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ASUS Z77 + Intel I5 2500K processor + Kingston 8GB DDR3 HyperX Red memory module + Evga GTX650 Video Card + Seagate 1TB HDD + Samsung 24x DVDRW + Ult 750W PSU + Thermaltake Case Bund: http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/searchtools/item-details...

I think this is the relative reasonable quad core bundles. I want to change a better computer. I can play bf3.

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Seems a bit high if you are just upgrading. If you spec it out with your own choice of components you might be able to do better. I would ditch the HDD for an SSD, optical drive isn't need anymore these days. None the less nice find for someone who wants a quick bundle to build from scratch

Just make sure you are ok with the GTX650 if your objective is to "game" on this machine. I know nothing about it in particular, but would be cautious about taking whatever random card is included in a bundle considering how important the video card is in a gaming machine.

i5-2500K is 32nm generation CPU (Sandy Bridge), a full generation behind the 22nm Ivy Bridge version (i5-3570K). The latter eats less power, has higher benchmark scores and much better on-chip graphics.

If you're going to spend $600+ on a rig now, there's no reason to go with the 2500k. Go for the 3570K or the Xeon V2 (E3-1240 V2 or Xeon E3-1230 V2).

foghorn19 said:   i5-2500K is 32nm generation CPU (Sandy Bridge), a full generation behind the 22nm Ivy Bridge version (i5-3570K). The latter eats less power, has higher benchmark scores and much better on-chip graphics.

If you're going to spend $600+ on a rig now, there's no reason to go with the 2500k. Go for the 3570K or the Xeon V2 (E3-1240 V2 or Xeon E3-1230 V2).


I don't know if I would call it a "full generation" behind. It's not like the difference between Nehalem and Sandy Bridge. Those I would consider a full generation apart, because they were a different micro-architecture.

Ivy Bridge is just a 22nm shrink of Sandy Bridge (for the most part, other than the slightly-improved IGP). Sure, it uses less power, but it also runs hotter and is harder to overclock as high, due to the properties of the new 22nm process, as well as Intel's choice to stop soldering on the IHS, but instead, to use TIM, which results in a hotter CPU.

IMO, I would prefer SB.

If you decide to later upgrade the GPU, you'll find that the hard drives intrude into the expansion card space. This could restrict the maximum usable length of a graphics card to only 10 inches long if a hard drive is installed in one of the upper bays in the hard drive cage. This makes that case a poor choice for a multi-GPU configuration if you need it.



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