• Page :
  • 1
  • Text Only
Voting History
rated:
Hey, at least it's in stock. Shipping for my address is $15.00.

http://palmettostatearmory.com/index.php/featured/smith-wesson-s...

Thanks to my Dad who emailed me this deal.

Member Summary

smith & wesson
Thanks BMWLVR82
Disclaimer
Most Recent Posts
I laugh when someone says you need a source for spare parts for a Smith & Wesson. They come with the best warranty avai... (more)

JasonBargain (Feb. 25, 2013 @ 11:36a) |

Lough as long as you want. But I will see how loud you lough is going to be when you lose for example "Firing Pin Spacer... (more)

Stas1976 (Feb. 25, 2013 @ 11:49a) |

Guns are like cars... everyone has a better, faster, and more expensive one. Getting an honest review or opinion is near... (more)

ZombieHunter (Feb. 25, 2013 @ 2:34p) |

Thanks for visiting FatWallet.com. Join for free to remove this ad.

Does it come with a free trigger job?

I wouldn't recommend this gun.

Richardito said:   I wouldn't recommend this gun.

That was informative Care to elaborate?

Can't go wrong with a S&W

daveem said:   Richardito said:   I wouldn't recommend this gun.

That was informative Care to elaborate?
This gun kind of has the reputation of having a lousy trigger from the factory...

It looks like a nice gun, not sure what the guts are but mag capacity is nice for a 10mm plus it seems to have a rail to maintain tactical stuff under the receiver. 350$ makes it a deal. But again do your homework. I would personally check few things

1. Can you buy magazines for it. Is any market for them around.
2. Can you buy nightlights from Truglo, Trijicon or another reputable brand. Is any instruction videos on youtube how to install them.
3. Can you find a replacement firing pin on eBay. Just in case if ever need one.

If answers are yes, it might be a good deal indeed.

Stas1976 said:   It looks like a nice gun, not sure what the guts are but mag capacity is nice for a 10mm plus it seems to have a rail to maintain tactical stuff under the receiver. 350$ makes it a deal. But again do your homework. I would personally check few things

1. Can you buy magazines for it. Is any market for them around.
2. Can you buy nightlights from Truglo, Trijicon or another reputable brand. Is any instruction videos on youtube how to install them.
3. Can you find a replacement firing pin on eBay. Just in case if ever need one.

If answers are yes, it might be a good deal indeed.


It's the S&W Glock knockoff. -1
It's a .40(not 10mm) .40 is a stretched 9mm. Brings nothing special to the table. -1

Stas1976 said:   It looks like a nice gun, not sure what the guts are but mag capacity is nice for a 10mm plus it seems to have a rail to maintain tactical stuff under the receiver. 350$ makes it a deal. But again do your homework. I would personally check few things

1. Can you buy magazines for it. Is any market for them around.
2. Can you buy nightlights from Truglo, Trijicon or another reputable brand. Is any instruction videos on youtube how to install them.
3. Can you find a replacement firing pin on eBay. Just in case if ever need one.

If answers are yes, it might be a good deal indeed.


Just checked.
- Night sights are costly Trijicon SA137O is going for 145$ on eBay. TRUGLO does not offer anything for this gun.
- Firing pin is not available on eBay. Not necessary you will ever need one but this is an indication that it might be hard to find any parts for this gun. And no matter what people say there are replaceable parts that you might need for every handgun. Recoil spring alone should be replaced after few thousand rounds or at least considered to be replaced. Zero availability for this gun.
- Magazines availability is sparse. Only one offeringon GunBroker and it is 10 rounds.

skansiewicz said:   It's a .40(not 10mm) .40 is a stretched 9mm. Brings nothing special to the table. -1

Well, actually, I'd say a .40 is a 9mm that needs a diet, since it's fatter, not longer.

MarvKaboom said:   skansiewicz said:   It's a .40(not 10mm) .40 is a stretched 9mm. Brings nothing special to the table. -1

Well, actually, I'd say a .40 is a 9mm that needs a diet, since it's fatter, not longer.


Just be careful if you have both, because it's not that much faster.

Personally, not a fan of the S&W SD's (any caliber).
For $10 more at $360, The Kahr CW40 is a FAR better alternative in .40 than the SD: Kahr CW40

Pops

skansiewicz said:   Stas1976 said:   It looks like a nice gun, not sure what the guts are but mag capacity is nice for a 10mm plus it seems to have a rail to maintain tactical stuff under the receiver. 350$ makes it a deal. But again do your homework. I would personally check few things

1. Can you buy magazines for it. Is any market for them around.
2. Can you buy nightlights from Truglo, Trijicon or another reputable brand. Is any instruction videos on youtube how to install them.
3. Can you find a replacement firing pin on eBay. Just in case if ever need one.

If answers are yes, it might be a good deal indeed.


It's the S&W Glock knockoff. -1
It's a .40(not 10mm) .40 is a stretched 9mm. Brings nothing special to the table. -1

skansiewicz said:   Stas1976 said:   It looks like a nice gun, not sure what the guts are but mag capacity is nice for a 10mm plus it seems to have a rail to maintain tactical stuff under the receiver. 350$ makes it a deal. But again do your homework. I would personally check few things

1. Can you buy magazines for it. Is any market for them around.
2. Can you buy nightlights from Truglo, Trijicon or another reputable brand. Is any instruction videos on youtube how to install them.
3. Can you find a replacement firing pin on eBay. Just in case if ever need one.

If answers are yes, it might be a good deal indeed.


It's the S&W Glock knockoff. -1
It's a .40(not 10mm) .40 is a stretched 9mm. Brings nothing special to the table. -1


Actually, the .40 caliber round is a 10mm with its case trimmed 1 centimeter shorter than a 10mm. The projectiles/bullets are exactly the same for a .40 caliber round as is for the 10mm. I worked on the development of the .40 caliber cartridge. The first designations considered for the .40 caliber round was going to be a 10mm short (since the case was 1 centimeter shorter than a 10 mm round, or the Centimeter (since the 10mm case was made 1 centimeter shorter, or a .40 S&W. The .40 S&W name for the .40 caliber round was selected because Smith & Wesson lobbied heavily to have the cartridge with a S&W designation - which S&W was successful in getting the cartridge named the .40 S&W due to their heavy lobbying with Winchester and because Smith & Wesson was the first firearms company to produce production firearms for the .40 caliber cartridge.

The first 10 barrels made/chambered in .40 caliber were for 1911 A1 handguns - of which I received 2 of the 10 barrels (made by famous barrel maker Bar-Sto barrels). I had 2 competition 1911 A1 pistols made with the two .40 caliber barrels from Bar-Sto and I was the first to shoot the .40 caliber pistols in a major competition - The Steel Challenge. Because the name of the .40 caliber round had not been officially decided when Bar-Sto barrels, the first 10 barrels Bar-Sto chambered for the .40 caliber round were marked as both 10mm Short & .40 S&W.

During the development of the .40 caliber round (which I worked with Winchester on as well as the smokeless gun powder loading data for the .40 caliber round). Until the round was developed by Winchester, I hand turned 10mm casings down 1 centimeter (along with a competitive shooter - Jim Zubiana ((Sp?). We called the cartridge the Centimeter, competed with it under that name with 10mm barrels short chambered by 1 Centimeter to accommodate the new round. When Winchester became involved in the development of the cartridge, they called is simply a .40 caliber round. I was thrilled to get their 1st .40 caliber brass from their pressure testing barrel - rather than having to turn each 10mm brass case down by 1 Centimeter on a lathe.

The reason the Centimeter/.40 caliber/.40 S&W round was developed was because the 10mm cartridge was so long that there were reliability issues with feeding the 10mm (long) round through 10mm semi-automatic handguns. It was discovered that by shortening the 10mm casing by 1 centimeter, feeding reliability improved dramatically. Now you probably know more about the .40 caliber round than you wanted to know. Other than bullet weights, the diameter of the 10mm & .40 caliber bullets are exactly the same.

As for Smith & Wesson semi-automatic handguns, I am not a fan. They do, however, make some excellent revolvers. BTW, and good gunsmith can perform a trigger job on semi-automatic or revolver pistols to make them match grade trigger jobs. I am also a gunsmith but I am not accepting any new business.

The .40 caliber round is not a stretched 9mm. It is the same bullet that a 10mm uses, however the .40 caliber case is a shortened 10mm case and does not have the same power as a 10mm cartridge (due to pressure reasons). It would be fair to say that a .40 caliber round is more powerful than a 9mm and less powerful than a 10mm - it is approximately between the 2 (power wise). A .45 ACP could not rightfully be compared among these calibers - 9mm/.40 Caliber/10mm). The .45 ACP is in a completely class than these 3 cartridges/calibers. Just so you know.

JR

Excellent info Randolphjo.

I would add ... the 10mm fanboys call the 40S&W the 40 Short & Weak.

I have an earlier version of this pistol in 40 S&W. It has been reliable and surprisingly accurate dispite the terrible trigger. That being said, it's my least favorite of the handguns that I own. I also have a S&W M&P and it, too, is reliable and accurate. It is one of my favorite handguns.

Not a bad price and in stock. This is the new version of the S&W 'sigma' polymer, a budget offering in the S&W lineup. I also have the earlier version. The only negative I've found is a long, somewhat heavy trigger pull. Very reliable and accurate with all types of ammo from what I've seen using it. That being said, supposedly the improvement in the new generation model is the improved trigger. Haven't tried this new version myself but if the trigger is improved I would say it would likely be a great gun for the price range.

I heard another story why FBI asked to develop .40 cartridge. 9 mm did not have enough stopping power and 10 mm had too strong recoil for female agents. So they asked to find a compromise.

daveem said:   Richardito said:   I wouldn't recommend this gun.

That was informative Care to elaborate?


Anyone that knows anything about guns already knows that this cheap model from S&W is nothing special and that most other guns in the market are much better than this one. Make sure you fire the gun that you are planning on buying at your local range. If it is a deal and you hate it and not use it then it is not a deal anymore, right? People should just stop posting so called "deals" for this POS handgun...

Randolphjo,
I enjoyed the history lesson. Are you sure that the 40 case is one centimeter shorter than the 10 mm? From what I found, the 40 case length is 21.59 mm and the 10 mm case length is 25.15 mm. The OAL for the 40 is 28.83 mm and the OAL for the 10mm is 32.00. I'm confused where the 1 centimeter difference is coming from. That said, I agree with your assessment that the 40 sits between the 9 and 10 power-wise.

Many innovations regarding improvements in firearms, calibers and accessories have come from the competitive shooting community. - primarily from a competitive shooting style practiced by IPSC (International Practical Shooting Community) competitors. Google them on the web and if you get a chance to see a competitor shooting a Match Stage, do so. It will appear that the competitor is shooting so fast among various obstacles that you might be tempted to believe that they are "spraying and praying" with their shots, however I assure you that accuracy is the primary focus. Their motto in Latin "DVC" stands (in order) for Accuracy, Power then Speed. Accuracy comes first because a fast miss is still a miss.

Many have biases regarding their favorite firearms, firearm calibers and such - but truth be told, there is no single perfect one of any. Those who hold such biases will likely not be swayed by facts, logic or reason. I have tried many times to change such views and met with little - if any - success. Pour as much water on a stone as you care to but don't expect much - if any to soak in. A preference is not remotely the same as a bias. We all have our personal preferences, however, we don't put the other person down if theirs differ from ours. That, to me, is the difference between bias and preference.


To Stas1976:

The .40 caliber round was not developed by the FBI. I posted above the origins of the .40 caliber round. The FBI (as well as most every Law Enforcement agency) took a look at the .40 caliber round to determine if the .40 caliber had traits beneficial to them, such as stopping power, magazine capacity, firearms chambered in the .40 caliber round, however, I assure you that the FBI did not have anything to do with the development of the .40 caliber cartridge (again, read my first post above for the history of the origins of the .40 caliber round. My information was not obtained by hearsay - but direct personal experience in helping to develop the round. Winchester Arms can confirm my account as I wrote above.


To XRay:

The information I posted is accurate. With Winchester Arms' interested in this new cartridge, unknown to me, my shooting "buddy" went behind my back and was seeking a patent on the case I developed and he named. In his patent application he was calling the new round the "Centimeter"..As the .40 caliber round was undergoing further development at Winchester Arms, and in order to avoid a potential Patent Infringement lawsuit, certain changes had to be addressed with regard to the .40 caliber cartridge.

The .40 caliber case was made shorter than 1 centimeter trimmed off of a 10mm case), the primer was changed to a small pistol primer (rather than the large pistol primer the 10mm cartridge has) and the internal case "web" was made shorter than the one in the 10mm case. Had it not been for my former "friend" who had little to do with the new .40 caliber round, the .40 S&W cartridge might have been named "The Centimeter" instead. His contribution to the development of the "centimeter" cartridge was that he came up with the name "Centimeter" for the round. The rest of the development I did and later I worked with Winchester Arms on the development and ballistics of what is now the .40 S&W cartridge. I also loaned my pair of 1911 A1 .40 caliber pistols to Winchester for ballistics testing and just to have fun shooting. I did not ask for any compensation for my assistance to Winchester Arms. They sent me a nice letter and 1000 rounds of the first commercial loading of the .40 S&W rounds.

Originally, I had not planned to get too involved with my posts about the .40 S&W cartridge, however, I wanted to dispel some myths and misinformation regarding this cartridge. I also wanted to let you know why the .40 caliber brass dimensions were no longer 1 centimeter shorter than a 10mm case.



BTW, to those who think that the .40 caliber round was developed so that women could handle the recoil, guess again. The .40 caliber round has better stopping power than a 9mm, most Law Enforcement agencies banned the use of Duty 1911 A1 handguns (chambered in .45 ACP) and the .40 caliber cartridge was suitable for high capacity magazines. H&K has chambered some of their MP5 line in .40 Caliber as well, and the feedback I have received is that the .40 caliber MP5's are a bit hit with the officers and agents who use MP5's. My last word will be on recoil. Recoil has an effect on every shooter. The more recoil you have to deal with, the slower your shot to shot recovery will be and hard recoiling firearms have a detrimental effect on your accuracy. DVC Enjoy shooting and always keep it safe.

JR.


editedto add: IPSC stands for "International Shooting Confederation". Confederation NOT Community as I listed above. I tried twice to edit the IPSC CORRECT NAME ABOVE, HOWEVER, i WAS UNABLE TO EDIT OUT "Community". I encourage you to check them out on the web - particularly any Match shooting videos. It is quite impressive.

Lots of misinfo about the SD40VE here. Let's try to set the record straight, since we're doing history lessons.

After Glock started taking away S&W's law-enforcement sales in the early 1990s, S&W introduced a semi-automatic pistol called the Sigma. The pistol was met with very mixed reviews, and Glock quickly sued S&W over several patent infringement issues. The lawsuit was settled out of court, with Glock clearly the winner: S&W was forced to redesign the Sigma. The redesigned, second generaton Sigma ("Sigma Enhanched") came out in 1999. Overcoming the poor reputation of the original Sigma was no easy task. The new pistol, with a low price point and very good overall quality, did re-establish itself, but it took a long time and a low price point. Reliability of these guns is excellent, as are the ergonomics and potential accuracy. I say "potential accuracy" because the gun's biggest weakness was a long, spongy, heavy double action trigger pull. It could be mastered, with practice, but it put a lot of people off. That trigger, along with the negative associated with the original Sigma name, kept the pistol from enjoying the better reputation it should have had. Still, the low price point and rebate promotions by S&W did generate heavy sales and the pistol did reasonably well in the marketplace as S&W's entry-level semi-auto.

Fast forward another decade, and S&W polymer, semi-auto pistols are basically marketed as three tiers: Sigma, SD, and M&P. The M&P line was S&W's high end polymer pistol, marketed against the Glock for government sales. The SD line was, effectively, a third generation Sigma with a better trigger and night signts, priced in between the enhanced Sigma and the M&P line.

Recently, S&W began phasing out the Sigma line, with the "Sigma SD" replacing it; basically the SD line without the night sights. It seems that S&W is now starting to drop the Sigma name, and the gun is going to be marketed as the SD. That's the gun we're discussing in this thread.

Bottom line: This is a very well made gun, with 20 years of refinements behind it. People continue to hold onto decades-old prejudices, developed against the original Sigma line. People who know these guns from hands-on use understand that is simply not reality.

rbstern said:   Lots of misinfo about the SD40VE here. Let's try to set the record straight, since we're doing history lessons.

After Glock started taking away S&W's law-enforcement sales in the early 1990s, S&W introduced a semi-automatic pistol called the Sigma. The pistol was met with very mixed reviews, and Glock quickly sued S&W over several patent infringement issues. The lawsuit was settled out of court, with Glock clearly the winner: S&W was forced to redesign the Sigma. The redesigned, second generaton Sigma ("Sigma Enhanched") came out in 1999. Overcoming the poor reputation of the original Sigma was no easy task. The new pistol, with a low price point and very good overall quality, did re-establish itself, but it took a long time and a low price point. Reliability of these guns is excellent, as are the ergonomics and potential accuracy. I say "potential accuracy" because the gun's biggest weakness was a long, spongy, heavy double action trigger pull. It could be mastered, with practice, but it put a lot of people off. That trigger, along with the negative associated with the original Sigma name, kept the pistol from enjoying the better reputation it should have had. Still, the low price point and rebate promotions by S&W did generate heavy sales and the pistol did reasonably well in the marketplace as S&W's entry-level semi-auto.

Fast forward another decade, and S&W polymer, semi-auto pistols are basically marketed as three tiers: Sigma, SD, and M&P. The M&P line was S&W's high end polymer pistol, marketed against the Glock for government sales. The SD line was, effectively, a third generation Sigma with a better trigger and night signts, priced in between the enhanced Sigma and the M&P line.

Recently, S&W began phasing out the Sigma line, with the "Sigma SD" replacing it; basically the SD line without the night sights. It seems that S&W is now starting to drop the Sigma name, and the gun is going to be marketed as the SD. That's the gun we're discussing in this thread.

Bottom line: This is a very well made gun, with 20 years of refinements behind it. People continue to hold onto decades-old prejudices, developed against the original Sigma line. People who know these guns from hands-on use understand that is simply not reality.


+1.

I laugh when I hear folks refer to the Sigma as a POS. I teach pistol and have a couple of Sigmas (The SW9VE, not the SD for sale in this thread) available as "loaner" pistols for the course. Students using them have ranged from experienced shooters to novices. These guns have fired many thousands of rounds in all kinds of weather (including below freezing) and I have never had a single malfunction of any kind from either Pistol. Not a single one.

The trigger is not the best out of the box and it will never be as good as the trigger on on a 1911 (or many other pistols) but with use it does get better. The Sigma is a very reliable and accurate pistol. The SD listed here is an improved version. A good pistol for the price.

Thanks for the informative thread guys.

I posted this because it is an inexpensive, made in the US with a good warranty, AVAILABLE pistol that is $50 off of "regular" price. It should be obvious that a $350 gun won't be in the same class as a $550 Glock but it's a decent entry level gun that is in stock. The Kahr that ekeith posted about looks interesting but has no rail, for those that are interested in that feature.

And from the posts I've read here it doesn't sound like a bad deal. I didn't buy it, I have a 92M, a Glock 17, and an old Taurus 9mm, but I'm getting ready to branch out.

I laugh when someone says you need a source for spare parts for a Smith & Wesson. They come with the best warranty available. Full Warranty, no matter if you are the first or later owner. If they don't have a part, they'll make it right. Best service in the business.

JasonBargain said:   I laugh when someone says you need a source for spare parts for a Smith & Wesson. They come with the best warranty available. Full Warranty, no matter if you are the first or later owner. If they don't have a part, they'll make it right. Best service in the business.

Lough as long as you want. But I will see how loud you lough is going to be when you lose for example "Firing Pin Spacer Sleeve" (a small little piece of plastic). You probably even have not seen one because never stripped your handgun for little pieces. Do you think somebody would give it to you for free just because you were unlucky enough to lose it. And a lot of people do during cleaning. Or they will give you a recoil spring because you wish it be replaced every 3 thousand rounds ? It costs 10$ for Glock. Not a big deal to buy it as a part of regular maintenance but for S&W you will call their office and beg to send you a new one. Good luck with that "mister lough". Not to say that none of you seems to be concern that there is no magazines available and night sights costs at least 2 times more as for Glock.

Guns are like cars... everyone has a better, faster, and more expensive one. Getting an honest review or opinion is nearly impossible.. kinda like the mob mentality, just pile on. There are not too many unreliable guns on the market anymore, and this one certainly is not unreliable or junk. It is a decent gun for a decent price.



Disclaimer: By providing links to other sites, FatWallet.com does not guarantee, approve or endorse the information or products available at these sites, nor does a link indicate any association with or endorsement by the linked site to FatWallet.com.

Thanks for visiting FatWallet.com. Join for free to remove this ad.

TRUSTe online privacy certification

While FatWallet makes every effort to post correct information, offers are subject to change without notice.
Some exclusions may apply based upon merchant policies.
© 1999-2014