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ColonelCash said:   I wonder how many lamp manufactures are going to stick with the standard bulb sicket going forward? I'm seeing a lot of ceiling / wall lights that are going to a candleabra / alternate socket fitting that would render these bulbs useless if you replaced your lamps.

I wonder if the trend might not reverse. Candelabra's don't lend themselves to alternate bulbs easily. What really gets my goat is that a lot of outdoor fixtures exactly where you might most want to use LED or CFL are very hard to find in non candelabra sockets. That said I really wonder if one will still want to use today's LEDs in 5-10 years when the new ones are $2.00 or less and have 3x the efficiency. I have a number of LEDs but I don't take their 20+ year lifespan into much account. Heck I might move houses and not need the reflector LEDs I have now. Buy because you like their qualities today and are willing to pay a premium and/or because they will pay back within five years or less. I wouldn't bank on using them in two decades in most instances.

To/From candelabra adapters are available. I got some a few months ago. However, the added adapter length sometimes makes the regular-socket CFLs/LEDs stick out of the fixtures/chandelair.

Can it be used in countries with 220/240 Volt electrical outlet?

I wonder if they will start making them in T5 tube sizes for undercabinet use. I'm replacing my kitchen bulbs at $6 each once a year

jeffd said:   Kaadamson said:   Here's a recent and informative article on Cree: http://www.newsobserver.com/2013/03/05/2727881/cree-unveils-10-l...

Thanks for the link.



HappyScrappyHeroPup said:   This bulb looks like a good bulb for use in garages, etc. But at an 80 CRI it doesn't have the best quality of light. If you are using an LED in a place where you at all concerned about color rendition (bathrooms, perhaps living/familiy/den where you spend a lot of time) you might be better off with the slightly more expensive Philips and its 90 CRI.

I'm going to get one for sure to check the dimmability, because CREEs claims for dimmer compatibility are extraordinary.

Note, this isn't actually a hot deal, these are list prices. Great list prices though.


HappyScrappyHeroPup, which of the Philips are you talking about? Is that the new L-Class bulb? I didn't think the standard 12.5W 2700K (which is under $15) has those specs. The L-Class bulb retails close to $30.


In that case I was talking about the "cheap" Philips. The L Prize Bulb is much more expensive, it's CRI is 92 or 93 I think.

I'm not sure where I read it, but I think this year's "cheap" Philips is CRI 90. That's the one that looks like an L-Prize but with white phosphor instead of yellow.

mcpagano said:   Here's another advantage of LED bulbs - bugs are not attracted to LED light since there really isn't a UV component. So the CREE bulb is perfect for your front or back porch as it won't attract a bunch of bugs. Please note you would want the warm white not the daylight version.

You must have different bugs than we do in the midwest, I use LED Lanterns for night fishing and the bugs swarm around it the same as they do with any other light I've used.

LLLosingit said:   mcpagano said:   Here's another advantage of LED bulbs - bugs are not attracted to LED light since there really isn't a UV component. So the CREE bulb is perfect for your front or back porch as it won't attract a bunch of bugs. Please note you would want the warm white not the daylight version.

You must have different bugs than we do in the midwest, I use LED Lanterns for night fishing and the bugs swarm around it the same as they do with any other light I've used.


Off topic, but I think yellow LEDs are better for avoiding bugs. Our backyard lamp is normally white LEDs, but if the bugs get too bad, I can switch it to yellow LEDs and they lose interest. Not completely of course, but noticeable. Maybe try covering your LED lantern with yellow cellophane or a light coat of yellow paint?

jcantanixon said:   LLLosingit said:   mcpagano said:   Here's another advantage of LED bulbs - bugs are not attracted to LED light since there really isn't a UV component. So the CREE bulb is perfect for your front or back porch as it won't attract a bunch of bugs. Please note you would want the warm white not the daylight version.

You must have different bugs than we do in the midwest, I use LED Lanterns for night fishing and the bugs swarm around it the same as they do with any other light I've used.


Off topic, but I think yellow LEDs are better for avoiding bugs. Our backyard lamp is normally white LEDs, but if the bugs get too bad, I can switch it to yellow LEDs and they lose interest. Not completely of course, but noticeable. Maybe try covering your LED lantern with yellow cellophane or a light coat of yellow paint?


Where did you get a bulb which has both white and yellow LEDs in it?

Yellow cellophane won't work probably as it isn't selective enough. It'll also get too hot. Paint is an even worse idea, paint blocks all light transmission equally. Yellow paint just reflects yellow preferentially.

Also, even if you reproduce a "bug bulb" ability, you'll notice it only works on some bugs. This may be why some on here report yellow LEDs attract bugs and others say they don't.

Haha, well like half of my purchases, I think it was a posted deal here. I called it a backyard light, but it's really an umbrella light. Anyway, here's the link from Home Depot. http://www.homedepot.com/p/Rite-Lite-40-LED-Outdoor-Bronze-Umbre...

You're probably right about the paint and cellophane, but I'm not sure heat is an issue. I've got a few different LED lanterns and they all seem cool to the touch even after being on for hours.

can someone who gets one of these bulbs report back if the bulb is suitable for enclosed fixtures? i search the cree website and could not find if these new bulbs are suitable for completely enclosed fixtures.

mcpagano said:   Here's another advantage of LED bulbs - bugs are not attracted to LED light since there really isn't a UV component. So the CREE bulb is perfect for your front or back porch as it won't attract a bunch of bugs. Please note you would want the warm white not the daylight version.

Why? Just curious

Here's the article I read about LED's and bugs. As I said before, you can't get the daylight bulb since it has the UV component

Link

very glad to see cree in the bulb business, they have really helped in lowering flashlight prices that were crazy. off topic but since so many have referenced energy saving when Kmart (old deal) clearanced these power strips for 10 dollars I bought all they had power strip with remote

this has been my number one energy saver product, no deal on it now but I have saved alot on this devise

biggus35 said:   Replaced every incadescent bulb in my house about a year ago with CFL. No savings on electric bill...it actually went up!. It's all marketing hype.

Also I've had 5 of the CFLs die during the year that I've had them...so much for the long life crap the marketing department talks about. I've replaced them with incadescents and the first time you switch the incadescents on you realize how poor the light from the CFLs really was. I just replaced a CFL in my kitchen with an incadescent and it's like I have a new kitchen!

I think I'll buy a couple of these LEDs just to test them before committing to a total swap out again. Might cut down on how hard the A/C has to work in the Summer.

Thanks OP!


It's hard to understand this. There is no doubt that CFLs consume about 25% of the energy of an incandescent. Either you are lying or you are suffering from gross measurement error (perhaps you just started consuming a lot more energy elsewhere to compensate).

I too have had CFL bulbs die, but they don't die nearly as often as incandescents. As for the light quality, it depends on the CFL. You are conditioned to expect "warm" light as opposed to "cool" (white/blue) light. Most CFLs tend toward the latter, but not all of them. You can get warm CFLs that look very similar to incandescents.

jimmybgood said:   mcpagano said:   Here's another advantage of LED bulbs - bugs are not attracted to LED light since there really isn't a UV component. So the CREE bulb is perfect for your front or back porch as it won't attract a bunch of bugs. Please note you would want the warm white not the daylight version.

Why? Just curious


As I understand it bugs sensitivity to light is shifted toward blue and ultra violet. This is why, at least in my experience bugs are more attracted to CFLs (which have UV output) than to LEDs (basically no UV) or incandescent (some UV but less than CFL). The reason you'd want a 2600k ("warn white") vs a 5000k ("daylight") bulb is that the 5000k bulb output will be shifted more the blue end of the spectrum than 2600k bulb. Basically 2600k looks yellow white while 5000k will look more like blue white. Thus 2600k, in theory should be somewhat less interesting than a 5000k bulb to bugs. As always I suspect YMMV.

My kitchen and dining room are on the south side second floor of my house. Due to a poorly designed and underpowered HVAC plus old windows the summer temperatures would reach into the mid 80s in these two adjoined room. My initial solution was install an additional minisplit AC unit at a cost of about $2500. (How American of me? throw more power at it)

Upon moving in:
6 - Can lights @ 60w each
6 - Dining Chandelier lights @ 60w each
2 - Range hood lights @ 50w each
2 - Over sink @ 50w each
6 - Under Cabinet @ 50w each
Total potential lighting load: 1220w

Reworked:
6 - Can lights @ 16w each (CFL)
6 - Dining Chandelier lights @ 9w each (LED)
2 - Range hood lights @ 9w each (LED)
2 - Over sink @ 50w each (have yet to find suitable replacement)
6 - Under Cabinet @ 50w each (plan to LED)
New total potential lighting load: 568w

Shedding 652w of heat load combined with a slight HVAC return air mod and the temperatures rarely exceed 80. Rarely would we run all the lights, but now I don't have to micro-manage the family by following them around shutting off lights. Low-E windows are on deck for this spring.

The point is that there are sometimes reasons other than watt-for-watt savings that can yield significant returns.

hpmax said:   

It's hard to understand this. There is no doubt that CFLs consume about 25% of the energy of an incandescent. Either you are lying or you are suffering from gross measurement error (perhaps you just started consuming a lot more energy elsewhere to compensate).



It actually doesn't surprise me, I have seen various figured quoted for the amount of end-user electricity usage and it is usually in the 5-10% range in the US (so pretty small amount really). And that is the average, if you are like me and have electric dryer, electric hot water heater (mine is now a heat pump "hybrid" version), two electric heat pumps (one with natural gas back up the other with electric resistance heat), and electric for cooking, then lighting makes up even a smaller percentage of overall usage. I run all CFLs and LEDs and the change was noticeable in my bills only comparing an entire year over an entire year (month to month was mostly noise) it was about a 2% drop year over year (easily lost in the noise if you are not paying attention). In any given month the average temperature swings have more impact on my usage because both summer and winter my heat pumps/AC units are the major consumers of electricity. I'd guess he is saving money, he has to be but it is probably lost in the noise

The other thing folks forget is that when the price of something drops you tend to consume more of it. I have noticed when I converted to CFLs and LEDs I tended to upgrade my overall light output (usually by adding more bulbs and/or brighter ones) since my cost per lumen had dropped. This tends to reduce my savings as well. There was a study I saw that showed I think that something like 30%+ of the savings of more efficient bulbs was lost to upgrades in overall light output (this was across consumers and industry).

LLLosingit said:   mcpagano said:   Here's another advantage of LED bulbs - bugs are not attracted to LED light since there really isn't a UV component. So the CREE bulb is perfect for your front or back porch as it won't attract a bunch of bugs. Please note you would want the warm white not the daylight version.

You must have different bugs than we do in the midwest, I use LED Lanterns for night fishing and the bugs swarm around it the same as they do with any other light I've used.


Funny

mcpagano said:   Here's another advantage of LED bulbs - bugs are not attracted to LED light since there really isn't a UV component. So the CREE bulb is perfect for your front or back porch as it won't attract a bunch of bugs. Please note you would want the warm white not the daylight version.So, does anyone know if these make decent grow light? I thought the best one are the "full-spectrum" light but I really don't want to pay that much $.

handyguy said:   vanheve2 said:   dodotion said:   why would anyone pay this price for a lightbulb,,the old time "good bulbs are 25 cents a piece..i stocked up for a lifetime...
New Bulbs
old time "good bulbs

My condo has about 30 bulbs in it (a large house could have 60+).
"Old" bulbs cost $7/year, for $210 a year.
"New" bulbs cost $1/year, for $30 a year.

Yearly savings: $180
Savings over 10 years: $1,800
Initial cost: $390
New bulbs have an estimated life of: 22.8 years
Even if the new bulbs die 1/2 way through their life, your "old time" bulbs will cost you $1,410 more to use.


But those new bulbs dim with time. Figure that into your equation.


All bulbs dim with time. including incandescent. They just don't say how much incandescents do it, they don't give the rating.

secstate said:   jimmybgood said:   mcpagano said:   Here's another advantage of LED bulbs - bugs are not attracted to LED light since there really isn't a UV component. So the CREE bulb is perfect for your front or back porch as it won't attract a bunch of bugs. Please note you would want the warm white not the daylight version.

Why? Just curious


As I understand it bugs sensitivity to light is shifted toward blue and ultra violet. This is why, at least in my experience bugs are more attracted to CFLs (which have UV output) than to LEDs (basically no UV) or incandescent (some UV but less than CFL). The reason you'd want a 2600k ("warn white") vs a 5000k ("daylight") bulb is that the 5000k bulb output will be shifted more the blue end of the spectrum than 2600k bulb. Basically 2600k looks yellow white while 5000k will look more like blue white. Thus 2600k, in theory should be somewhat less interesting than a 5000k bulb to bugs. As always I suspect YMMV.


White LEDs which are a blue emitter behind phosphor have large amounts of blue and ultra violet.

Does anyone have any idea how much energy it takes for an AC system to counter the heat produced by lets say 1000w of incandescents? Living in AZ and running the AC 6 months a year, I think I might recoup more of my initial cost from less heat being generated rather than the reduced energy usage for light. I imagine the energy an HVAC takes to counter 1000w of incadescents is at least double that, perhaps more as cooling is rather inefficient.

on AMAZON A better LED light bulb
Philips 422154 12.5-Watt A19 LED Light Bulb, Dimmable

under $25 including s/h

mcpagano said:   wjwj, yes they are producing bright white bulbs too. They call it Daylight which is 5,000 K and it cost $13.97
Bright white bulbs are 3500K and Daylight bulbs are 5000K,
so you are telling me that they will not be making Bright White bulbs?

Klauven said:   Does anyone have any idea how much energy it takes for an AC system to counter the heat produced by lets say 1000w of incandescents? Living in AZ and running the AC 6 months a year, I think I might recoup more of my initial cost from less heat being generated rather than the reduced energy usage for light. I imagine the energy an HVAC takes to counter 1000w of incadescents is at least double that, perhaps more as cooling is rather inefficient.

Actually, AC units are heat pumps pumping heat from the inside where it's pleasantly cool to the outside where it's unpleasantly hot. What we call heat pumps simply pump in the opposite direction - from the outside where it's cold to the inside where it's warm. The neat thing is that you don't pay for energy to somehow counteract the heat, like you would with Peltier effect cooling, you just have to pay for the energy to run the pump (compressor) and that's much less. How much it costs depends - efficiency and design of the system - temperature gradient between the inside and outside - duct leaks and convection losses and so much more.

As a rough guess, if you have a modern high efficiency system and run those 1000 watts of incandescents for four hours in the evening (that's 4 kilowatt hours) it may only take a tenth of that to pump it outside (0.4 kwh). With an older, less efficient design, leaky ducts and a particularly hot day, it might take as much as 1 kwh. In general, your biggest potential savings would be in replacing those incandescents with CFLs or LEDs and generating less heat to begin with, not the savings from the AC running less, but if you do the former, the latter is free gravy.

Good price for LED bulb, but at 800 lm, I would pass. I've used 850 lm LED bulbs before and they weren't bright enough. When I swapped them to 950 lm, definitely much better. So becareful that 800 lm might not be enough.

jimmybgood said:   Klauven said:   Does anyone have any idea how much energy it takes for an AC system to counter the heat produced by lets say 1000w of incandescents? Living in AZ and running the AC 6 months a year, I think I might recoup more of my initial cost from less heat being generated rather than the reduced energy usage for light. I imagine the energy an HVAC takes to counter 1000w of incadescents is at least double that, perhaps more as cooling is rather inefficient.

As a rough guess, if you have a modern high efficiency system and run those 1000 watts of incandescents for four hours in the evening (that's 4 kilowatt hours) it may only take a tenth of that to pump it outside (0.4 kwh). With an older, less efficient design, leaky ducts and a particularly hot day, it might take as much as 1 kwh. In general, your biggest potential savings would be in replacing those incandescents with CFLs or LEDs and generating less heat to begin with, not the savings from the AC running less, but if you do the former, the latter is free gravy.


Good explanation, but you have the efficiency figures wrong. An efficient A/C (15ish SEER) will be about 400% efficient. So it will take about 1kWh to move 4kWh of heat outside.

SEER is stupid because it is expressed in how many BTU you can move with a Watt-hour of power. COP is the smarter measure, it is BTU to move a BTU or Watts to move a Watt. COP is SEER divided by 3.4.

outtawhack said:   sendslim said:   our electric bill is lower by a third since switching to leds in december. our payback period is about ten months. thank you cree and Home Depot for bringing affordable led technology to the consumer.

How large is your home, what is your electric bill, and how many lights did you replace?

I recently replaced about 30 cans with CFL bulbs, installed about 12 new LED cans in my kitchen, replaced all my ceiling fixtures with LED bulbs, and just about all my fixtures with CFLs.

I have yet to see a significant decrease in my electric bill.


You should also look at how your home is heated. Use much electric heat? Any "efficiency" gained with better lighting is lost as less heat put off. Sure, a standard resistor based electric heater is terrible for efficiency, but some people still use them a lot.

I second using standard in the winter and CFL/LED in the summer. Where I live people would only use AC for 2 months anyway. In areas that are much hotter, getting less heat from your lighting will bring much greater savings.

Incandescent light bulbs are not efficient heaters. And before some joker says electric heat is 100% efficient, that doesn't mean it's cost effective. And besides, light bulbs heat up a lot of stuff you don't really care if you heat up, like your wallboard and ceiling.

Let me put it this way, a hairdryer is 100% efficient too. So is your electric stove. Yet you don't heat your house with either of them.

wjwj, I guess not. The other bulb is a soft white which is 2,700 K

.

thrunner said:   beatme said:   dodotion said:   why would anyone pay this price for a lightbulb,,the old time "good bulbs are 25 cents a piece..i stocked up for a lifetime...

sendslim said:   our electric bill is lower by a third since switching to leds in december. our payback period is about ten months.
Use incandescent in the winter, LED in the summer, you get to wipe down the bulbs twice a year, bulbs last twice as long, unless you drop them.


It is still winter here but we went swimming outdoors today and had the A/C on. Though it is true up north the extra heat from incandescent bulbs is not wasted, not everywhere has cold enough temps to matter.

Not available at my local Home Depot yet. Cree doesn't even have space in the bulb section yet. Every other make there has myriad incandescent and CFL offerings and so it's easy to find their bulbs, and their LED bulbs are near their other bulbs. Cree only sells LED bulbs, and so would only have 3 tiny slots on the huge wall of bulbs at HD. Even once they are available things may not be great for Cree on this front.

Cree does have a decent sized-space in the fixture area, because of the multiple kinds of downlamps they sell.

outtawhack said:   Surprising a light bulb would be reviewed, but it had a positive one on the verge: http://www.theverge.com/2013/3/5/4068174/cree-10-dollar-led-ligh...
Suprisingly the author doesn't say anything about the Color Rendering Index.

gnoelnivlac said:   Can it be used in countries with 220/240 Volt electrical outlet?I have the same question. Contacted the CREE support, waiting for their reply.

Will this work with dimmer switch?

love4money said:   Will this work with dimmer switch?

Dimmable Yes
http://www.homedepot.com/p/t/203991774?catalogId=10053#specifications

Hope Cree gets Energy Star rating soon. Some electric companies are offering rebates, such as my electric: 50% per lamp (max. $10 per) maximum 50 lamps per customer through 2013. These Crees do not (yet) have an E/S rating. Local HD expects stock within the next couple of months. I'll try one but wait for the E/S rating and the rebates for more. House was outfitted mostly with fluorescent when we built it 15 years ago, but still get ungodly electric bills.

Note this link is for comparison only, won't do you any good unless you live in this electric company's service area:

http://www.lpea.coop/pdf/rebates/LED_rebate_Flyer.pdf

kimgkimg said:   Mastayau said:   I would use these when my cfl burn out. From an energy save perspective its not enough to warrant the cost going from cfl to led.

I switched out a bunch of my CFLs for LEDs because I got tired of "waiting" for my CFLs to turn on (to full brightness).

+1 What a difference.



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