsets and the original SATA controller chips from Silicon Image and Promise, handle faster drives just fine, including SATA III/ 6 gigabits/sec drives, despite those chips maxing out at 1.5 gigabits/sec transfer rate.



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