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My wife has been looking into LASIK (bladeless) and I got this deal in the mail today, it's kinda far from us, but if we figure locally it is $3300 after discounts we can at least get a free trip to LA (Encino and Brea locations) too! Need to determine if this place is reputable first. Though fine print includes - Allegretto Wave-Optimized and IntraLase extra.

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The Details

Your vision isn't what it used to be, and you've been thinking about trading in your glasses and going with LASIK vision correction. This deal from Excel Laser Vision Institute could be just what you've been looking for. Dr. Moosa who has performed tons of procedures and his caring team are standing by to help you see better.

$1,750 ($3,500 value) for LASIK vision correction for both eyes
Includes any necessary follow-up visits
Improve both near and far vision
Work with USC and Harvard Medical School graduate Dr. Ferzaad Moosa
Easy-to-access locations in Brea and Encino

What You Need to Know

Buy as many as you like; send as many as you like as gifts
Limit 1 voucher redemption per individual
New customers only
Appointments are required and subject to availability
Merchant cancellation/re-scheduling policy of 24 hours applies; voucher subject to forfeiture
Valid for both eyes only
Valid only at the location selected at time of purchase
All services must be used by same customer
Excludes hyperopia and previous eye surgery patients
Pre- and post-operative care included
Excludes antibiotics and steroid drops
Like all surgery, LASIK procedure has some risks which will be discussed during your initial consultation
Customer must be a candidate for LASIK procedure or will receive credit toward another service from merchant or a refund from AmazonLocal
Allegretto Wave-Optimized and IntraLase are available for an additional fee
Available for use beginning the day after purchase
PROMOTIONAL VALUE EXPIRES FOLLOWING OCTOBER 8, 2013
PAID VALUE DOES NOT EXPIRE

Other conditions apply

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lasik
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Most Recent Posts
Again, no part of this sentence is correct. Non-wavefront procedures are designed to improve your visual acuity (this is... (more)

geo123 (Apr. 03, 2013 @ 8:43a) |

I had wavefront PRK done in Irvine back in December 2012. Yes my eyes are a little dry in the morning, but I had very po... (more)

ohWTF (Apr. 03, 2013 @ 1:25p) |

I just got back from my 2 week post op follow-up and was able to read the 20/10 chart! No halos or starburst, no pain, a... (more)

nomonies (Apr. 03, 2013 @ 1:57p) |

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I just got my Lasik done 2 weeks ago. Don't forget that you will likely need to go back the following day, a week after, a month after, 6 months after, and a year after for the post-op exams. Oh and a consultation appointment before surgery, and not wearing contacts for a whole week and another pre-op exam prior to your surgery. So, if you are not local, it might not work out as you think.

I also just got it done 2 weeks ago (March 21). LASIK isn't a good fit for bargain shopping, make sure you do plenty of research.

Keep in mind that it is NOT unusual to develop "dry eye" after the surgery...this means your eyes weep uncontrolably.I have that and there is nothing to do other than the medication called Restasis . Used twice a day, it will helpbut it takes about three weeks. It does not cure so you will be taking this med indefinately. this surgery damagesnerves which causes this.

nomonies said:   . LASIK isn't a good fit for bargain shopping, make sure you do plenty of research.

I think if you first find the doctor with a great reputation, THEN negotiate/find a deal with them, "bargain shopping" is fine. I would suggest the following:

Call ahead and see if they offer free LASIK consultations/exams. Even if they don't, the fee ($100-$150) is worth the opportunity to get to know them and talk face to face with staff. Also ask the fee for the procedure, and then ask if they accept vision insurance and if the vision insurance programs qualify you for a discount. These are the "discount" insurance programs many employers offer to add on to your medical insurance. The office staff may even divulge which programs offer the best discount. See if your employer offers these, or call the insurance to inquire about individual plans.

After they examine your eyes and give you the all clear for surgery, they will offer financing like Care Credit. These programs typically offer the patient 0% for 6-12 months, and pay the doctor a percentage of the procedure cost (90-95% I believe). This is one opportunity to offer to pay cash to the doctor and ask for a 5-10% discount in lieu of Care Credit.

Finally, when they bring you in for your pre-op consult, they will ask you to fill a prescription for an antibiotic. Ask if they have samples! Without insurance, this will cost $50-100. The sample size is actually a perfect size, as most people only use a few drops before and after surgery.

I know these discounts are nowhere near 50% off, but then again we are talking about your vision for the rest of your life. I only wanted to share that you can have a great doctor with a better price.

kailculus said:   I just got my Lasik done 2 weeks ago. Don't forget that you will likely need to go back the following day, a week after, a month after, 6 months after, and a year after for the post-op exams. Oh and a consultation appointment before surgery, and not wearing contacts for a whole week and another pre-op exam prior to your surgery. So, if you are not local, it might not work out as you think.

You should be able to find a local optometrist qualified to do the follow ups (other than the 1-day follow up, anyway). My optometrist handles all follow ups for refractive surgery for a flat fee. So that's an alternative to flying back to LA repeatedly for follow ups. Source: My wife and I have both done this after having lasik.

Got it done 3 years ago. 20/20 in my right eye, 20/25 in my left. Pretty satisfied.

Add CA to title, there are several Orange counties.

Double tap.

Krazen1211 said:   Got it done 3 years ago. 20/20 in my right eye, 20/25 in my left. Pretty satisfied.
Did you develop Dry Eye? I'm looking into Lasik but I'm concerned about the potential side-effects.

swandown said:   Krazen1211 said:   Got it done 3 years ago. 20/20 in my right eye, 20/25 in my left. Pretty satisfied.
Did you develop Dry Eye? I'm looking into Lasik but I'm concerned about the potential side-effects.


No. I had to use eye guards to sleep for a few weeks and put in some sort of eye drops several times a day to accelerate healing.

ZombieHunter said:   Add CA to title, there are several Orange counties.Eight in the U.S. actually.

California, Florida, Indiana, New York, North Carolina, Texas, Vermont, and Virginia


and strangely, one in China.

sweenepj said:   kailculus said:   I just got my Lasik done 2 weeks ago. Don't forget that you will likely need to go back the following day, a week after, a month after, 6 months after, and a year after for the post-op exams. Oh and a consultation appointment before surgery, and not wearing contacts for a whole week and another pre-op exam prior to your surgery. So, if you are not local, it might not work out as you think.

You should be able to find a local optometrist qualified to do the follow ups (other than the 1-day follow up, anyway). My optometrist handles all follow ups for refractive surgery for a flat fee. So that's an alternative to flying back to LA repeatedly for follow ups. Source: My wife and I have both done this after having lasik.



You should be able to find a local optometrist to do the follow ups for sure and with a fee. The general Lasik package price usually includes all the follow ups. Also if anything goes wrong, they can fix you up during the whole year which is also included in the package price.

Lol I hear ads for this guy on the radio all of the time. "We can offer a free exam to the first 15 KNX listeners worth $99"...

For the first few weeks, you will have to use certain eyedrops frequently. Keep this in mind when you calculate the cost, because I heard these eyedrops ain't cheap.

theedge103 said:   Allegretto Wave-Optimized and IntraLase are available for an additional feeThis is the enormous caveat to this deal. This deal is for the older non-wavefront guided surgery. Noone really does this anymore. In other words, to me this is a bait and switch -- they are trying to get you to pay for this and then, when you come in, tell you that the non-wavefront guided Lasik is the older version of the procedure, doesn't get the same outcomes and then get you to pay the difference to get wavefront.

Also, if you were looking for bladeless, this deal isn't for you. With Lasik, there is a flap that is created with either a blade or is bladeless (the term for bladeless is "IntraLase"). In this case, bladeless is extra, as there's an additional charge for IntraLase.

swandown said:   Krazen1211 said:   Got it done 3 years ago. 20/20 in my right eye, 20/25 in my left. Pretty satisfied.
Did you develop Dry Eye? I'm looking into Lasik but I'm concerned about the potential side-effects.


I still can't get over the tiny chance that your vision just gets messed up afterward, even go blind. Even if it is one in a million, I'd prefer to see with glasses/contacts.

I had LASIK about 4 years ago.

Overall I'm satisfied with the results, but I do feel that the complications are downplayed more than they should be. A quick Google search can bring up the true horror stories. Fortunately, they represent a very small percentage of LASIK outcomes, but there are other problems that the procedure can introduce that are far more common. Things like halos, starbursts, and other night vision effects occur rather frequently and in many cases don't go away in time. You'll generally get used to these oddities in time and probably won't feel that your vision is "ruined," but it is nice to be aware of them going in.

Has Lasik advanced enough to fix (Myopia)- nearsightedness and presbyopia at the "same" time? I just never saw the point at 50yrs old to have Lasik and still have the need for reading glasses.

edit: NM, read that if you want perfect distance, you will need reading glasses. Apparently they can do Monovision LASIK and Multifocal LASIK, all which sacrifice some distance quality and not perfect presbyopia correction... similar to the issue I have with my multifocal contacts.

belgique said:   Keep in mind that it is NOT unusual to develop "dry eye" after the surgery...this means your eyes weep uncontrolably.I have that and there is nothing to do other than the medication called Restasis . Used twice a day, it will helpbut it takes about three weeks. It does not cure so you will be taking this med indefinately. this surgery damagesnerves which causes this.

:'(

FYI. It states
Allegretto Wave-Optimized and IntraLase are available for an additional fee

Intralase is the minimum you should get. It makes the flap with a laser and is more predictable (this is beginning to become older technology even now). They don't state how they make the flap. MUCH older technology made the flap with a blade. That is a horribly unpredictable way of doing it and I hope they aren't doing that to bring the price down. Also it causes more glare problems and dryness than with all laser lasik.

Also it states it improves near and far vision. That depends on your age. If you're nearsighted and older than 40 it would actually make your distance vision better but near vision worse.

IMO if you want lasik go to someone you trust and not someone giving specials on Amazon. You only get one shot at it. If they screw up, it's your eyes.

NOT something you want to bargain shop for. Find an excellent surgeon, don't skimp on this one.

ZombieHunter said:   Add CA to title, there are several Orange counties.

Only one that matters, lets be real.

There is a lot of misinformation on this thread.

Wavefront guided ablation is not ideal for every candidate.

Get PRK if you want no flap and thus no flap related complications.

The USA Eyes Forum is the best Lasik forum on the net. Go there for real information.

belgique said:   Keep in mind that it is NOT unusual to develop "dry eye" after the surgery...this means your eyes weep uncontrolably.I have that and there is nothing to do other than the medication called Restasis . Used twice a day, it will helpbut it takes about three weeks. It does not cure so you will be taking this med indefinately. this surgery damagesnerves which causes this.

How much is this med if you have to take it indefinitely?

swandown said:   Krazen1211 said:   Got it done 3 years ago. 20/20 in my right eye, 20/25 in my left. Pretty satisfied.
Did you develop Dry Eye? I'm looking into Lasik but I'm concerned about the potential side-effects.


My son-in-law, who was as blind as a bat, had it done a year ago and now has almost perfect vision and doesn't need glasses...no side effects.
My grandmother had it done at 82, didn't need glasses afterwards and no side effects.

I am planning on having it done later this summer.

vegas4x4 said:   There is a lot of misinformation on this thread.

Wavefront guided ablation is not ideal for every candidate.

Get PRK if you want no flap and thus no flap related complications.
The two leading vision correction procedures are PRK (surface procedure) and LASIK (flap procedure). Either one can be done as a wavefront procedure (also referred to as "custom"), which is the way that both are typically done, as it uses your individual measurements and greatly reduces the incidence of HOA's (higher order aberrations -- difficulty seeing at night, glare, halos, blurring, starbursts, etc...). In other words, it doesn't matter if you end up getting LASIK or PRK -- either way you'll almost certainly want it done as a wavefront procedure.

As long as you are a candidate for LASIK, meaning that you have sufficient corneal thickness to create a good flap, don't have glaucoma, etc..., LASIK will generally be the procedure of choice. Although the final outcomes are generally similar (PRK does have a slightly higher incidence of HOA's but the literature on this subject is not uniform), PRK is a lot less comfortable for the patient, and the PRK recovery time is significantly longer. On the upside, PRK does not create a flap, so there are no flap related complications to worry about. That's the reason that some people with very, very high likelihood of taking a hit in their eye are sometimes told to do PRK rather than LASIK (even after the LASIK flap heals, it is only about 30% as strong as it was prior to the surgery). At the same time, even the military now allows most special operations forces to have either procedure.

IIVisionII said:   Intralase is the minimum you should get. It makes the flap with a laser and is more predictable (this is beginning to become older technology even now). They don't state how they make the flap. MUCH older technology made the flap with a blade. That is a horribly unpredictable way of doing it and I hope they aren't doing that to bring the price down. Also it causes more glare problems and dryness than with all laser lasik.No part of this post is correct. Microkeratome (blade) vs. IntraLase (bladeless) flaps have their own advantages and disadvantages but there's no medical literature that suggests that one is universally better than the other. Here is a very decent article in which two surgeons debate and explain their advantages and disadvantages: link

As such, most of the reasons behind the push for IntraLase have to do with patient psychology: people are understandably freaked out over the thought of a blade touching their eyes and feel better about "bladeless" surgeries. There are surgeons who only do microkeratome surgeries, there are surgeons who only do IntraLase surgeries and there are many who use both, as there are some conditions that favor one versus the other. The outcomes are very similar for both, but IntraLase tends to cost a little more because the surgeon has to pay additional royalties to the manufacturers.

vegas4x4 said:   There is a lot of misinformation on this thread.

The USA Eyes Forum is the best Lasik forum on the net. Go there for real information.


Link?


Bill Gates - can afford LASIK but chooses glasses
Disclaimer
ZombieHunter said:   Add CA to title, there are several Orange counties.The only Orange County that counts is the one with Disneyland in it. Dallas, California? Miami, Arizona?

VicVinegar said:   I still can't get over the tiny chance that your vision just gets messed up afterward, even go blind. Even if it is one in a million, I'd prefer to see with glasses/contacts.

VicVinegar said:   swandown said:   Krazen1211 said:   Got it done 3 years ago. 20/20 in my right eye, 20/25 in my left. Pretty satisfied.
Did you develop Dry Eye? I'm looking into Lasik but I'm concerned about the potential side-effects.


I still can't get over the tiny chance that your vision just gets messed up afterward, even go blind. Even if it is one in a million, I'd prefer to see with glasses/contacts.


That is why you have 2 eyes. Chances are one will be OK even if it is 1/1000000

larrymoencurly said:   ZombieHunter said:   Add CA to title, there are several Orange counties.The only Orange County that counts is the one with Disneyland in it. Dallas, California? Miami, Arizona?Sorry, but Orange County, FL has Walt Disney World, which makes Disneyland look like a Six Flags!

One of the side effects of LASIK is having halo/star at night, especially when you have extreme myopia. Taken too much cornea off may also weaken your eyes. So, I decided to have IOL instead when it was approved by FDC in 2005. Unlike LASIK, the procedure is reversible. I had -19 before surgery and had 20/20 afterward. It has been 8 years now and I still get close to 20/30 vision.

geo123 said:   IIVisionII said:   Intralase is the minimum you should get. It makes the flap with a laser and is more predictable (this is beginning to become older technology even now). They don't state how they make the flap. MUCH older technology made the flap with a blade. That is a horribly unpredictable way of doing it and I hope they aren't doing that to bring the price down. Also it causes more glare problems and dryness than with all laser lasik.No part of this post is correct. Microkeratome (blade) vs. IntraLase (bladeless) flaps have their own advantages and disadvantages but there's no medical literature that suggests that one is universally better than the other. Here is a very decent article in which two surgeons debate and explain their advantages and disadvantages: link

As such, most of the reasons behind the push for IntraLase have to do with patient psychology: people are understandably freaked out over the thought of a blade touching their eyes and feel better about "bladeless" surgeries. There are surgeons who only do microkeratome surgeries, there are surgeons who only do IntraLase surgeries and there are many who use both, as there are some conditions that favor one versus the other. The outcomes are very similar for both, but IntraLase tends to cost a little more because the surgeon has to pay additional royalties to the manufacturers.


I read the article you posted, but I have to disagree. It even states by one person in the article that intralase is much more predictable. It cuts to the same depth at every point in making the flap. One problem with the microkeratome is that it is more unpredictable. Some parts of the flap may be thicker, some thinner. The microkeratome can also have more flap complications like a completely detached flap, epithelial ingrowth, or metallic debris going under the flap. I think the only reason that anyone would get the microkeratome now over intralase is due to cost. I personally got intralase lasik and when I refer my patients I always encourage them to get intralase or above.

vegas4x4 said:   There is a lot of misinformation on this thread.

Wavefront guided ablation is not ideal for every candidate.

Get PRK if you want no flap and thus no flap related complications.

The USA Eyes Forum is the best Lasik forum on the net. Go there for real information.


You are correct. Wavefront guided is not needed for every patient, especially if they do not have a great deal of abberations (which should be tested for before the lasik). PRK is sometimes preferable with higher prescriptions due to no need for a flap. It is more uncomfortable for the patient and has a longer healing time, as well as the slight chance of resultant corneal haze. Lasik and PRK are both very good procedures however.

belgique said:   Keep in mind that it is NOT unusual to develop "dry eye" after the surgery...this means your eyes weep uncontrolably.I have that and there is nothing to do other than the medication called Restasis . Used twice a day, it will helpbut it takes about three weeks. It does not cure so you will be taking this med indefinately. this surgery damagesnerves which causes this.

I sincerely hope there will be a good generic for restasis in the future. It's a fantastic medication, but very unreasonable for most people at around 300+ dollars a month. Fortunately, intralase has slightly reduced the incidence or severity of dryness due to its enhanced precision over the microkeratome, however it is still a big factor. I have been taking restasis since my lasik procedure about 2 yrs ago. I tried stopping it just to see if the dryness had improved, but unfortunately it returned very quickly.

IIVisionII said:   geo123 said:   IIVisionII said:   Intralase is the minimum you should get. It makes the flap with a laser and is more predictable (this is beginning to become older technology even now). They don't state how they make the flap. MUCH older technology made the flap with a blade. That is a horribly unpredictable way of doing it and I hope they aren't doing that to bring the price down. Also it causes more glare problems and dryness than with all laser lasik.No part of this post is correct. Microkeratome (blade) vs. IntraLase (bladeless) flaps have their own advantages and disadvantages but there's no medical literature that suggests that one is universally better than the other. Here is a very decent article in which two surgeons debate and explain their advantages and disadvantages: link

As such, most of the reasons behind the push for IntraLase have to do with patient psychology: people are understandably freaked out over the thought of a blade touching their eyes and feel better about "bladeless" surgeries. There are surgeons who only do microkeratome surgeries, there are surgeons who only do IntraLase surgeries and there are many who use both, as there are some conditions that favor one versus the other. The outcomes are very similar for both, but IntraLase tends to cost a little more because the surgeon has to pay additional royalties to the manufacturers.


I read the article you posted, but I have to disagree. It even states by one person in the article that intralase is much more predictable. It cuts to the same depth at every point in making the flap.
You are just getting defensive now, which is silly. As the article explains (at the end, it also explains the results of the studies that have been done on this subject), while the IntraLase flap is more consistent, it does not translate into better outcomes. Both microkeratome and intralase flaps have their advantages and disadvantages but all the studies clearly show that one is not universally preferrable to the other one.

There are world renowed surgeons who exclusively use microkerome; there are world renowed surgeons who exclusively use IntraLase; there are world renowed surgeons who use both. Overall, when it comes to the blade vs. bladeless debate, it is way more about surgical skills than it is about the method. There is plenty of peer reviewed medical research on the subject. Instead of getting defensive, you may want to read it first.

By the way, the fact that you are so focused on the whole blade vs. bladeless debate immediately tells me that you are not familiar with any of the research and are just repeating the marketing. Whether the surgery is done with a blade or is bladeless is actually the least important part of the decision, as it is actually the part that is the least likely one to affect the final outcome.

P.S.
I underwent custom SBK (still a flap procedure, but it combines many of the benefits of PRK and greater comfort and much shorter healing times of LASIK) and have IntraLase flaps (and I didn't have any medical conditions that contraindicated microkeratome), so I am not posting that your understanding of microkerome flaps is way off because I am trying to reaffirm my own decision. Your posts are just contrary to all the peer reviewed medical research out there.

IIVisionII said:   Fortunately, intralase has slightly reduced the incidence or severity of dryness due to its enhanced precision over the microkeratome, however it is still a big factor.Respectfully, you still don't know what you are talking about. The type of procedure (there are multiple types of flap procedures) and the surgeon's skill influence the outcome way, way more than whether it was done with a microkeratome or intralase.

The flap procedure in general is much more likely to cause dry eyes than procedures like PRK. Having said that, SBK (Sub-Bowmanís Keratomileusis), is (much) less likely to cause eye dryness than traditional LASIK, even though both are flap procedures. You are focusing on the wrong things here.

Wavefront guided is not needed for every patient, especially if they do not have a great deal of abberations (which should be tested for before the lasik).Again, no part of this sentence is correct. Non-wavefront procedures are designed to improve your visual acuity (this is what the eye chart measures); wavefront-guidance allows the surgeon to also address contrast sensitivity and fine detail, which means sharper vision and reduced incidents of HOA's. Again, you can combine wavefront-guidance with either LASIK (including all the various variations of the flap procedure) or PRK.

What you are saying doesn't even make any sense. Each person's eyes are unique, just like every person's fingerprints are unique. Wavefront-guidance is used to address each eye's individual characteristics, so a statement that a person may not have "a great of abberations" is akin to a statement that a person's fingerprints "are not all that unique."

I had wavefront PRK done in Irvine back in December 2012. Yes my eyes are a little dry in the morning, but I had very poor vision with a high astigmatism and am glad to trade my now 20/20 vision for a slight dryness. No halo effect at night. I did my research and found a good doctor and paid more than this deal ($2100 per eye). The actual procedure doctor did my pre, post visits as well as all the follow ups. I am very happy with my results. My piece of mind was worth the extra cost. I had a friend go in with me who was actually rejected to any procedures they offered this sealed the deal for me that this place was not a cattle call.

Skipping 1 Messages...
I just got back from my 2 week post op follow-up and was able to read the 20/10 chart! No halos or starburst, no pain, and dryness is minimal. I see BETTER now than I ever could with glasses. I had intralase custom wavefront. All follow ups included and lifetime corrections if necessary, $3600 total.



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