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love4money said:   Will this work with dimmer switch?

Cree says it not only works, but they list the highest compatibility level with dimmers I've ever seen for a non-incandescent bulb.

It will work with common CL (leading-edge) dimmers. It'll work with trailing-edge dimmers. It'll work with ELV dimmers, it'll work with MLV dimmers. This only leaves out variac dimmers, which no one has anyway.

So if, Cree is telling the truth, the dimmability should be astounding. They even joke about it, saying "give the electrician the day off", meaning shouldn't have to replace your dimmer.

And the compatibility chart backs it up pretty well.

http://www.creebulb.com/uploads/products-links/pdf/7.pdf?1-3

I received my Cree 9.5W warm white bulbs yesterday, and I have to say, I'm disappointed in the color quality. For starters, 2700K is on the warm end even for incandescent bulbs, and the combination of overly-orange and mediocre color rendition index makes everything look a little dingy. It's really almost an imperceptible step up in color quality vs. the CFLs that I had been using (which were rated by Popular Mechanics several years ago for having the best color quality of mass-market warm white CFLs).

It's nowhere near the color quality of the high-CRI Philips bulbs I've seen, or even the omnidirectional FEITs sold at Costco (though those are less efficient, at 850 lumens/13.5W vs. 800 lumens/9.5W for the Crees), to say nothing of the color quality of good halogen bulbs. I may end up sending them back and waiting for something better (the deal on the Philips bulbs sadly wasn't available in my area).

Do you have any updates on 220/240 volts compability ? I can't find any information about this.

sjwaste said:   Can either this or the daylight version be mounted in an enclosed fixture like the frosted glass half dome ceiling fixtures that are fairly common?
momoman said:   can someone who gets one of these bulbs report back if the bulb is suitable for enclosed fixtures? i search the cree website and could not find if these new bulbs are suitable for completely enclosed fixtures.
Here
Cree Customer Service Representative said: Q: Please comment on the use of the following bulb in enclosed fixtures, "CREE 9.5-Watt (60W) Warm White (2700K) LED Light Bulb (A-type)"

A: Thank you for your request. The LED bulb can be used in enclosed fixtures.

Kim Muszynski Customer Service Representative | Lighting - Racine

^^ thank you, mikefxu.

M̶a̶n̶ ̶e̶l̶e̶c̶t̶r̶i̶c̶i̶t̶y̶ ̶i̶s̶ ̶c̶h̶e̶a̶p̶ ̶i̶n̶ ̶M̶A̶ ̶i̶f̶ ̶y̶o̶u̶ ̶g̶u̶y̶s̶ ̶a̶r̶e̶ ̶s̶e̶r̶i̶o̶u̶s̶ ̶a̶b̶o̶u̶t̶ ̶1̶0̶ ̶c̶e̶n̶t̶s̶ ̶/̶ ̶k̶W̶h̶.̶ ̶M̶i̶n̶e̶ ̶c̶l̶o̶c̶k̶s̶ ̶i̶n̶ ̶a̶t̶ ̶6̶.̶2̶ ̶c̶e̶n̶t̶s̶ ̶/̶ ̶k̶W̶h̶

tegeril said:   Man electricity is cheap in MA if you guys are serious about 10 cents / kWh. Mine clocks in at 6.2 cents / kWh

Who is your supplier? I looked and found 13.5 cents per kWh. 7 for generation, 6 for distribution/transmission.

Ha you win, it rolled the last fee over to the back of the page... which... yep +.07

My bad

Yeah, deregulation (separation of generation and distribution/transmission) has made a mess of electric bills everywhere.

HappyScrappyHeroPup said:   tegeril said:   Man electricity is cheap in MA if you guys are serious about 10 cents / kWh. Mine clocks in at 6.2 cents / kWh

Who is your supplier? I looked and found 13.5 cents per kWh. 7 for generation, 6 for distribution/transmission.


One of the only cheap things here in Chicago is the electric....
I pay
4.65 cents for Supply
2.75 cent for Delivery
(and then taxes come out to be ~1.7 cents)

But 9 cents total sure isn't bad....

These finally came in in the local Home Depot.

I bought one of each of the colors, "warm white" & "daylight" in 60W to check out.

First, the colors. The warm white is a very close match to a 60W incandescent bulb. Personally, I find it slightly too warm but I don't like incandescent either at this wattage. The color temperature is a good choice for Cree, IMHO. Do not confuse it with a "cool white" (3000K) though. It is not, it is warm. The daylight is listed at 5000K and it is a very good temperature if you are into a daylight bulb.

Appearance & shape: These bulbs are VERY good to look at. The "light tower" design and the glass cover gives a very good feel of an incandescent lamp. Even looking at it it feels right, like a bulb should feel. It's the closes to an A19 shape and size I've ever seen. I assure you it will fit under virtually any harp that a 60W incandescent will fit under. From a traditionalists perspective, I think the is the best bulb to look at of any LED bulb made. I don't think it's even a close competition on this front. I do find the Philips L Prize bulb and the new white phosphor one to be pleasing to look at in their own way, but they don't look like an incandescent bulb looks.

Light: These have crummy CRIs (color rendition), period. There's no bouncing around that. The light thrown doesn't feel too harsh, but it is probably not going to feel natural in any situation that is at all demanding of light quality. The light does have a great (top notch!) dispersion pattern, no noticeable hotspots or dark spots.

Brightness: This bulb is a bit brighter than the 60W incandescents I have. It is not as bright as the other (850 & 925 lumen) LED bulbs I have. It is significantly brighter than "cheater" CFLs which try to reduce power usage by just being dimmer.

On speed/response: These bulbs turn on very quickly. Without doing exhaustive side-by-side checks, these are indistinguishable from incandescent in turn-on times.

Dimming: Cree makes astounding claims for the dimmability of these bulbs. They say they are compatible with leading edge (normal & CL), trailing edge, ELV and MLV dimmers. Due to the lack of rigor in dimming testing, I'm sure they can claim this. However, it isn't true on my leading-edge dimmer. While the bulbs do dim rather low and without flicker (no visible stroboscopic motion under their light), they also pulse (strobe) at any brightness below about 80% of full. The strobing is visible at virtually all dim settings out of the corner of your eye and is visible looking right at it at lower dim levels. In addition, this bulb has the weirdest dim curve of any LED I've seen. It casts light until well below the level at which an incandescent has become so dim you can only tell the incandescent bulb is on by looking right at it. I assure you that this bulb will not match the dim curve of any other bulb other than another Cree. I don't think I need to mention that the bulb also doesn't turn more orange as it dims like incandescents do (all LEDs are this way).

Origin: These bulbs are assembled in the USA.

Summary: These bulbs, in particular the daylight bulb, would make a fantastic bulb for your garage door opener or stoop. It produces good strong light with little power usage and is cheap. It is rated for use in an enclosed fixture and damp areas and turns on instantly. I would be careful using it as a bare bulb since this bulb has a glass cover on it which is breakable. Given the low CRI I wouldn't use these in living areas. And given the strobing I would never use one on a dimmer. This bulb is not a knockout product like the Cree downlamp replacements.

I still have LED bulbs that turn on quicker and dim better (LightingScience EcoSmart) and bulbs that are more efficient and cast better light (Philips L Prize). While this new bulb is good for some things, I still hope to see even better LEDs later.

who would have ever thought lights bulbs would be so confusing to shop for...

HappyScrappyHeroPup said:   Light: These have crummy CRIs (color rendition), period. There's no bouncing around that. The light thrown doesn't feel too harsh, but it is probably not going to feel natural in any situation that is at all demanding of light quality. The light does have a great (top notch!) dispersion pattern, no noticeable hotspots or dark spots.

Seriously...you purchased these and wrote that large of an eval and missed one huge aspect and got another one totally wrong!

These bulbs produce NO light at the tops (Huge dark spot!). Home Depot guy warned me, and I confirmed it after purchase. Bought 4 of them....so don't think it is a defect.

Also, one really interesting and important aspect of these bulbs is that they are rubberized. Meaning you can literally throw them on the ground and they won't break. the Home Depot guy said they took one out and spent 1/2 hour trying to bust it by dropping it on concrete...never happened.

Overall I like the lights so far. They work great for down lighting as you don't get the harsh glare when looking up at them, but they provide a nice disperse light across a room.

Another note, one of my local HD's did not have them out on display, and the other one were I found them told me they have had them for a while, but had no shelf space, so they just sat on the racks. They finally just set them up in the aisle. So if you HD doesn't have them out, pester customer service to check stock.

I ordered my bulbs at Home Depot's website a couple of weeks ago but I never got an email saying there were in the store. I was in a Home Depot store today and saw a large display of them so I bought them while I was there. I got the equivalent 60w soft white bulbs. These are great bulbs. The glass has a rubber coating I guess to protect it. This bulb is almost identical to a regular incandescent bulb with similar light color and it turns on instantly

Personally I'd wait a bit for the LED bulbs to come down in price and continue to use the CFL bulbs until they do.

The numbers add up and they all make sense:

http://www.designrecycleinc.com/led%20comp%20chart.html

The one thing that isn't clear is how they are figuring that each bulb will use basically 11 KWh per year.

It looks like the assume cost of electricity is also 10 cents USD per KWh which is a pretty decent "average".

Once LED's become a little bit cheaper, it's going to be a no brainer given the average lifespan of 50,000 hours.
A year has a little less then 9000 hours in it, so on average this bulb will make it 10+ years or normal usage.
After the first two years or so the rest is just money in your pocket for not doing anything.

Just bought one of the Cree 60w equivalent bulbs today. It was on display at HD and they range from $9 to $13 + tax. I purchased the warm color and they look just like the incandescent bulb it replaced. There is a dark spot at the tip of the light as mentioned above. I would rec this for a lamp before a downward facing light.

These hum/buzz very loudly when installed with my Lutron dimmer (the other Philips led light does not hum). Once I moved the bulb to the lamp by my bed, it did not hum/buzz, so my guess is its the dimmer.

Good price though.

ezwrighter said:   HappyScrappyHeroPup said:   Light: These have crummy CRIs (color rendition), period. There's no bouncing around that. The light thrown doesn't feel too harsh, but it is probably not going to feel natural in any situation that is at all demanding of light quality. The light does have a great (top notch!) dispersion pattern, no noticeable hotspots or dark spots.

Seriously...you purchased these and wrote that large of an eval and missed one huge aspect and got another one totally wrong!

These bulbs produce NO light at the tops (Huge dark spot!). Home Depot guy warned me, and I confirmed it after purchase. Bought 4 of them....so don't think it is a defect.


I don't know about no light, people would not be getting the right impression. But I did test these based upon your info. Here is what I found.

There is a darker spot at the top. This is actually a common energy-saving "cheat" on LED bulbs, because most incandescents are burned base down and so you don't need a lot of light out of the top. If I use one of these Crees as a bare bulb, you can wave it around and see the dark spot, like you were waving a "reverse flashlight" which dims right where you point it and illuminates elsewhere. I put it in a fixture I use which burns base down and tries to project light upward (torchiere) and it isn't noticeable there, because even the small amount of light reflected up by the bottom reflector (that keeps light from illuminating the floor where you don't need it) masks it. If you need truly all-around lighting, this might not work. If you are using a bulb sort of to "point at" something to light it, it certainly is a bad choice. But for other uses it seems fine.

Also, one really interesting and important aspect of these bulbs is that they are rubberized. Meaning you can literally throw them on the ground and they won't break. the Home Depot guy said they took one out and spent 1/2 hour trying to bust it by dropping it on concrete...never happened.

Put rubber over glass and you protect it some, but not much. If I put a thin later of rubber over your head, would think you cannot crack your skull? This is like a rubberized incandescent. It resists abrasions, but you certainly can break without much effort. It's too bad this bulb is $12 because I would like to bounce it around and try it to see how much it takes before breaking.

On another note, I got this year's Philips LED (not the L Prize or the old yellow EnduraLED, the one that looks white even when off, model 9290002268) and it seems great too. It doesn't seem to pulse like the Cree, it looks better to look at than the L Prize too. I also like the soft white (3000K) temperature. Too bad the CRI is poor (80) like the Cree. It also costs double what the Cree does.

I'll test this one better and maybe post about it sometime.

if you want to understand why there's no light coming from the top of the bulb take a look at the teardown report: teardown report with pictures
the 20 leds are arranged to throw light out the sides of the bulbs.

here's an interesting read for a Q & A with the cree vp of corp. marketing in an article from "designing with leds": Q&A link

this is what was said about using the bulb in an enclosure:I asked Mike a question that reader Chris posed in the original tear down piece: Can you use this bulb in an enclosed fixture? As Sal Cangeloso suggested in the comments, Cree intends that you be able to use the bulb in any application you would an incandescent. Mike agreed and elaborated: As long as there is an opportunity for air to circulate, the bulb will be fine.it doesn't sound like totally enclosed fixtures are ideal for the bulbs since heat is an enemy of leds, but with cree's 10 yr warranty i'm willing to try them in totally enclosed fixtures. i have some vintage prismatic glass hanging pendants that are totally enclosed.

There is light coming from the top of the bulb, just not as much as other directions.

I have just a tiny number of CFLs which are approved for enclosed fixtures. I've never seen other CFLs or LEDs that are approved for them. They just bottle up the heat too much, incandescents throw the heat off as infrared light, while these more efficient bulbs just heat themselves up.

I've had a non-approved CFL in an enclosed fixture for most of a decade now. I guess I just don't use it enough to suffer the ill effects of the shortened lifespan.

I cannot comprehend why Cree put so many LEDs in this bulb and then made them all the same color, giving it a lousy 80 CRI.

I also question if that teardown of the bulb is accurate. Putting LED strings in parallel doesn't work well at all, as any variance in voltage drops between the strings will cause one to be much brighter (and hotter/burn out quicker) than the other.

Picked up my 4 40w equivalent bulbs from Home Depot today... very impressed..It works great in my family room ceiling fan. I got the warm white 2700k and it works great with my dimmer too...No buzz or flicker at all. I am surprised as the Philips one had a bad buzz to it and had to be returned..I will be looking at the 60w equivalent one now..

I picked up one Cree and one EcoSmart today at HD just to try either of them out. The EcoSmart looks nicer since it doesn't have the bulky plastic ring below the bulb. I used the EcoSmart one with an older dimmer. For it to work, I have to turn on the dimmer to about half way for it to come on. Then I can tune it up or down to get the correct brightness. I have not tried it with a CFL-rated or LED-rated dimmer yet.

I placed my order on 3/18 and they still haven't shipped it yet. Is this still the case for most orders?

"I placed my order on 3/18 and they still haven't shipped it yet. Is this still the case for most orders?"

I never got my order either but don't bother waiting. There are in all of the Home Depot stores in big displays. They won't hit your credit card for the order unless you pick it up at the store. Just ignore the email if you ever get it.

I ordered these bulbs a month ago from Home Depot online with delivery to the store. I never heard anything after the order so I bought my bulbs two weeks ago at the store which had hundreds of them in stock. Today, I get an email from Home Depot saying my bulbs had shipped to the store. I called them and cancelled it.

mcpagano said:   I ordered these bulbs a month ago from Home Depot online with delivery to the store. I never heard anything after the order so I bought my bulbs two weeks ago at the store which had hundreds of them in stock. Today, I get an email from Home Depot saying my bulbs had shipped to the store. I called them and cancelled it.

Most H0meDep0t stores now have these on display. It might be worth taking a trip and seeing if they have them in store now. I have found them at 2 different HD stores at the end of an isle, not near the actual light section......I thought that was weird.

HappyScrappyHeroPup said:   On another note, I got this year's Philips LED (not the L Prize or the old yellow EnduraLED, the one that looks white even when off, model 9290002268) and it seems great too. It doesn't seem to pulse like the Cree, it looks better to look at than the L Prize too. I also like the soft white (3000K) temperature. Too bad the CRI is poor (80) like the Cree. It also costs double what the Cree does.

Aren't most CFL's CRI around 80 anyways? So this LED wouldn't be any better or worse CRI -wise?

Just noticed this thread. I actually bought the 2700K 60W bulb at HD, because I've been waiting for reasonably priced E26 LEDs to hit the market. They've been available for the E27 European sockets for quite a while, and there's a bunch of them made in China (branded and not) that are much cheaper than this.

PROs:
- beautiful warm tint
- bright, slightly brighter than one 13W (old-60W-equivalent) CFL I had
- doesn't heat up as much as a CFL
- turns on immediately (unlike CFL)
- I haven't tried dimming, but I'm sure it works, because it's LED
- the rubberized surface is nice to the touch (and according to a post above does not break easily)
- better for the environment than other light sources

CONs:
- 80 CRI might be a little low for light or photo viewing aficionados. Higher CRI (~92) LEDs have been available from CREE for a long time. Don't know how this compares to CFL, but I haven't seen any CFLs with a pleasant tint and I haven't been buying them due to environmental concerns that don't exist with LEDs.
- at $13+tax, it's way too expensive to take over the $0.25 incandescents and $2 CFLs, but cheaper than other branded LEDs I saw at HD. I hope prices come down soon.

Why do the 5000K cost $1 more than the 2700K? Aren't the 2700K a much nicer warmer light? And 5000K too white/blue?
I have some 3000K that still seem a bit white, but looking at the display at either HD or Lowes that shows different lit bulbs of different color temps, all of the ones above 3000K where way to white. I don't want my house to look like the office where I work.

esoterica said:   I received my Cree 9.5W warm white bulbs yesterday, and I have to say, I'm disappointed in the color quality. For starters, 2700K is on the warm end even for incandescent bulbs, and the combination of overly-orange and mediocre color rendition index makes everything look a little dingy. It's really almost an imperceptible step up in color quality vs. the CFLs that I had been using (which were rated by Popular Mechanics several years ago for having the best color quality of mass-market warm white CFLs).

It's nowhere near the color quality of the high-CRI Philips bulbs I've seen, or even the omnidirectional FEITs sold at Costco (though those are less efficient, at 850 lumens/13.5W vs. 800 lumens/9.5W for the Crees), to say nothing of the color quality of good halogen bulbs. I may end up sending them back and waiting for something better (the deal on the Philips bulbs sadly wasn't available in my area).

It's too bad they didn't make them 3000K. As I mentioned here, I have some 3000K LED's that are definitely not too warm. They're whiter/bluer than incandescent. But they're only 400 lumen, which is OK most of the time, but I sometimes want more.

dougef said:   kimgkimg said:   Mastayau said:   I would use these when my cfl burn out. From an energy save perspective its not enough to warrant the cost going from cfl to led.

I switched out a bunch of my CFLs for LEDs because I got tired of "waiting" for my CFLs to turn on (to full brightness).

+1 What a difference.

In my experience with different CFL's, you get what seems like about 75% of the light instantly, then it takes about 10 seconds to reach full brightness. How is that a such a big deal?

Update, I have a screened patio which previously had a lot of flying insects sneaking into it whenever I had the CFL's bulbs turned on at night. Well after having the Cree LED's bulbs in there for a few months, I have not seen one flying insect in the patio.

vanheve2 said:   dodotion said:   why would anyone pay this price for a lightbulb,,the old time "good bulbs are 25 cents a piece..i stocked up for a lifetime...
New Bulbs
old time "good bulbs

My condo has about 30 bulbs in it (a large house could have 60+).
"Old" bulbs cost $7/year, for $210 a year.
"New" bulbs cost $1/year, for $30 a year.

Yearly savings: $180
Savings over 10 years: $1,800
Initial cost: $390
New bulbs have an estimated life of: 22.8 years
Even if the new bulbs die 1/2 way through their life, your "old time" bulbs will cost you $1,410 more to use.


The sad part the bulb die sooner then manufacture claim so the math never add up.

if I bought $1,000 woth of these and installed in my home - is that smarter investment than paying $1,000 extra on my mortgage? I dont know that much math - someone pls reply. thanks

inbilya said:   if I bought $1,000 woth of these and installed in my home - is that smarter investment than paying $1,000 extra on my mortgage? I dont know that much math - someone pls reply. thanks

It depends on how frequently the bulbs they are replacing are usually turned on. If they are on 24/7 they will pay off in 3 months. If they are on only 5 hours a day, they pay off in 15 months. That's versus incandescents. If you have CFLs already then these would have to by turned on 3 years to pay back.

Paying down your mortgage pays back very slowly. It depends on your interests rate, but if you have a current, low rate mortgage if you have less than 10 years remaining on your mortgage paying back early won't save you all that much. These bulbs could outperform those savings.

Then again, this is all pretty theoretical. Waiting for these bulbs (or equivalently efficient ones) to drop to $7 would save even more.

I stuck one of these in my Craftsman (Chamberlain) garage door opener. One of the newest models (with MyQ/SecureLink) and when the lights are on the remote button in the car doesn't work. Clearly these bulbs are interfering with the radio reception of the garage door opener. Either 60W Cree produces this effect. I replaced the bulb with an IKEA 60W CFL and it works fine again.

HappyScrappyHeroPup said:   love4money said:   Will this work with dimmer switch?

Cree says it not only works, but they list the highest compatibility level with dimmers I've ever seen for a non-incandescent bulb.

It will work with common CL (leading-edge) dimmers. It'll work with trailing-edge dimmers. It'll work with ELV dimmers, it'll work with MLV dimmers. This only leaves out variac dimmers, which no one has anyway.

So if, Cree is telling the truth, the dimmability should be astounding. They even joke about it, saying "give the electrician the day off", meaning shouldn't have to replace your dimmer.

And the compatibility chart backs it up pretty well.

http://www.creebulb.com/uploads/products-links/pdf/7.pdf?1-3


This is slightly off topic of dimmers but what about illuminated (neon) switches? Do they fall into any of the 'dimmer' switch categories?

-d

I never thought of neon switches. But chances are they will not light with these bulbs.

If you want your dimmers to light, you'll probably have to replace your dimmer with an ELV dimmer. Those can light even with no bulbs installed at all. Also note that ELV dimmers require a neutral in the switch box, which some boxes may not have (esp. 3 way switches).

Sorry this probably isn't what you wanted to hear.

Thank You Sir!

I have been replacing batteries and buying new remotes for 2 months. It was so frustrating the door would open but never close with remote. Put in 2 CFL and it works great now.
Seeing as they operate at 315 MHz maybe Alex Jones is on to something about the LED bulbs spying on us.

HappyScrappyHeroPup said:   I stuck one of these in my Craftsman (Chamberlain) garage door opener. One of the newest models (with MyQ/SecureLink) and when the lights are on the remote button in the car doesn't work. Clearly these bulbs are interfering with the radio reception of the garage door opener. Either 60W Cree produces this effect. I replaced the bulb with an IKEA 60W CFL and it works fine again.

It depends on whether your mortgage rate is 3% or 7% and how many hours per day you use the bulb amongst other things. I wouldn't worry about it. The good thing about paying down your mortgage is that it is "forced savings," it directly results in higher net worth. The savings you get on your electric bill may not result in you putting money into your savings account (or other investment vehicle. It might just result in you spending the savings.

unmesh said:   I wonder if they will start making them in T5 tube sizes for undercabinet use. I'm replacing my kitchen bulbs at $6 each once a year

I saw the standard 4' one in California ... think Philips does them ... kind of look cool too.



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