• Page :
  • 1
  • Text Only
Voting History
rated:
I was at a Target in Rockford IL and saw the Sony BX45 46" LCD TV for $399.99 on clearance. I didn't think anything of it until I told my buddy who lives in Oceanside, CA and he picked one up there. Obviously YMMV, but a good deal for a 46" TV especially if you need another TV. A lot of Targets are going through their TV wall reset and need to clearance out these old models. Good luck!

Specs for TV

Member Summary

BX45
Thanks BMWLVR82
Disclaimer
Inventory checker

Online item # : 14093363

This invetory checker is from FeloniusMonkey.
Staff Summary
  • Also categorized in:
    • Manufacturer › Sony
Thanks for visiting FatWallet.com. Join for free to remove this ad.

Any way to check price/stock without calling/visiting the store?

Thats what I was trying to figure out. If any FW experts can help out with that. Much appreciated!

Is this new or refurb?

They had 2 in a box and one on display. In box is new. I added a invetory checker and the online item #.

If you know your store number and SKU go to here:http://checkinventory.home.comcast.net/~checkinventory/.
Also be aware this is a 60Hz. HDTV which for a 46" HDTV is not good![/L]

FSLOVE said:   Also be aware this is a 60Hz. HDTV which for a 46" HDTV is not goodIs 60hz really "not good" for 46in HDTV or is it just clever marketing that tells us that 120hz and 240hz is superior? What is true?

wfay said:   FSLOVE said:   Also be aware this is a 60Hz. HDTV which for a 46" HDTV is not goodIs 60hz really "not good" for 46in HDTV or is it just clever marketing that tells us that 120hz and 240hz is superior? What is true?A little of both unfortunately.

TheFinalProphecy said:   wfay said:   FSLOVE said:   Also be aware this is a 60Hz. HDTV which for a 46" HDTV is not goodIs 60hz really "not good" for 46in HDTV or is it just clever marketing that tells us that 120hz and 240hz is superior? What is true?A little of both unfortunately.This.

Video sources for 120Hz and 240Hz TVs are still 60Hz, but interlaced frames are created so the backlighting can be dimmed a split second earlier (before dramatic changes in the position of the image occur) thus reducing or eliminating the bleeding effect.

So, it depends on the response time of the backlight really. If the response time is really low, the backlighting has time to dim or shut off completely fast enough to eliminate the bleeding effect that causes motion blur, even at 60Hz.

TheFinalProphecy said:   wfay said:   FSLOVE said:   Also be aware this is a 60Hz. HDTV which for a 46" HDTV is not goodIs 60hz really "not good" for 46in HDTV or is it just clever marketing that tells us that 120hz and 240hz is superior? What is true?A little of both unfortunately.It is also worth mentioning that a fairly large portion of the population either lacks the visual acuity to detect motion blur, or is not bothered by it at all.

If these are in stock near you, I would say go check it out. The only way to know for sure if this particular display will be of satisfactory quality to you is to see it for yourself.

Make sure you adjust all the picture settings when you do though, because the store will have it in demo mode and optimized for a brightly lit sales floor that is almost certainly nothing like the environment you will be watching it in at home.

They had this TV for $419.98 @ the Hilldale Target in Madison!

Solipsist said:   Video sources for 120Hz and 240Hz TVs are still 60Hz, but interlaced frames are created so the backlighting can be dimmed a split second earlier (before dramatic changes in the position of the image occur) thus reducing or eliminating the bleeding effect.

So, it depends on the response time of the backlight really. If the response time is really low, the backlighting has time to dim or shut off completely fast enough to eliminate the bleeding effect that causes motion blur, even at 60Hz.


Well, you're partly correct.

Blu-ray sources are 24 FPS (so, 24Hz). Broadcast TV is 30, cable is 60 (both of those are gross generalizations, but assume it's close to accurate) and your game consoles are either 30 or 60FPS depending on the game and system. So, a 60Hz TV is great for everything but Blu-ray sources; to play a 30 FPS source, just double up on the frames (or hold each frame twice as long), and you're done. Unfortunately, 60 doesn't divide evenly by 24, so to view a 24 FPS source, some frames are doubled or interpolated, which leads to ghosts and blurs. Imagine a simple system to expand 24 frames into 60Hz: the TV tries to interpolate a half frame every 2 frames (or ... insert a bunch of other crazy image manipulation logic here. Most of the techniques TVs really use are proprietary/patentend and called things like SuperFantasticMotion TM), leading to classic ghosting and/or slightly blurry action on screen.

To watch Blu-rays and traditional sources, you'll want a frequency that can evenly be divided by 24, 30, and 60. Hence the popularity of 120 and 240 (240 is really only necessary for 3D, so that when you divide it by half - one cycle per eye - the effective refresh rate is 120Hz which again, divides by 24, 30, and 60.)

Any left at the rockford store? Im over here in Freeport(get your laughs in now lol) and would like to get a set!

I found one at Kmart oddly in Rockford for only $349 clearance priced on 5/31



Disclaimer: By providing links to other sites, FatWallet.com does not guarantee, approve or endorse the information or products available at these sites, nor does a link indicate any association with or endorsement by the linked site to FatWallet.com.

Thanks for visiting FatWallet.com. Join for free to remove this ad.

TRUSTe online privacy certification

While FatWallet makes every effort to post correct information, offers are subject to change without notice.
Some exclusions may apply based upon merchant policies.
© 1999-2014