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1000bulbs is selling the ETI Omni-Directional LED Bulb, 8.5W, 600 Lumens, 30K Life Hours for $4.99. Shipping to California is $9.93 for quantity of 1 but $10.38 for quantity of 10. Therefore, the purchase need to be in large quantity to save. Linky.

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Dimmable bulbs are also needed for use with photoelectric switches and motion sensors.

filmy (Jul. 05, 2013 @ 11:59a) |

Anyone try these in garage door openers?

Prngr44 (Jul. 05, 2013 @ 12:05p) |

Reasons for dimming:
1) To get the ladies into the right mood
2) get the other ladies into the right mood
3) so you can't s... (more)

dunguvirus (Jul. 05, 2013 @ 12:12p) |

Thanks for visiting FatWallet.com. Join for free to remove this ad.

Equivalent in light to a 50W conventional bulb for those wondering. Thanks OP, think I might pull the trigger although I'd like a few hundred more lumens.

Great deal. Not dimmable though, so that's a deal killer for me.

civicSI said:   Great deal. Not dimmable though, so that's a deal killer for me.

I was talking to a worker at HD about dimmable leds the other day. I had assumed they were ALL dimmable...but apparently not. I thought that since LEDs can have different amount of power supplied to control the brightness, that they would all be dimmable...but I guess household dimmers don't work like that I bet led dimmers show up at some point, that can just control the power output and that would control the brightness. Simpler and probably way cheaper to make.

ezwrighter said:   civicSI said:   Great deal. Not dimmable though, so that's a deal killer for me.

I was talking to a worker at HD about dimmable leds the other day. I had assumed they were ALL dimmable...but apparently not. I thought that since LEDs can have different amount of power supplied to control the brightness, that they would all be dimmable...but I guess household dimmers don't work like that I bet led dimmers show up at some point, that can just control the power output and that would control the brightness. Simpler and probably way cheaper to make.


I don't think you understand dimming at all. Current dimmers "do just control the power output".

The problem with dimming LEDs is they have a switching power supply inside and that power supply really should have constant power to it. Dimming reduces the power to that power supply.

The simplest way to dim an LED bulb would be to send full power to it and a control signal which says "dim to this level". Then the power supply would operate fine and the control circuity would just output less current from the power supply to the LEDs. But since there's no standard for this and this method won't dim any other bulb out there, this isn't done in the home. It is done with 0-10V dimmers in commercial applications.

Same seller, same price, cheaper shipping at Amazon -
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0082MRCQS/


HappyScrappyHeroPup said:   ezwrighter said:   civicSI said:   Great deal. Not dimmable though, so that's a deal killer for me.

I was talking to a worker at HD about dimmable leds the other day. I had assumed they were ALL dimmable...but apparently not. I thought that since LEDs can have different amount of power supplied to control the brightness, that they would all be dimmable...but I guess household dimmers don't work like that I bet led dimmers show up at some point, that can just control the power output and that would control the brightness. Simpler and probably way cheaper to make.


I don't think you understand dimming at all. Current dimmers "do just control the power output".

The problem with dimming LEDs is they have a switching power supply inside and that power supply really should have constant power to it. Dimming reduces the power to that power supply.

The simplest way to dim an LED bulb would be to send full power to it and a control signal which says "dim to this level". Then the power supply would operate fine and the control circuity would just output less current from the power supply to the LEDs. But since there's no standard for this and this method won't dim any other bulb out there, this isn't done in the home. It is done with 0-10V dimmers in commercial applications.


Ok..I never claimed to be an expert, but saying I don't understand dimming at all is a little rude. I found this article actually quite useful: http://www.digikey.com/us/en/techzone/lighting/resources/article...

ezwrighter said:   HappyScrappyHeroPup said:   ezwrighter said:   civicSI said:   Great deal. Not dimmable though, so that's a deal killer for me.

I was talking to a worker at HD about dimmable leds the other day. I had assumed they were ALL dimmable...but apparently not. I thought that since LEDs can have different amount of power supplied to control the brightness, that they would all be dimmable...but I guess household dimmers don't work like that I bet led dimmers show up at some point, that can just control the power output and that would control the brightness. Simpler and probably way cheaper to make.


I don't think you understand dimming at all. Current dimmers "do just control the power output".

The problem with dimming LEDs is they have a switching power supply inside and that power supply really should have constant power to it. Dimming reduces the power to that power supply.

The simplest way to dim an LED bulb would be to send full power to it and a control signal which says "dim to this level". Then the power supply would operate fine and the control circuity would just output less current from the power supply to the LEDs. But since there's no standard for this and this method won't dim any other bulb out there, this isn't done in the home. It is done with 0-10V dimmers in commercial applications.


Ok..I never claimed to be an expert, but saying I don't understand dimming at all is a little rude. I found this article actually quite useful: http://www.digikey.com/us/en/techzone/lighting/resources/article...


Hi. Welcome to the internet. You're (mostly) completely anonymous here, should you so choose to be. Feel free to cast derogatory insults at your fellow human beings as often as you feel necessary. Refreshments are in the break room, last door on the left, or you may find some more to your liking via "web browsing", a favorite past time here. Snarky replies are mostly accepted with little fanfare, and of note is the lack of any intervening officiating personnel. While nothing is condoned here, nor is it wholly reviled, revered or generally accepted. Opinions run rampant, and we are all correct in our own minds. I hope you enjoy your stay, don't forget to read about FWCB while you hunt for deals and further your education into dimming switches and internet applied psychology!

Sorry. Couldn't resist.

ezwrighter said:   
Ok..I never claimed to be an expert, but saying I don't understand dimming at all is a little rude. I found this article actually quite useful: http://www.digikey.com/us/en/techzone/lighting/resources/article...


That article doesn't address any of the issues relating to a wall dimmer and an LED bulb. It is not dimming in the sense we are talking about here.

That is how you dim an actual LED emitter. The problem is, as I said, is that there is a power supply in the LED bulb that converts the input voltage and current into another voltage and current. Adjusting the power before this power supply doesn't accomplish what you would like to do because in fact a switching power supply will attempt to produce the same output voltage and current (within of course what is possible given the input power) no matter what the input voltage and power is. A basic switching power supply, when placed on a variable power input will simply not vary its output at all. That is what a non-dimmable bulb like this one will do.

So what you need to do is adjust the power after that power supply.

Since that power supply is in the bulb itself, your wall dimmer adjusts the power before it, not after it. So you have two choices. One is to send full power and a control signal.

The other is to send a combined power and control signal. That is, make the power supply in the LED bulb recognize that the input power waveform is one that would produce a dim output on an incandescent bulb. Then have the power supply adjust its output accordingly. This second mechanism is what is used in general for home LED/CFL dimming, but it has the limitation that at very low dim levels, the input combined power/control waveform doesn't contain much power at all, so the switching power supply starts to fail to operate. That's why you get flicker or even bulbs with power supplies that fail.

Rude or not, you don't really understand dimming, and this was immediately apparent by you suggesting as a method exactly what is done, one which has a lot of limitations.

When someone points out your ignorance, the graceful thing to do is thank them. Who wants to be wrong or ignorant? We're all ignorant about a great many things. There's no shame in that. The shame is in being upset when someone is kind enough to point out our misconceptions.

HappyScrappyHeroPup said:   ezwrighter said:   civicSI said:   Great deal. Not dimmable though, so that's a deal killer for me.

I was talking to a worker at HD about dimmable leds the other day. I had assumed they were ALL dimmable...but apparently not. I thought that since LEDs can have different amount of power supplied to control the brightness, that they would all be dimmable...but I guess household dimmers don't work like that I bet led dimmers show up at some point, that can just control the power output and that would control the brightness. Simpler and probably way cheaper to make.


I don't think you understand dimming at all. Current dimmers "do just control the power output".

The problem with dimming LEDs is they have a switching power supply inside and that power supply really should have constant power to it. Dimming reduces the power to that power supply.

The simplest way to dim an LED bulb would be to send full power to it and a control signal which says "dim to this level". Then the power supply would operate fine and the control circuity would just output less current from the power supply to the LEDs. But since there's no standard for this and this method won't dim any other bulb out there, this isn't done in the home. It is done with 0-10V dimmers in commercial applications.


Would this save energy or would it simply lower the light output through forced inefficiency?

OK, Now that the dimming and maybe dumbing issue has been addressed and hopefully resolved, does anybody have any experience or knowledge as to the quality of these bulbs for what they are?

Thanks ahead of time,
Madalien

HappyScrappyHeroPup said:   ezwrighter said:   civicSI said:   Great deal. Not dimmable though, so that's a deal killer for me.

I was talking to a worker at HD about dimmable leds the other day. I had assumed they were ALL dimmable...but apparently not. I thought that since LEDs can have different amount of power supplied to control the brightness, that they would all be dimmable...but I guess household dimmers don't work like that I bet led dimmers show up at some point, that can just control the power output and that would control the brightness. Simpler and probably way cheaper to make.


I don't think you understand dimming at all. Current dimmers "do just control the power output".

The problem with dimming LEDs is they have a switching power supply inside and that power supply really should have constant power to it. Dimming reduces the power to that power supply.

The simplest way to dim an LED bulb would be to send full power to it and a control signal which says "dim to this level". Then the power supply would operate fine and the control circuity would just output less current from the power supply to the LEDs. But since there's no standard for this and this method won't dim any other bulb out there, this isn't done in the home. It is done with 0-10V dimmers in commercial applications.



The tone of this comment WAS rude, but then that's just my simple-mindedness being simple and assessing the actual intent of the commenter, which was to belittle the person he was commenting about, not to better inform him.

Most of the LED bulbs in my home are dimmable and I have 3 different brands with different specs. I used the Cooper Slide Dimmers purchased from eBay at this link.

They all work fine and smooth for me.

I have some 8 watt incandescent that I would like to replace but can't find any that are that dim in anything other type, Has anyone seen the small watt in led or Floursent?
These go in a stop light I have in my family room, and they put out to much light if I use more wattage.

OverRuled said:   Most of the LED bulbs in my home are dimmable and I have 3 different brands with different specs. I used the Cooper Slide Dimmers purchased from eBay at this link.

They all work fine and smooth for me.
$50 plus $12 shipping for ten dimmers...not sold in lesser quantities?

vadeltachi said:   OverRuled said:   Most of the LED bulbs in my home are dimmable and I have 3 different brands with different specs. I used the Cooper Slide Dimmers purchased from eBay at this link.

They all work fine and smooth for me.
$50 plus $12 shipping for ten dimmers...not sold in lesser quantities?


They have a search function on eBay
Here you go

I would not operate such a light bulb as this during a thunderstorm. One nearby lightning strike and this thing could become toast. These bulbs are too expensive to lose in that manner.

Back to the original post... FYI, this is 3000K temperature (color). So if their claim is accurate, it should provide a clean white/cream color, but not quite the warm yellow that 2700k provides.

shinobi1 said:   I would not operate such a light bulb as this during a thunderstorm. One nearby lightning strike and this thing could become toast. These bulbs are too expensive to lose in that manner.

$5 is too expensive to risk when the chances of what you said happening are maybe 1 in 1000000?

If you guys want to learn more about LED dimming, here's a few good source:

http://www.lutron.com/TechnicalDocumentLibrary/367-2035_LED_whit...

http://ledsmagazine.com/features/8/6/9

GreenTrash said:   HappyScrappyHeroPup said:   ezwrighter said:   civicSI said:   Great deal. Not dimmable though, so that's a deal killer for me.

I was talking to a worker at HD about dimmable leds the other day. I had assumed they were ALL dimmable...but apparently not. I thought that since LEDs can have different amount of power supplied to control the brightness, that they would all be dimmable...but I guess household dimmers don't work like that I bet led dimmers show up at some point, that can just control the power output and that would control the brightness. Simpler and probably way cheaper to make.


I don't think you understand dimming at all. Current dimmers "do just control the power output".

The problem with dimming LEDs is they have a switching power supply inside and that power supply really should have constant power to it. Dimming reduces the power to that power supply.

The simplest way to dim an LED bulb would be to send full power to it and a control signal which says "dim to this level". Then the power supply would operate fine and the control circuity would just output less current from the power supply to the LEDs. But since there's no standard for this and this method won't dim any other bulb out there, this isn't done in the home. It is done with 0-10V dimmers in commercial applications.


The tone of this comment WAS rude, but then that's just my simple-mindedness being simple and assessing the actual intent of the commenter, which was to belittle the person he was commenting about, not to better inform him.


If I didn't want to inform but instead just ridicule, why did I explain how it is actually done? Why did I explain further later?

ebbikenezer said:   Hi. Welcome to the internet. You're (mostly) completely anonymous here, should you so choose to be. Feel free to cast derogatory insults at your fellow human beings as often as you feel necessary. Refreshments are in the break room, last door on the left, or you may find some more to your liking via "web browsing", a favorite past time here. Snarky replies are mostly accepted with little fanfare, and of note is the lack of any intervening officiating personnel. While nothing is condoned here, nor is it wholly reviled, revered or generally accepted. Opinions run rampant, and we are all correct in our own minds. I hope you enjoy your stay, don't forget to read about FWCB while you hunt for deals and further your education into dimming switches and internet applied psychology!

Sorry. Couldn't resist.


While I appreciate the sentiment...I have been around FW a month longer than you I would hazard to guess, I have been around the internet even longer...However, I attempt to not frequent communities on the net that are rude, and FW has been a pretty good community over the last 10 years. I always do appreciate people adding to the discussion, but there is absolutely NO reason to belittle others to attempt to enhance your post.

ezwrighter said:   ebbikenezer said:   Hi. Welcome to the internet. You're (mostly) completely anonymous here, should you so choose to be. Feel free to cast derogatory insults at your fellow human beings as often as you feel necessary. Refreshments are in the break room, last door on the left, or you may find some more to your liking via "web browsing", a favorite past time here. Snarky replies are mostly accepted with little fanfare, and of note is the lack of any intervening officiating personnel. While nothing is condoned here, nor is it wholly reviled, revered or generally accepted. Opinions run rampant, and we are all correct in our own minds. I hope you enjoy your stay, don't forget to read about FWCB while you hunt for deals and further your education into dimming switches and internet applied psychology!

Sorry. Couldn't resist.


While I appreciate the sentiment...I have been around FW a month longer than you I would hazard to guess, I have been around the internet even longer...However, I attempt to not frequent communities on the net that are rude, and FW has been a pretty good community over the last 10 years. I always do appreciate people adding to the discussion, but there is absolutely NO reason to belittle others to attempt to enhance your post.


Awwww, I was just poking fun, sheesh.

I AGREE, the post... I don't think was "rude" per se but rather..... condescending... but I mean... if that sort of stuff gets to you (nowadays) you probably ought to not really post ANYTHING on the internet. EVERY subject is bait for someone.

That being said, a few posts up, was VERY informative info on dimming LEDs(links)...... which I appreciate, sincerely. One of my favorite things about the FW community (Over some other deal sites) is that, at the end of the day.... I learn SOOOO very much here, which helps me make wiser purchases in the future.

GreenTrash said:   HappyScrappyHeroPup said:   ezwrighter said:   civicSI said:   Great deal. Not dimmable though, so that's a deal killer for me.

I was talking to a worker at HD about dimmable leds the other day. I had assumed they were ALL dimmable...but apparently not. I thought that since LEDs can have different amount of power supplied to control the brightness, that they would all be dimmable...but I guess household dimmers don't work like that I bet led dimmers show up at some point, that can just control the power output and that would control the brightness. Simpler and probably way cheaper to make.


I don't think you understand dimming at all. Current dimmers "do just control the power output".

The problem with dimming LEDs is they have a switching power supply inside and that power supply really should have constant power to it. Dimming reduces the power to that power supply.

The simplest way to dim an LED bulb would be to send full power to it and a control signal which says "dim to this level". Then the power supply would operate fine and the control circuity would just output less current from the power supply to the LEDs. But since there's no standard for this and this method won't dim any other bulb out there, this isn't done in the home. It is done with 0-10V dimmers in commercial applications.


Would this save energy or would it simply lower the light output through forced inefficiency?


It's unclear what the antecedent is in your question. But if you are asking about separate control signals and power, then the system doesn't save energy or reduce efficiency (not much). Combined power and control just makes the circuitry in the bulb more complex mainly. A bulb needs a large capacitor or inductor to store enough energy to get across the AC nulls when the power available to the bulb is small. This makes the bulb bulkier and more expensive.

Separate control and power means you need more wires. It also makes your system incompatible with the wiring in house walls, making rewiring necessary.

A continuous full power with a control signal overlaid on top might be a best solution, but this solution doesn't work with any existing bulbs (incandescent, CFL or LED). Others like Philips have created solutions where the dimmer doesn't dim at all, it just sends a control signal wirelessly (Zigbee). This also is a good solution except it doesn't work with any existing bulbs.

I'm not sure exactly how all this will settle out. Philips (L Prize) seems to think they can just work with existing TRIAC dimmers. CREE seems to think they can work with any existing dimmer (TRIAC, reverse phase, MLV and ELV) but my testing doesn't bear this out. The good news is the technology is going forward rather rapidly. Hopefully we'll have a widespread working solution soon.

GreenTrash said:   HappyScrappyHeroPup said:   
I don't think you understand dimming at all. Current dimmers "do just control the power output".



The tone of this comment WAS rude,


No it was NOT rude.

Rude would have been "you are an idiot with no understanding of dimming."

Possibly or likely rude would have been "you do not understand dimming at all" depending on the rest of the message.

Informative pointing out of the problem is "I don't think you understand..." since it was not directed at the original poster but merely concerned how the posted comments were interpreted by the answering reader.

And even if it was rude, what does it matter? It's only words on a forum. Don't like it, or like it. Your choice, doesn't matter. Also note that with any social etiquette it is by definition RUDE to notice and call out when someone else is being rude. Everybody just needs to grow up and quit being such a baby about every imagined or potential slight.


And by the way, if you understood the section in the digikey article concerning triac dimming, then you probably also noticed the other flaws in that article as well as the tenuous applicability to the dimming being discussed in this thread. You may also want to be aware of leading vs. trailing edge dimming because many "dimmable" LED bulbs are compatible with one and not the other, while many if not most household dimmers do the other. The article did not discuss that at all, because such concepts are applicable to LED bulbs replacing incandescents, not dimming LEDs in general.

slickdeal45 said:   When someone points our your ignorance, the graceful thing to do is thank them...
I don't think you understand spelling at all. You're welcome.

madalien said:   does anybody have any experience or knowledge as to the quality of these bulbs for what they are?

Same question.

No reviews?

Can they be used in an enclosed fixture? (which, btw, it seems my 9.5W Cree bulbs do NOT like, 2 for 2 have started blinking)

The CREE led bulbs from HD dim just fine with home dimmers. We dim those all the time. $12.xx @ Home Depot.

3000 Kelvin.. One of the reasons (other than longevity) I love LEDs is the very white light. Bugs me that they even make 3k I installed 5 5000 Kelvin lights in my front yard lights from Home Depot and it looks brilliant. Bright white. I even put one in my neighbors front light just to help light things up. I have CCTV IP cameras (Q-See) around my properly and it lights things up great.

HappyScrappyHeroPup said:   
The problem with dimming LEDs is they have a switching power supply inside and that power supply really should have constant power to it. Dimming reduces the power to that power supply.

The simplest way to dim an LED bulb would be to send full power to it and a control signal which says "dim to this level". Then the power supply would operate fine and the control circuity would just output less current from the power supply to the LEDs. But since there's no standard for this and this method won't dim any other bulb out there, this isn't done in the home. It is done with 0-10V dimmers in commercial applications.


No the simplest way would be to put a resistor in series with the LEDs.

starlights said:   The CREE led bulbs from HD dim just fine with home dimmers. We dim those all the time. $12.xx @ Home Depot.

Yep I got the Cree from HD for my fans which have dimmers...It works great..No flicker or delay..

Lvscott said:   HappyScrappyHeroPup said:   
The problem with dimming LEDs is they have a switching power supply inside and that power supply really should have constant power to it. Dimming reduces the power to that power supply.

The simplest way to dim an LED bulb would be to send full power to it and a control signal which says "dim to this level". Then the power supply would operate fine and the control circuity would just output less current from the power supply to the LEDs. But since there's no standard for this and this method won't dim any other bulb out there, this isn't done in the home. It is done with 0-10V dimmers in commercial applications.


No the simplest way would be to put a resistor in series with the LEDs.


That's not dimming.

Yes, you'll reduce the brightness of the LEDs, but dimming is giving the person control over the brightness with a slider/dial. Putting a resistor in series with the LEDs doesn't accomplish that.

Additionally, the heat from that resistor would make the bulb overheat.

Yes, you want to put less current through the LEDs. Their brightness is directly (but not linearly) related to the current through them, reduce the current and you reduce the light output. The key to dimming is how to do you control that current from a slider or dial on the wall?

OK, riddle me this: Why is anyone interested in *DIMMNG* an LED bulb?

I'm not a conspiracy nut but part of me thinks this thread was engineered by the incandecent lightbulb companies. Every post after the original was a waste of time to read and just served to piss me off about LED bulbs.

In order to use LED bulbs that are dimmable, you have to install a dimmer switch made for LED lights. These swtiches would simply replace your existing ones that are dimmers and cost abotu $20 each, per (single) switch.

ttjbricker said:   In order to use LED bulbs that are dimmable, you have to install a dimmer switch made for LED lights. These swtiches would simply replace your existing ones that are dimmers and cost abotu $20 each, per (single) switch.

Not necessarily. See these other two informative posts:

HappyScrappyHeroPup said:   

I'm not sure exactly how all this will settle out. Philips (L Prize) seems to think they can just work with existing TRIAC dimmers. CREE seems to think they can work with any existing dimmer (TRIAC, reverse phase, MLV and ELV) but my testing doesn't bear this out. The good news is the technology is going forward rather rapidly. Hopefully we'll have a widespread working solution soon.


sylvan said:    You may also want to be aware of leading vs. trailing edge dimming because many "dimmable" LED bulbs are compatible with one and not the other, while many if not most household dimmers do the other. The article did not discuss that at all, because such concepts are applicable to LED bulbs replacing incandescents, not dimming LEDs in general.


In my current setup, I have four Phillips LEDs hooked up to a regular incandescent dimmer and they work fine. I know Lutron makes a model line (C-L) that is meant for CFLs and LEDs, but I wanted to integrate the controls into my Logitech Harmony. The Lutron Maestro IR doesn't come in C-L, only regular incandescent dimming. I was concerned that they would flicker or buzz, but that's not the case. They come on to full brightness immediately, fade to off, dim to a "favorite" or any other level with no issues.

these work in fans

Skipping 13 Messages...
Reasons for dimming:
1) To get the ladies into the right mood
2) get the other ladies into the right mood
3) so you can't see one of the ladies clearly without being drunk



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