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http://www.hondasolarcity.com/

Eligble states: Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, the District of Columbia, Hawaii, Maryland, Massachusetts, New York, New Jersey, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Texas and Washington.

Honda and Acura customers and dealerships will be able to install solar power with little or no upfront cost, depending on the customer's choice of plans. Customers will be given a choice to pre-pay for their solar electricity or pay a monthly payment that will be lower than the cost of their current utility bill, with insurance, repairs and monitoring service included.

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Honda
Thanks Valtron9000
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Most Recent Posts
I have the same situation. Electric is pretty cheap here in a lot of the midwest. When not including the service charges... (more)

WootHead (Feb. 23, 2013 @ 11:48a) |

I have consulted on more than a few solar power deals (mostly utility scale projects), so I can explain a little of the ... (more)

adam694 (Mar. 06, 2013 @ 12:39p) |

Your devices use what they need. They won't burn out from excess. If that was the case everything in your house would b... (more)

danhoyer (Mar. 24, 2013 @ 11:49a) |

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titewad said:   
Customers will be given a choice to pre-pay for their solar electricity ...


Isn't the point of solar electricity that it's ... oh never mind...

kimgkimg said:   titewad said:   
Customers will be given a choice to pre-pay for their solar electricity ...


Isn't the point of solar electricity that it's ... oh never mind...

Someone's gotta pay for the installation.

Update link please.

Someone also has to pay for that equipment that gets installed as well.

Can YOU buy a system up front then get free electricity? Yes, with a huge up front cost and the potential of the system working/not working as hoped for.

Owning/buying a Honda auto is not required. It might get you $750 credit towards the cost but this program is available to anyone in select states. The details are really quite vague but what is available is HERE.

Reading the title I thought you have to own the Honda automobile.
Anyone fine out how much does it cost?

Just FYI, Honda and SolarCity are independent companies. SolarCity has been offering this for a while but only recently partnering with Honda.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/02/20/solarcity-honda-idUSL1...

IMO, it is no different from installing a solar panel through no money down financing. I bet the customer will be on the hook for a minimum payment for years to come.

A friend of mine has got a Honda Accord the year before last. The price is about $20000. But now he has paid over $1200 for Car maintenance.

Nice find. So happy to find the deal here. Give a green.

Im sorry. What is your point?

Generally, these companies pay all costs, they install on your house, they sell the electricity to the power co, and you get a discounted electrical bill for allowing them to sell the power they generate on your house...

titewad said:   http://www.hondasolarcity.com/

Eligble states: Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, the District of Columbia, Hawaii, Maryland, Massachusetts, New York, New Jersey, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Texas and Washington.



I live in Portland, OR.

Just how am I supposed to generate solar energy/electricity in the beautiful Pacific Northwest, when the sun only shines 142 days a year....and that includes partly sunny days. Pipe dreams here in the Pacific Northwest.

Portland/Oregon sunshine

BTW....love living here.

Guess it would save money from buying a power generator
As it seems in NY - it's become a necessity with the storms and downed power lines.

How long of a contract do you need to sign and maintain service with them?

guilty1 said:   titewad said:   http://www.hondasolarcity.com/

Eligble states: Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, the District of Columbia, Hawaii, Maryland, Massachusetts, New York, New Jersey, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Texas and Washington.



I live in Portland, OR.

Just how am I supposed to generate solar energy/electricity in the beautiful Pacific Northwest, when the sun only shines 142 days a year....and that includes partly sunny days. Pipe dreams here in the Pacific Northwest.

Portland/Oregon sunshine

BTW....love living here.


Direct sunshine does NOT equate to better solar power. Heat can be an issue. Germany has the highest solar production in the world and their climate is very similar to our PNW.

cgott42 said:   Guess it would save money from buying a power generator
As it seems in NY - it's become a necessity with the storms and downed power lines.

How long of a contract do you need to sign and maintain service with them?

Solar panels are generally wired to the grid, so if the grid is down, the solar panel won't work.
This is because the solar panels may generate more or less then the devices you use. If your devices require more power, especially during night time, the grid provides the rest, if the devices does not need all of the power, then the excess is fed back to the grid so your electronics are not overloaded and burnt out.

Maybe I'm not understanding this deal but my initial reaction is this deal kinda sucks for the home owner.

A better deal would be to get a little of the juice for free rather than having to pay for it.
Then again if its like mineral rights it doesn't work like that.

thanks OP

KYBOSH said:   Maybe I'm not understanding this deal but my initial reaction is this deal kinda sucks for the home owner.

A better deal would be to get a little of the juice for free rather than having to pay for it.
Then again if its like mineral rights it doesn't work like that.

Well if you look at it this way you are getting a little juice for free. You get a discount on your electric bill, So you can use the same amount as usual and pay less= some free electricity just not all of it free.

Just finished installing a solar system on my home in NJ. Around here many companies are offering free installation and steep discounts on the electricity. My system was installed for free with a 20 year agreement that I pay 7.1 cent (delivery inc.) for all electricity produced. The Jcp&L going rate (inc. delivery) is between 13 and 16 cents per kwh. No additional charges and the rate is fixed. So OP, look around and you may find better deals out there, depending on your state green energy mandates and SREC market. Good luck.

yzj said:   Just finished installing a solar system on my home in NJ. Around here many companies are offering free installation and steep discounts on the electricity. My system was installed for free with a 20 year agreement that I pay 7.1 cent (delivery inc.) for all electricity produced....

You signed a 20-yr agreement. What happens if you decide to move before the 20-yrs are up?

yzj said:   Just finished installing a solar system on my home in NJ. Around here many companies are offering free installation and steep discounts on the electricity. My system was installed for free with a 20 year agreement that I pay 7.1 cent (delivery inc.) for all electricity produced. The Jcp&L going rate (inc. delivery) is between 13 and 16 cents per kwh. No additional charges and the rate is fixed. So OP, look around and you may find better deals out there, depending on your state green energy mandates and SREC market. Good luck.

That is a good deal. Im impressed. Is that contract transferrable?
Bet would make a GREAT selling point if you were to ever put your house on the market.

Not a hot deal. This is just a targeted markting plan, not any kind of special deal.

HappyScrappyHeroPup said:   Not a hot deal. This is just a targeted markting plan, not any kind of special deal.


the lack of details and specific pricing concerns me --- I need to look at this shit before some sales creep starts giving me some dumbass spiel

If they can't email me specific info without a consultation --- I am going to yell at them and then report this whole thing to Honda corporate

GeorgiaBulldawg said:   yzj said:   Just finished installing a solar system on my home in NJ. Around here many companies are offering free installation and steep discounts on the electricity. My system was installed for free with a 20 year agreement that I pay 7.1 cent (delivery inc.) for all electricity produced....

You signed a 20-yr agreement. What happens if you decide to move before the 20-yrs are up?


If I sell the house I have the option of having the buyer assume the contract, or of buying the system based on future expected energy production. Also at several predetermined points during the contract I have the option to buy the system outright as well.

Always discussing this with my brother. He wants Solar bad. Price it out. The numbers barely work with the federal and state "assistance" By the time you pay off the system it's at end of life. Time to scrap it and buy another one. There's nothing "free" with solar, at least not yet.

Red55 said:   Always discussing this with my brother. He wants Solar bad. Price it out. The numbers barely work with the federal and state "assistance" By the time you pay off the system it's at end of life. Time to scrap it and buy another one. There's nothing "free" with solar, at least not yet.

Not true where I live. And many others on FW can tell you the same.

Even with almost no assistance except the federal assistance, payback will be about 8-10 years. For others who use more electricity and size their system more appropriately, it could be as short as 5-6. On FWer who did his own install and fudged his taxes will pay back under 3 years (IIRC), even if he didn't fudge his taxes it would be only 4 years.

I live in Upstate, NY (about 25-30 miles North if Utica).

We've owned a 5kW solar system for 3 years now and I can tell you, I generate a lot more on clear, sunny days than I do on cloudy.

This was our output for March 2011

All the recordings of 20+kW were on mostly sunny days and the two 32+kW days were completely cloudless.

This is our setup

This system has worked well and we have saved a lot of money but, if it weren't for the credits, etc., it wouldn't be financially feasible to buy the system because it is so overpriced (IMHO).

I can also tell you that up here, you don't generate anything (very, very little) during the December/January months because of the number of extremely heavy cloudy days, the pitch of the panels and snow/ice covering.

Our house is completely electric, other than the oil/wood/coal forced hot air heat. Our average summer monthly electric bill in 2009 was $120. In 2012, it was $25. The other upgrade that also contributed to big savings was getting rid of our old hot water heater for a GE GeoSpring Hybrid water heater..

And Red55, your comment was close. Our system has a projected lifespan of 25 years but, during those years, the capability of the system diminishes over time. I think it's something like -5/7% every 5 years. We expect to make up for our investment in 12 years. If electric prices increase, slightly sooner. The other positive about this system was it increased the value of our home and yet our taxes did not increase.

Again, without the incentives, we would of never taken the plunge. Our system cost $27k. After the upfront incentives, it cost is $14k out of pocket. The tax deductions were a government scam. We thought we'd be getting it all back when in fact, we got some of the promised $$$'s broken up over several years.

We actually had one clown give us an estimate of $65K for the system and tried to sell us on the "saving the planet" BS. Every contractor/installer will tell you the same thing, the government kicks in 30% of the cost (and you wonder why the cost is outrageous?!).

ezwrighter said:   guilty1 said:   titewad said:   http://www.hondasolarcity.com/

Eligble states: Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, the District of Columbia, Hawaii, Maryland, Massachusetts, New York, New Jersey, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Texas and Washington.



I live in Portland, OR.

Just how am I supposed to generate solar energy/electricity in the beautiful Pacific Northwest, when the sun only shines 142 days a year....and that includes partly sunny days. Pipe dreams here in the Pacific Northwest.

Portland/Oregon sunshine

BTW....love living here.


Direct sunshine does NOT equate to better solar power. Heat can be an issue. Germany has the highest solar production in the world and their climate is very similar to our PNW.



What BamBam0099 said.......

BamBam0099 said:   I live in Upstate, NY (about 25-30 miles North if Utica).

We've owned a 5kW solar system for 3 years now and I can tell you, I generate a lot more on clear, sunny days than I do on cloudy.

This was our output for March 2011

All the recordings of 20+kW were on mostly sunny days and the two 32+kW days were completely cloudless.

This is our setup

This system has worked well and we have saved a lot of money but, if it weren't for the credits, etc., it wouldn't be financially feasible to buy the system because it is so overpriced (IMHO).

I can also tell you that up here, you don't generate anything (very, very little) during the December/January months because of the number of extremely heavy cloudy days, the pitch of the panels and snow/ice covering.

Our house is completely electric, other than the oil/wood/coal forced hot air heat. Our average summer monthly electric bill in 2009 was $120. In 2012, it was $25. The other upgrade that also contributed to big savings was getting rid of our old hot water heater for a GE GeoSpring Hybrid water heater..

And Red55, your comment was close. Our system has a projected lifespan of 25 years but, during those years, the capability of the system diminishes over time. I think it's something like -5/7% every 5 years. We expect to make up for our investment in 12 years. If electric prices increase, slightly sooner. The other positive about this system was it increased the value of our home and yet our taxes did not increase.

Again, without the incentives, we would of never taken the plunge. Our system cost $27k. After the upfront incentives, it cost is $14k out of pocket. The tax deductions were a government scam. We thought we'd be getting it all back when in fact, we got some of the promised $$$'s broken up over several years.

We actually had one clown give us an estimate of $65K for the system and tried to sell us on the "saving the planet" BS. Every contractor/installer will tell you the same thing, the government kicks in 30% of the cost (and you wonder why the cost is outrageous?!).


We just installed a 7KW system in CT in Dec. Cost was $29k & after CT & Fed incentives our cost was $12K. We used SolarWorld panels & PowerOne inverters. Assuming my system lasts 25yrs, I figured I'd have a 6% annual ROI if electric rates rise 1 cent per yr for the next 25 yrs. I factored in replacing the inverters once, removal/replacement of the panels once & an output loss of 1%/yr. Solar requires the incentives to be worth the cost. The warranty on most panels is 25 yrs, but have a lifespan of 30-40 yrs (depending on manufacturer). SolarCity is a large company using many different panel brands. Be sure you know what brands of panel, inverter & mounts they will use. Almost every panel manufacturer is financially stressed right now, so the 25 yr warranty might be moot. Try to select a manufacturer with a proven track record of quality. If you choose Sunpower panels, they use a positive ground. That's ok unless they go out of business & you need to replace the panel sometime in the future with a different manufacturer - all of which use a negative ground. Get MANY quotes. I had quotes for similar systems varying by $15k. I also did not factor in an increase in home value. Some buyers will not like the fact that they'll have the cost to replace the inverters or have to pay extra for the roof replacement. Other buyers will be happy that the electric bill is minimal. If you decide you will lease the panels, do some research to be sure it will not impact your (or a future buyer's) ability to get a mortgage. Supposedly some are running into issues trying to refi if they are leasing a roof-mounted array.

Government should stop subsidizing green energy. That will make the newer technologies more affordable. Subsidy, like insurance causes inflation.
For example compare costs involved in laser surgery (with no insurance coverage) with a regular blood test (with ins coverage).
Edit: Laser Surgery == Lasik surgery - Laser surgery to correct vision which is under $500.

hasu said:   Government should stop subsidizing green energy. That will make the newer technologies more affordable. Subsidy, like insurance causes inflation.
For example compare costs involved in laser surgery (with no insurance coverage) with a regular blood test (with ins coverage).


BINGO! That is why I mentioned the contractor, 30% scam. You are 100% right.

BamBam0099, thanks for the info. It will take time for solar to be cost effective. What is needed is more competition and less government. Heck, I designed my first solar collector twenty years ago for our pool. Just some free glass, homemade plywood box and the pool hose running thru it to make the pool warmer.

Here in Florida Progress Energy says we do not have enough clear sun light in Florida to make solar energy possible.
This is why we call it FLORIDAH

Direct sunshine does absolutely equate to more solar power.

Direct sunlight is 10x more powerful than an overcast sky, that means far more energy. It's true heat does cut back the output, but still more sun is more sun, even if you lose a bit to heat.

Here is a system in Los Altos, California.

https://enlighten.enphaseenergy.com/public/systems/bUUu999

You can that Feb 18th and Feb 19th were cloudy.

On the 17th, a clear day, the system produced 20.2kWh.
On the 18th, a cloudy day, the system produced 8.11kWh.
On the 19th, a cloudy day, the system produced 6.85kWh.
On the 20th, a clear day, the system produced 21.2kWh.

You do the math.

As to why Germany produces so much solar, it's because they have a massive solar subsidy. Electricity is already expensive there, about $0.34/kWh, and $0.055 of that goes as a subsidy to clean energy. If you have a solar array, you can get paid $0.30/kWh for what you generate (this is called a feed-in tariff), even if you use it yourself. And if you use it yourself, you don't pay for it, so the net can be you make $0.60/kWh!

http://www.spiegel.de/international/germany/consumers-bear-brunt...

http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/02/19/column-wynn-german-ren...

That's why they have a lot of solar. Expensive power and a lot of subsidy. It isn't because they have a lot of Insolation. In the area the above system is, the average insolation is about 5.4kW/m^2/day. In the southern part of Germany, the insolation is only about 3.14kW/m^2/day.

Both places have expensive electricity, that and a relatively small subsidy is why you can have a profitable solar system in Los Altos, California (the system above). But in Germany, electricity is much more expensive and the subsidies much higher, so despite being not all that great in terms of sun (insolation), it is profitable to run a solar system. A place like Texas which seems like an obvious win for solar due to high insolation has to put in a huge subsidy to make up for the low retail price of electricity and make solar work.

I can see it now at the Honda dealerships...

... Would you like solar with that?

Caution: Solar panels keep getting cheaper. There's a reason why Solyndra went bankrupt. Within 5-10 years, everyone will be buying solar... meanwhile the SolarCity customers will be paying through the nose for solar panels (or rather, solar power pre-paid) that they can't get rid of.

I think SolarCity will become loathed by their customers in the coming years... and basically a bill/debt collector on past installs. That is, if they don't go BK themselves first.

Looks like a good thing for someone to have installed right before bankruptcy. You can discharge your obligation to pay them anything, and enjoy your free solar energy forever.

vipercon said:   Looks like a good thing for someone to have installed right before bankruptcy. You can discharge your obligation to pay them anything, and enjoy your free solar energy forever.

I don't think it's yours until some point in the future (if then). Until then, you don't own it, you just have use of it. Filing for bankruptcy won't make it yours, it'll just end your obligation to buy electricity from them.

Red55, Could you please give some more details on how to build that solar box, etc. My husband buys those black solar pool heater
( whatever you call em), and if we get really strong winds, it blows them loose. Not often, but we had to purchase another set, and it can
be expensive.

Skipping 20 Messages...
then the excess is fed back to the grid so your electronics are not overloaded and burnt out.

Your devices use what they need. They won't burn out from excess. If that was the case everything in your house would be burned out from the 200 Amp feed into the house from the utility company. Electricity waits in the grid until you use it. It is fed back into the grid from solar systems so the excess you are generating from solar doesn't go to waste, and you can sell it to the power company to offset your night power usage costs and hopefully make a profit to pay for the system.

D



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