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Filtrete 20 in. x 25 in. x 1 in. Ultra Allergen Reduction Purple Pleated FPR 9 Air Filter (Case of 12)

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filtrete
Thanks BMWLVR82
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Don't give up -- offer doesn't expire until July 17
Thanks larrymoencurly
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Most Recent Posts
Same here. I didn't expect it because it was a bulk buy from Home Depot. I was thinking "What the H@ll, nothing to los... (more)

tangster (Aug. 05, 2013 @ 12:56p) |

I got my check, but my order was 3 x 6 pack, so had a higher expectation. I really wanted FPR 9, but 7 were the highest... (more)

o2cats (Aug. 05, 2013 @ 3:16p) |

Ha, they're getting even cheaper!
Another thread: http://www.fatwallet.com/Home-Depot-coupons/60-off-select-filtre...

flamingonut (Aug. 06, 2013 @ 10:50a) |

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Nice deal! Grabbed 20x20x1 for the same price. Got it shipped free for $100.61 (after tax) or $8.38 per filter.

see all the filter sizes: http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/catalog/servlet/Search?storeId=1...
I got a bunch already when HD had the 50 off 100 cpn. But this is indeed a super deal.

Actually not just the purple variety. A bunch of others as well....
link

Thanks OP..In for 2 sets

Thanks..In for one


In for several, other sizes are good price too.

Nice post - very good deal! If the 90 day average claim holds true, I should be set for 3 years.

There are not enough items available to meet your order. Please reduce the number of items you are requesting

Is dead? I got above message when I tried to check out.

I'm always concerned about these type filters restricting air flow and negative impact on the a/c unit. I usually get the cheapy ones just to catch the dog and cat hair...I understand some people prefer the expensive allergen reduction type and always wondered if they worked well... found info on a/c furnace filters and types

http://www.startribune.com/local/yourvoices/160940835.html

inhoso69 said:   There are not enough items available to meet your order. Please reduce the number of items you are requesting

Is dead? I got above message when I tried to check out.
Not dead. Although OP's specific filter gives that error, I'd recommend using Boulos's link and try a different filter. I just tried the FPR 8 one and it doesn't give me that error.

Online Special Valid : 04/25/2013 - 07/17/2013

Thanks OP, Got a few sets

Nice find. in for a case!

Hey, OP! That's how you fatwallet!

If you use these understand that it wont wreck your unit.. it will just work a little harder as the filter catches more and more junk. Less space for the air to go through because it's a finer filter, harder unit has to work (Higher bill..) In the dead of summer/winter when Im running heat pump unit daily I replace these every 45 days but I check at 30. I wouldnt push them further than that. Right now as the temperature is kinda nice during the day and I barely run my unit at night to keep my kid warm, I buy the 3 dollar throw away special that goes when the weather changes. I replace with one of these.

Nice, In for 1

All out

I found a MIR for $6 for 3 packs that expires on June 30. I am not sure if we can use it on the case because it says something about multi packs are considered as one. I am going to try and if I get lucky I get another $6 off otherwise just wasted 46 cents.

Really good price. Thanks OP.

Cogtx said:   I'm always concerned about these type filters restricting air flow and negative impact on the a/c unit. I usually get the cheapy ones just to catch the dog and cat hair...I understand some people prefer the expensive allergen reduction type and always wondered if they worked well... found info on a/c furnace filters and types

http://www.startribune.com/local/yourvoices/160940835.html

You have a valid concern. Your A/C unit should be rated for use with a filter having a MERV rating of 11 (which is the spec for these filters). Using an incorrect filter will waste waste energy in the best case, and could damage your unit over time in the worst case. I'd never personally use a filter like this even though my A/C system is rated for this type of filter.

http://www.allfilters.com/airfilter/mervrating

"FPR and MPR are proprietary ratings systems developed by home improvement stores and filter manufacturers. They are not directly relatable to MERV (an FPR 4 filter cannot be compared to a MERV 4 filter). These ratings systems are not endorsed or backed by ASHRAE, and we do not recommend using filters not rated under the MERV system."

quoted from On Time Air Filters

I like to put these in the window and run a fan with it to bring it fresh filtered air. The 20x25 size is great for this.

in for a case! Great deal!

The best website (by far) thatI have found to "filter" and distill claims made about the effectiveness of filters (based on MERV, filter media type and thickness, and system pressure) is from....

...ta da!... The EPA: http://www.epa.gov/iaq/pubs/residair.html

Bottom line - Unless your home is similar in construction and in the number and sizes of cracks, holes, windows and other exterior openings that determine where and how often air enters as a lab, AND at what intervals and quantities, and you're pulling in outside air mainly AND most often through a conduit like an induction source that forces air through the HVAC filter, AND assuming that your HVAC system has the ability to compensate for the static pressure drop that can be caused by restrictive filters such as those higher than MERV 8 or so, most homeowners will not reduce a significant amount of the "stuff" in their indoor air they breathe and see by using an "ultra-uber-allergen" filter versus a decent but much lower priced PLEATED one that has officially been designated as a MERV 5 filter --- and Filtrete's separate MPR and FPR ratings are confusing and not industry accepted rating standards for particulate reduction (use MERV standards, instead).

A MERV 11+ filter, in real world RESIDENTIAL conditions ( i.e. NOT a lab) will NOT appreciably reduce actual particulate matter
through capture than a pleated MERV 5 will.

To control household air quality, get rid of carpeting, vacuum with a hepa vacuum often, and introduce as much outside air into your home as often as possible given weather and local atmospheric conditions, given that indoor air is precisely nastier in general because of the things we buy, have installed, use, and in general, accumulate in our homes (clothing, paper products, pets, carpeting, drapes, mattresses, pillows, cleaning sprays, etc.).

When I had my new Carrier system installed a year and a half ago I was told a MERV 8 was plenty (choice of 4" or 1", so I've stayed at 1"). I've also noted that my 20x25x1 is not 20x25x1, but actually a tad smaller. Some filters work, some don't.

Wow. Thanks if this goes through. Just got 4 cases of 6 filters (16 x 25 x 4) for $68 total. The best I can usually do is $20 each. This is less than $3 each.

Great deal on my 20 X 20 size. Thanks OP!

My A/C installer recommended NOT installing these filters as they are too restrictive of the airflow through the air handler and will cause premature failure of the fan motor. My last unit lasted 23 years and I have no desire to replace a failed unit.


air filter flow restriction, effectiveness
Disclaimer
DUDSTER said:   My A/C installer recommended NOT installing these filters as they are too restrictive of the airflow through the air handler and will cause premature failure of the fan motor. My last unit lasted 23 years and I have no desire to replace a failed unit.He's wrong because Filtretes are among the least restrictive air filters, about on par with cheap fiberglass filters. The A/C techs who service our units think Filtretes are great because they don't impede air flow much.
The only filters with better air flow are the very thick pleated ones or electrostatic precipitators.

The type of filters you absolutely must avoid are the washable, reusable ones, typically advertised as being electrostatic. Actually any air flow will generate static, but the amount is too trivial with those washeable filters to do anything, and those filters are terrible at purifying the air, possibly being worse than fiberglass mat filters.

Here's what Consumer Reports said in 2000. The reason I didn't list their 2012 review is because they listed far fewer filters, none of them very restrictive.

I agree with almost everything you've said. But, I would argue that if you can take care of a carpet, it is better than a hardwood floor. Get a couple new Roombas that have HEPA filters and run them everyday. Better yet, schedule them to run while you are not at home so any dust that gets stirred up settles before you get home. Get a $150 carpet cleaner from Amazon and use it once a month. The nice thing about carpet is that it traps dust and keeps it down. A hardwood floor just needs a little dust and air movement and that nasty stuff is in the air for you to breathe. One final thing that you can do, is run small HEPA filters in each room. Amazon has a nice HEPA filter that is washable and reusable for about $50. It's the first filter that comes up with a search for HEPA filter. I do all this and I don't need asthma or allergy medicine anymore.

JesseLivermore said:   The best website (by far) thatI have found to "filter" and distill claims made about the effectiveness of filters (based on MERV, filter media type and thickness, and system pressure) is from....

...ta da!... The EPA: http://www.epa.gov/iaq/pubs/residair.html

Bottom line - Unless your home is similar in construction and in the number and sizes of cracks, holes, windows and other exterior openings that determine where and how often air enters as a lab, AND at what intervals and quantities, and you're pulling in outside air mainly AND most often through a conduit like an induction source that forces air through the HVAC filter, AND assuming that your HVAC system has the ability to compensate for the static pressure drop that can be caused by restrictive filters such as those higher than MERV 8 or so, most homeowners will not reduce a significant amount of the "stuff" in their indoor air they breathe and see by using an "ultra-uber-allergen" filter versus a decent but much lower priced PLEATED one that has officially been designated as a MERV 5 filter --- and Filtrete's separate MPR and FPR ratings are confusing and not industry accepted rating standards for particulate reduction (use MERV standards, instead).

A MERV 11+ filter, in real world RESIDENTIAL conditions ( i.e. NOT a lab) will NOT appreciably reduce actual particulate matter
through capture than a pleated MERV 5 will.

To control household air quality, get rid of carpeting, vacuum with a hepa vacuum often, and introduce as much outside air into your home as often as possible given weather and local atmospheric conditions, given that indoor air is precisely nastier in general because of the things we buy, have installed, use, and in general, accumulate in our homes (clothing, paper products, pets, carpeting, drapes, mattresses, pillows, cleaning sprays, etc.).

Thanks, in for a case of the cheapies. My AC guy told me just go with simple ones and switch them out monthly.

Mods, why is this in Expired Deals when the expiration date is 7/17/2013?

larrymoencurly said:   Mods, why is this in Expired Deals when the expiration date is 7/17/2013?They're all OOS.

I had to stop by a Target last night to grab something at the last minute and as luck would have it, I noticed they had the Filtrete 300, 600, 1000, 1900 and 2200 all in stock and easily displayed next to each other.

I hadn't realized before that that it's at the point above the FPR of ABOVE 1000 that the filter media goes from a pleated mesh/woven type fabric to something closer to approximately 3 sheets worth of thickness of pleated resume paper together in the FPR 1500 and above.

This is not a scientific observation by any claim (clearly), but based on just "eyeballing" the filters, there is no way in Hades I'd put the the thick resume paper type filters that the 1500, 1900 or 2200 Filtretes use in my system for fear of it being too restrictive, and I actually have a relatively large HVAC system with a strong blower motor and large plenum. Not only do they appear just too excessively restrictive, but I'd wager money that they're far likelier to suffer premature clogging of the catastrophic kind that may occur even prior to recommended change intervals.

Interesting, although I can't find the links as of right now, and despite whatever 3M may claim, I also know that the Filtrete 1000 and 600 filters caused among the lowest static pressure drops (a good thing) compared to other filters.

The 600 and 1000 rated Filtretes seem to be plenty good enough to reduce dust, pollen, mold spores and other particulate matter, while also not making me worry excessively about over-restriction of the air supply through the filter and at the end of each run at the actual registers.

The 600 Filtrete was by far the best value at around $1.50 each (by the case) with sales tax, IMO, and I'm sorry I only ordered one case after seeing these in the store.

One final note - Dust, vacuum and clean the area around wherever your HVAC system and the filter resides, and use duct tape or electrical tape to seal any gaps that exist in the ductwork and sheet metal housing in areas that feed air to the filter (and the area right after it if the filter doesn't "seat" tightly"), especially if there's any activity or any things that give off dust (like sawdust, cat litter, etc.) in the area around your Furnance/AC system.

I have found that when the system kicks on and off, a lot of particulate matter and debris gets sucked into the system through those gaps. I even once used clear packing tape to do this, and by the end of a 30 day period, you could already see a white-ish/grey-ish film coating the inside layer of the tape in the ductwork leading up to the filter. Even little "pebbles" of styrofoam from a nearby open box full of packing peanuts were making their way into those gaps.

bestdealseaker said:   I agree with almost everything you've said. But, I would argue that if you can take care of a carpet, it is better than a hardwood floor. Get a couple new Roombas that have HEPA filters and run them everyday. Better yet, schedule them to run while you are not at home so any dust that gets stirred up settles before you get home. Get a $150 carpet cleaner from Amazon and use it once a month. The nice thing about carpet is that it traps dust and keeps it down. A hardwood floor just needs a little dust and air movement and that nasty stuff is in the air for you to breathe. One final thing that you can do, is run small HEPA filters in each room. Amazon has a nice HEPA filter that is washable and reusable for about $50. It's the first filter that comes up with a search for HEPA filter. I do all this and I don't need asthma or allergy medicine anymore.

I don't doubt you've made good progress improving your indoor air quality even with carpeting, but respectfully disagree that carpeting is better than laminate, hardwood or linoleum flooring in terms of making it easier to maintain relatively good indoor air quality levels.

Carpeting has multiple layers, including the padding, where not only does particulate matter get trapped (this is especially true when liquids and humidity are introduced into the equation) only to be released into the air later despite the most meticulous vacuuming, but that combination of carpeting with padding underneath fosters a much more favorable breeding ground for dust mites, mold and other allergens.

Hardwood, laminate and linoleum will obviously collect a "top layer" particulate matter, as all horizontal surfaces do, but they do not trap this material the way that carpeting and carpet padding does.

In addition, carpeting "off gasses" volatile organic compounds in much larger quantities and for far longer a time than other non-fabric floor coverings, and this is particularly significant given that indoor air is relatively stagnant and already of much poorer quality than outdoor air to begin with.

Wow, has HD's online ordering experience gone down hill.

On a 'ship to store' online order, my order is still showing as "Being Processed" 10 days after the order date.

I remember the days where these types of orders would be full processed within 3 days, max, and in less than 24 hours if the designated pick up store already had the item that was ordered in stock.

EDIT* -- What's really weird is that someone on SD posted that they contacted Home Depot CR about delay in shipping/processing orders, and claim that the HD rep told them that there is an issue of some kind WITH FLANDERS CORPORATE ???Flanders = NaturalAire, which is a brand of pleated HVAC filter that Home Depot also sells. Is it possible that Flanders makes at least some of 3M's Filtrete Filters?

I agree with ^ my order is ten days old and is just sitting there flappin in the breeze

Same here. I was just wondering about my missing order.

I received two emails from HD this morning. First gave tracking number for shipment. Second told me the order is delayed until June even though the shipment is on its way.

Ordered on 5/11 and got order confirmation on 5/12.

Good deal.

Skipping 93 Messages...
Ha, they're getting even cheaper!
Another thread: http://www.fatwallet.com/Home-Depot-coupons/60-off-select-filtre...



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