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In-store only, NOT available online, YMMV. Reg. $189, now $149 after manufacturer's instant coupon. This unit has a smaller footprint than the older models, even though the tank is the same size. The filters come in their own canister, and change out is much easier. This is an essential product in most of the Western US where the water is very hard and doesn't taste good!

Product Features

High end designer brushed nickel electronic monitor faucet lets you know when its time to change filters
Quick change sanitary filters (available in-store, year's supply $40)
Easy to install
Filters change out at the push of a button
High production thin film membrane for quick recovery
Crystal clear, high quality and great tasting water

Member Summary

Watts Reverse Osmosis
Thanks UncleRico
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Most Recent Posts
Does this unit require an air gap faucet? Thx.

dwayne33 (Feb. 15, 2013 @ 9:47p) |

Not sure if anyone noticed, the replacement filter for this quick release unit is more expensive than the older, screw i... (more)

all168 (Feb. 16, 2013 @ 12:13a) |

yes the filters for this unit cost more. not sure what the prices were on Amazon that you saw. on costco.com a years wor... (more)

blankblank (Feb. 18, 2013 @ 5:45p) |

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Reverse Osmosis water is great.. Several of the bottled waters including aquafina (spelling?) are RO water. You can get the same thing at home with a $150 investment.

I love my Watts system that I got at costco ~6 years ago. Redesign of filters looks great, but not worth replacing my current system.

Curious, why would one want this kind of filtered water? In Houston tap water is so bad, I just buy mine in the store for internal intake. I doubt this filtered system would provide the quantity and quality.

This system would provide you with gallons of water per day. The filtering process for reverse osmosis is fairly slow, so to remedy that it fills up the included pressure tank (which is probably about 2 gallons). Once the tank is filled (roughly an hour) You can fill your own bottles in about 10 seconds. If you need more than 2 gallons at a time, this system wouldn't work well, but for my family of 4 that drinks mostly water, we can fill everyone's glasses for lunch/supper and still have plenty to fill up sports bottles for a bike ride. We love our water so much that you rarely see anyone leaving the house without at least one self filled bottle of water... our most used container is gator-aide bottles - they are built well and hold up to months worth of abuse before swapping them out for a new one.

Guess I didn't answer why anyone would want this type of water - it tastes great. As I stated before a very high percentage of bottled water is actually just tap water that has been filtered using reverse osmosis - aquafina is one such example - see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aquafina

Google "Reverse Osmosis" and educate yourself, unless you really enjoy lugging all the water home from the stores.

I aslo run a connection from the tank to my Fridge for clean tasting ICE

How much for the replacement filters?

teststrips said:   This system would provide you with gallons of water per day. The filtering process for reverse osmosis is fairly slow, so to remedy that it fills up the included pressure tank (which is probably about 2 gallons). Once the tank is filled (roughly an hour) You can fill your own bottles in about 10 seconds. If you need more than 2 gallons at a time, this system wouldn't work well, but for my family of 4 that drinks mostly water, we can fill everyone's glasses for lunch/supper and still have plenty to fill up sports bottles for a bike ride. We love our water so much that you rarely see anyone leaving the house without at least one self filled bottle of water... our most used container is gator-aide bottles - they are built well and hold up to months worth of abuse before swapping them out for a new one.

Guess I didn't answer why anyone would want this type of water - it tastes great. As I stated before a very high percentage of bottled water is actually just tap water that has been filtered using reverse osmosis - aquafina is one such example - see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aquafina


this unit has a 3 gallon tank. also if you add a permeate pump it fills up much faster. i would estimate mines fills up 3x faster than before the pump.

teststrips said:   Reverse Osmosis water is gat.. Several of the bottled waters including aquafina (spelling?) are RO water. You can get the same thing at home with a $150 investment.

I love my Watts system that I got at costco ~6 years ago. Redesign of filters looks great, but not worth replacing my current system.


i replaced an older Watts system with this one a few years back. not having to sanitize and flush the system when changing filters is fantastic. when's the last time you replaced your RO membrane? if your due for one investing that cost into this system is something to consider.

$50 for a years worth if you use less water you can run them longer. The RO cartridge is good for 2-5 yrs and is $50 by itself. My system is 5 yrs old and water still taste good.


Install a large $35 Carbon Inline filter from Home Depot/Lowes before the RO system to extend the life of the more $$$ filters.

http://www.lowes.com/pd_31586-43353-EP-INL30_0__?productId=30325...

BlueLetterD said:   Curious, why would one want this kind of filtered water? In Houston tap water is so bad, I just buy mine in the store for internal intake. I doubt this filtered system would provide the quantity and quality.
Same thing as buying bottled water....

WorkerAnt said:   How much for the replacement filters?
$40 or less for a year's worth of easy-to-change filters (Costco), plus another $40 or so every 2-3 years to change out a separate membrane filter (Amazon). A retrofit zero-waste permeate filter setup is about $190, but is not necessary unless you want one. A handy person can install the RO unit in an hour or 2.

blankblank said:   teststrips said:   ...

Guess I didn't answer why anyone would want this type of water - it tastes great. As I stated before a very high percentage of bottled water is actually just tap water that has been filtered using reverse osmosis - aquafina is one such example - see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aquafina


this unit has a 3 gallon tank. also if you add a permeate pump it fills up much faster. i would estimate mines fills up 3x faster than before the pump.


Any recommendations for a permeate pump? Also does this produce distilled water, or what is the TDS (total dissolved solids) of the water produced?

To clarify for folks who are not familiar with this type of system, the RO unit with its pressure tank is intended to be installed under the kitchen sink. It has its own separate faucet that dispenses up to 3-4 gallons per day of pure, sweet water. You can (and should!) hook it up to your refrigerator ice/water dispenser, too. The ice will be mostly clear and very good-tasting. The unit on sale at Costco is a very good one, with simplified installation and is very easy to maintain. As long as the water coming in to your kitchen is safe to drink, a unit like this will improve the taste remarkably. It WILL NOT sanitize unsafe drinking water, and cannot be used to so so. If the incoming water exceeds certain hardness or other parameters (research more on the net), adding a permeate filter will help lots. A permeate filter will also reduce the amount of waste water that an RO unit generates, an important factor in desert locations where water is very expensive. If your family is using more than a gallon of bottled water per day, the unit will overall eventually pay for itself. Plus, you will have nice water from your refrigerator and good ice, and will not likely run out at inconvenient times. Once folks get one of these, they will likely always want one wherever they live! They are just great! THIS IS A VERY GOOD PRICE for an upscale unit (more features and a nicer faucet than the one on Amazon for $189) with lots of convenience and a smaller footprint. My sincere recommendation is to not hesitate!

Great tasting water and I use it to wash my car as well. No hard water stains.

Total dissolved solids (TDS) out is dependent on several factors, including TDS in, water pressure, and age and condition of the filters among others. The water in this RO unit undergoes 4 stages of filtration, including moving through a semi-permeable membrane. It is NOT a distillation process, which ordinarily heats water to steam and then re-condenses it, leaving the solids behind. An example of a simple testing device which can be used for before-and-after TDS measurements can be found here

rj123456 said:   blankblank said:   teststrips said:   ...

Guess I didn't answer why anyone would want this type of water - it tastes great. As I stated before a very high percentage of bottled water is actually just tap water that has been filtered using reverse osmosis - aquafina is one such example - see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aquafina


this unit has a 3 gallon tank. also if you add a permeate pump it fills up much faster. i would estimate mines fills up 3x faster than before the pump.


Any recommendations for a permeate pump? Also does this produce distilled water, or what is the TDS (total dissolved solids) of the water produced?


Aquatec ERP-500 is what i have. Watts sells the ERP-1000 on their website but the 500 is much quieter. almost silent in my setup. the 500 is rated for 50gal per day which is also what the RO-Pure system is rated at as well. i called Watts to buy the connectors needed to hook it up. the pump was about $50 and the parts from Watts were about $10 shipping included. keep in mind this was a few years ago.

no it does not produce distilled water.

the TDS of the end product depends on the water your starting with mostly. here in NYC the TDS is low to begin with so all my RO water is at zero.

MrLincoln said:   It has its own separate faucet that dispenses up to 3-4 gallons per day

agree with everything you said but what do you mean by this? this unit is rate for up to 50gal per day.

FYI Watts makes 3 types of filters:
- The old screw-in type with replaceable universal generic elements. These are very inexpensive to maintain but require tools, bleach and scrubbing to keep the clumsy canisters clean. Very bulky with lots of hoses all over the place.
- This "RO-pure" pushbutton system with proprietary disposable cartridges, much smaller filter elements, and a single manifold to manage connections without a tangle of hoses. No cleaning, no tools, no spills, you don't even need to turn off the water to change filters, just push the button.
- The new "EZ-RO" system is identical to the obsolete RO-Pure except with a simpler cam-lock in place of the pushbutton. Cartridges are not interchangeable amongst any of the 3 types.

Permeate pumps claim to reduce waste whilst improving quality, pressure, and speed. The "silent" ERP-500 makes a tapping noise that sounds like a small hammer hitting the wall once per second. I can only assume the ERP-1000 sounds somewhat like a sledgehammer busting thru the wall every second and is clearly marketed for commercial use only, where the noise may be tolerable. Some intelligence and a few street elbows are required to tap into the compact and concealed plumbing of these units but it can be done cleanly and internally without modification.

You'd be better off spending the money and getting a unit that has 3/8 inch lines. This unit most likely has 1/4 inch. Too long to fill a glass with water. You'd fall asleep trying to fill a pot.

zacksmith said:   You'd be better off spending the money and getting a unit that has 3/8 inch lines. This unit most likely has 1/4 inch. Too long to fill a glass with water. You'd fall asleep trying to fill a pot.
An understandable misconception. The water flow is strong, and rapidly fills either a glass or a large pasta cooking pot.


Or any other "w-o-w" systems?

heftylefty said:   Anyone have any thoughts re "Next RO" systems?
http://next-ro.com/index.php?c=ProductAdvantages
http://pathtowellnessmn.com/products/next-ro-water-filtration-sy...
http://evswellness.ecrater.com/p/8936676/next-ro-the-future-of-u...
http://www.amazon.com/forum/water%20filter?_encoding=UTF8&cdForu...


i see no benefit over the Watts with a permeate pump. the main benefit seems to be the speed at which the tank is filled. the Watts with a pump has the speed. i would guess that their "engine" is pump. the rest of the specs seem worst.

1.5gal plastic tank vs 3gal steel on the Watts
3 stage filtering vs 4 stages(5 if you add a carbon with the pump install like i did)
only info online on the Next seems to come from dealers vs Watt's reputation
then there's the $400 price tag

I notice this had not been mentioned but RO systems generate a lot of waste water (for every gallon of RO drinking water, you can waste anywhere from 3 to 5 gallons down the drain).

This was a dealbreaker for me and my well water quality is pretty decent (using Pur pitcher ~ 1 micron IIRC), so I opted for a Watts Premier UF-3 instead which has 3 stage filtration down to 0.2 microns, easy change filters (do not need to shut the supply when changing out filters), comes with a drinking faucet (mine was brushed satin).Costs less, wastes nothing, filters on the go. Amazon linky

If you water quality is pretty decent, I'd weigh the pros and cons of RO vs standard filtration. My two cents.

I've had this for 8 months now ... which reminds me, time to order new filters
Filter replacement costs for the UF-3 are ~ $75/yr if you follow the manufacturer's recommendation of replacing two filters (sediment, carbon block) at 6 months and the third filter (membrane) at 1 year. That's about $20 more than the RO filters but again, no wasted water, endless supply and not to mention, the UF-3 is about $25 cheaper than the RO-4, so you're pretty much covered the first year

I have tried water from reverse osmosis and don't think it tastes as good as the Bottled Spring Water that I have delivered to my house. Plus I like the fact that the water is delivered in the dispenser at very hot and very cold temperatures.

Does osmosis water taste like distilled water, with all of the minerals taken out of it?

avash said:   I notice this had not been mentioned but RO systems generate a lot of waste water (for every gallon of RO drinking water, you can waste anywhere from 3 to 5 gallons down the drain).

This was a dealbreaker for me and my well water quality is pretty decent (using Pur pitcher ~ 1 micron IIRC), so I opted for a Watts Premier UF-3 instead which has 3 stage filtration down to 0.2 microns, easy change filters (do not need to shut the supply when changing out filters), comes with a drinking faucet (mine was brushed satin).Costs less, wastes nothing, filters on the go. Amazon linky

If you water quality is pretty decent, I'd weigh the pros and cons of RO vs standard filtration. My two cents.

I've had this for 8 months now ... which reminds me, time to order new filters
Filter replacement costs for the UF-3 are ~ $75/yr if you follow the manufacturer's recommendation of replacing two filters (sediment, carbon block) at 6 months and the third filter (membrane) at 1 year. That's about $20 more than the RO filters but again, no wasted water, endless supply and not to mention, the UF-3 is about $25 cheaper than the RO-4, so you're pretty much covered the first year


you are correct. however adding a permeate pump to a RO unit improves the efficiency greatly. there is still waste but i think the pump reduces it by like 80% if i'm remembering correctly.(i could be wrong on that number)

i have friends who have a system like yours. here in NYC where the water is pretty good to begin with and it produces very good tasting water. RO removes things that the standard unit can not so it's all about what filtration level your comfortable at and the pros and cons that come with each.

We didn't like the amount of waste water either so several years ago, we got the zero-waste model that pumps the waste water back into the hot water line. It means we can't use the hot water for drinking/cooking but that's not a problem at all. Hot water is only for washing dishes anyway.

king0fSpades said:   Great tasting water and I use it to wash my car as well. No hard water stains.

How big of a storage tank do you have to be able to do this?

What is the flow rate when you use it to wash the car?

blankblank said:   avash said:   I notice this had not been mentioned but RO systems generate a lot of waste water (for every gallon of RO drinking water, you can waste anywhere from 3 to 5 gallons down the drain).

This was a dealbreaker for me and my well water quality is pretty decent (using Pur pitcher ~ 1 micron IIRC), so I opted for a Watts Premier UF-3 instead which has 3 stage filtration down to 0.2 microns, easy change filters (do not need to shut the supply when changing out filters), comes with a drinking faucet (mine was brushed satin).Costs less, wastes nothing, filters on the go. Amazon linky

If you water quality is pretty decent, I'd weigh the pros and cons of RO vs standard filtration. My two cents.

I've had this for 8 months now ... which reminds me, time to order new filters
Filter replacement costs for the UF-3 are ~ $75/yr if you follow the manufacturer's recommendation of replacing two filters (sediment, carbon block) at 6 months and the third filter (membrane) at 1 year. That's about $20 more than the RO filters but again, no wasted water, endless supply and not to mention, the UF-3 is about $25 cheaper than the RO-4, so you're pretty much covered the first year


you are correct. however adding a permeate pump to a RO unit improves the efficiency greatly. there is still waste but i think the pump reduces it by like 80% if i'm remembering correctly.(i could be wrong on that number)

i have friends who have a system like yours. here in NYC where the water is pretty good to begin with and it produces very good tasting water. RO removes things that the standard unit can not so it's all about what filtration level your comfortable at and the pros and cons that come with each.


Thank you for the info on permeate pump, I never came across it when I was researching last year. If it really reduces waste by 80%, that makes it very good

poorfatkid said:   king0fSpades said:   Great tasting water and I use it to wash my car as well. No hard water stains.

How big of a storage tank do you have to be able to do this?

What is the flow rate when you use it to wash the car?


I wash the car first with tap water. Then use one big bucket of RO water to rinse.

Would anyone be kind enough to post pictures of their installation? I'd especially appreciate seeing your permeate pump too, if you installed on as well. Thanks in advance.

I have 2 of these units. One at the kitchen sink and one in the master bath.
They are great! The new canisters are more costly than older filters, but the ease of changing them is worth it!

Does this unit require an air gap faucet? Thx.

Not sure if anyone noticed, the replacement filter for this quick release unit is more expensive than the older, screw in one. Also in Amazon, there is 2 type of quick release filter, both are more expensive than the older one. I bought one without the tank from costco before, it taste a lot worst than RO system that i don't want to recommend my friend or relative to use it, but i do concern about the waste water, last time I check, it's up to 1:8 ratio, i empty the 2gal tank, after it fill up, i had about 16gal of waste, i know it's depend on how hard the water is, but in my case, it's 1:8.

all168 said:   Not sure if anyone noticed, the replacement filter for this quick release unit is more expensive than the older, screw in one. Also in Amazon, there is 2 type of quick release filter, both are more expensive than the older one. I bought one without the tank from costco before, it taste a lot worst than RO system that i don't want to recommend my friend or relative to use it, but i do concern about the waste water, last time I check, it's up to 1:8 ratio, i empty the 2gal tank, after it fill up, i had about 16gal of waste, i know it's depend on how hard the water is, but in my case, it's 1:8.

yes the filters for this unit cost more. not sure what the prices were on Amazon that you saw. on costco.com a years worth of the canister type filters is $32.99 shipped. a years worth of filters for this unit is $49.99 shipped. so $17 more.
with my old canister unit it used to take me over an hour to sanitize and flush the system properly when changing the filters. with this unit it takes 1 minute. filters have to be changed twice a year so $17 to save two hours of time and effort is a good value for me. it depends what you value your time and effort at.



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