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Genesis gs-700 men's 25" flat bar road bike. Sharp bike at a good price. Free shipping - @ WalMart or go to www.walmart.com/ip/25-genesis-gs-700-men-s-flat-bar-road-bike/20...   Enjoy the ride.

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Genesis GS700
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FrugalFreddy (Jun. 23, 2013 @ 6:00p) |

Agree. If you can get that Marin bicycle for $150, that is a better value (pending it is in good shape).

delay (Jun. 24, 2013 @ 12:30a) |

Any happy purchasers of this bike?

ctgolfer (Aug. 30, 2013 @ 9:42p) |

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Interesting that the 22.5 has 5-star reviews, while the 25 has 3-star.

aarzi said:   Interesting that the 22.5 has 5-star reviews, while the 25 has 3-star.



If you look at the 1 star reviews for the 25, one of them called the MFG rather than use google to find out about bike, one was for damages in shipping, and last one was for what sounds like mis-assembly to me. If you throw out those reviews, they are pretty positive for a lightweight hobby bike.

Bought one used from someone on craigslist to use as a vacation home bike. It is an excellent value. It is a pretty good bike at an exceptional price. You can take it from pretty good up to very good if you can do some tweaking to it.

Your first step really ought to be getting some decent level brake pads for $12-$15. That REALLY enhances the braking performance, and greatly reduces the brake squeal that comes from the painted rim. That isn't difficult to do yourself. I did, and I'm not that mechanically inclined.

I'm going to put some handle bar ends on it (about $15) to increase the number of riding positions. The geometry has me leaning forward a fair amount and I got some hand tingling from leaning on my ulnar nerves. But that isn't the bike's fault. I was on a 50 mile ride on it. Yes, it held up to a 50 mile ride.

I thought the seat was ok. But this price point might attract a more casual rider, who then might want to buy a more comfortable saddle. (the hard core bike riders call it a saddle. People buying at this price point more likely call it a bike seat.)

There aren't going to be nearly as many people needing the 25" bike. Probably for 6'2" ish or over.
Fortunately, looks like the 22.5" is the same price.

For this price, I consider this bike an excellent value. But if you get it and it doesn't seem to be working well, it probably just needs someone to do some minor adjusting to make it work very well.

Looks decent for the price. I'd hesitate to call this a road bike though, it's more a hybrid, mostly MTB stance and components with road rims. For longer road rides you'll likely want to have drop bars and the nice trick shifter/brake combo levers.

Great find, but both versions get removed from my cart when i try to check out - no mater whether ie or chrome, no matter whether logged in or checking out as guest.

Can anyone provide more detail or comment on the components (derailleurs, crank, rims, etc.). It lists Shimano derailleurs but not which model Shimano. Couldn't find any more details on this bike other than on WalMart.com

drrck said:    I'd hesitate to call this a road bike though, it's more a hybrid, mostly MTB stance and components with road rims. Yep, got it.

I don't have any experience with this bike, just been around bikes for a long time, long enough to know that most bikes from WalMart end up in the garage and never ridden again because they're poorly made and they break fast, and break over and over again. Serious bike mechanics won't want to work on it, either, any more than a BMW mechanic would want to work on a Yugo. Put your $130 toward a higher quality bike that you'll ride 'til the end of time


are 22.5" and 25" frame sizes? both seem very large
lol, this 4-star review should be 1 or 2 star in my book
Sprocket on rear wheel breaks under stress.06/23/2012
I love this bike! I rode it for about a week and one day I was pedaling up a hill and I was in 3rd gear and the rear sprocket broke under the stress of power applied while pedaling up a hill. I took it back and the WalMart associates kindly and quickly exchanged mine for another one just like it in the store. TWO DAYS LATER same thing happened again! I reluctantly returned it for the cash. Other than that this bike was the best. Hope the manufacturer's fix the problem

Hmm. I'm interested, but I'm short (5' 6"), so I'm afraid that the 22.5 is still too big. But such good reviews for a cheap bike.

5% CB going through Shop Discover.

are they measuring them differently now? when I bought my Mountain bike 20yrs ago, it was a 20", and I am 6'1. a 25" bike would be HUGE, but seems like that's the normal size now.

drrck said:   Looks decent for the price. I'd hesitate to call this a road bike though, it's more a hybrid, mostly MTB stance and components with road rims. For longer road rides you'll likely want to have drop bars and the nice trick shifter/brake combo levers.

you shouldn't take this bike off the "road/paved path". no shock or suspension any kind, when going off road that will vibrate your arms and ass to destruction.

My cheap super old mountain bike have both front and back suspension. I didn't know how well it worked until I ride my new bike without the back suspension. My butt was cursing at me the whole time. Had to change to a gel big ass saddle/seat.

If you're in the 5'8" - 6' range, the 22.5 may work for you. You'd likely have to be 6'4"+ though for the 25" bike to work.

22.5" = 57cm, 25" = 63.5cm. I'm 6' tall, 32" inseem and ride a 58cm Trek road bike. 57cm might be a tad small for me as it would be hard to get the handlebars high enough to accomodate the right riding position, and 63.5cm is HUGE by today's standards...you'd need at least a 34" inseem and probably be 6'3"+ to properly fit that frame. Consider that most of the big manufacturers of bikes today don't go past 60cm, or maybe 62cm on some of their models, and you get a good idea how the 25" frame doesn't make sense.

richardyc - you're thinking of bikes sized by tire size. As kids, you work your way up to 20", and most adult-size BMX bikes still run on 20" tires with a larger frame. Once you get into adult bikes the tire size is fairly standardized (26" or 29" on mountain bikes, 700c on road bikes) and you're entirely working on frame size (typically in inches on mountain bikes, 15-20", and centimeters on road bikes, 49-62cm).

omarECD said:   Can anyone provide more detail or comment on the components (derailleurs, crank, rims, etc.). It lists Shimano derailleurs but not which model Shimano. Couldn't find any more details on this bike other than on WalMart.com

As the very helpful "bigboxbikes" link says, it is Shimano Tourney components. I believe this is their absolute lowest end components available for flat bar bikes (flat handle bars with trigger shifters, as opposed to a road bike with shifters incorporated into the brake levers).

Are they fantastic? Of course not. But as I mentioned, I rode the bike 50 miles. I can honestly say I did not HATE the shifting. It was ok. Which for that money, is a decent value.


I am 6'0" and have a 32" inseam. The 22.5 was fine for me.

I agree with DirtCheapDad that the handle bars were low for my preference, because I wasn't going for a super-aggressive riding position. I am going to try to put a bar riser on the Threadless headset, (about $30) and get a little more upright riding position.

But just because it is a flat handle bar, it isn't a mountain bike. It is a road bike. The fork and seat have no shock suspension components. It is just for more relaxed riding than a drop handle bar racing type road bike. The tires are a little wider, too, but still roll pretty decently. So I found it a nice balance.


For comparison, I have 2 phenomenal bikes. I have an aluminum Specialized Roubaix with 105 components. And I have a carbon fiber Specialized Roubaix with Ultegra components. Look, this bike is not those bikes. If you look hard, you can get an excellent used bike with 105 components for about $600. If you plan to ride, and you can swing that, yes, spend the $130 on a bike like that.

If you just want something pretty decent to sit in the garage, and pull out occasionally, and knock around the neighborhood for a mile or 5, and don't want a lot of money tied up sitting there, then I think this is a good value for you. And an even better value if you can do a little learning on how to tweak things occasionally, since it isn't going to be worth it to you to have someone working on it or repairing it, as that would quickly exceed the cost of the bike.

Ya all bike experts, is this bike worthy of being in a list for the value along with the Genesis V2100 & Saber? I've been wanting a bicycle, so I've read reviews on the Genesis brand (usually cheaper than Mongoose and other brands)...each time I read it, I question myself if I should buy cheap Wally bikes. I want a bicycle for running with dogs...and I may ride on a grass field for a very short period of time. And, I think I'm young enough that shocks from bumpy grass fields won't bother me, so this bike can be a candidate. But, if I'm spending already $129 on this bike and V2100 is way better for $20 more, I'll go with V2100. What's your take?

Thanks in advance

WorkerAnt said:   drrck said:   Looks decent for the price. I'd hesitate to call this a road bike though, it's more a hybrid, mostly MTB stance and components with road rims. For longer road rides you'll likely want to have drop bars and the nice trick shifter/brake combo levers.

you shouldn't take this bike off the "road/paved path". no shock or suspension any kind, when going off road that will vibrate your arms and ass to destruction.

My cheap super old mountain bike have both front and back suspension. I didn't know how well it worked until I ride my new bike without the back suspension. My butt was cursing at me the whole time. Had to change to a gel big ass saddle/seat.


It will be perfectly fine on graded dirt packed roads at relatively short distances (1 hour or less). This setup is way better than a POS "mountain bike" with crap dual suspension, for which cheap ones less than $200 weigh in close to 50 pounds. According to the review, this unit is 27 pounds. You will really feel the difference there.

vagrants said:    is this bike worthy of being in a list for the value along with the Genesis V2100 & Saber?

I want a bicycle for running with dogs...and I may ride on a grass field for a very short period of time. And, I think I'm young enough that shocks from bumpy grass fields won't bother me, so this bike can be a candidate. But, if I'm spending already $129 on this bike and V2100 is way better for $20 more, I'll go with V2100. What's your take?




This bike and the V2100 are on the same value list. The Saber has better shifter/derailleur components, and therefore costs more.

If you are planning on riding while the dogs are running, unless you own greyhounds, then I would go with the V2100.

The GS700 will ride faster for the same effort due to the lighter weight of a not having the shock absorbing equipment, and better rolling resistance of the tires.

The V2100 will be more comfortable due to the shock absorbing equipment, and larger tires. It will be slower, but that is irrelevant since you will be able to go faster than the dogs on either one. So might as well have the comfort.

For $20 more, it is not a way better bike in general, but from what you have said, it seems like a better bike for your usage.

Any suggestions on motorizing this? Or any other sub $200 bike? Max travel distance 20 miles/trip. City use only. Low traffic area.
Max gradient encountered: steepish bridge. Don't mind getting off the bike and pushing it over the bridge.
Thanks!

is this safe for the road? i'm always weary of buying bikes from WalMart and non-bicycle stores.

badaboom said:   is this safe for the road? i'm always weary of buying bikes from WalMart and non-bicycle stores.delay just mentioned he takes this on 50-mile trips. If they're not safe for the road, what are people using them for? Of course they're safe with proper inspection and maintenance. What a strange question.

Not takes; took! Once! But then that was used, bought off of CL. Says something for the product.
Or perhaps that one was modded and/or assembled professionally.

badaboom said:   is this safe for the road? i'm always weary of buying bikes from WalMart and non-bicycle stores.

The bike is safe for the road, but you are not.

delay said:   

This bike and the V2100 are on the same value list. The Saber has better shifter/derailleur components, and therefore costs more.

If you are planning on riding while the dogs are running, unless you own greyhounds, then I would go with the V2100.

The GS700 will ride faster for the same effort due to the lighter weight of a not having the shock absorbing equipment, and better rolling resistance of the tires.

The V2100 will be more comfortable due to the shock absorbing equipment, and larger tires. It will be slower, but that is irrelevant since you will be able to go faster than the dogs on either one. So might as well have the comfort.

For $20 more, it is not a way better bike in general, but from what you have said, it seems like a better bike for your usage.


Thank you very much! Your opinion helped me a lot. I appreciate it!

badaboom said:   is this safe for the road? i'm always weary of buying bikes from WalMart and non-bicycle stores.It's understandable if you get weary riding the cheap heavy bikes from such stores, but getting weary buying?? Ouch! Perhaps they break so frequently, you have to keep re-buying and that makes you weary.

In any case, this bike is much lighter, and would not make you weary.

Just be wary of posting comments like yours, or you will soon get weary of responses like mine.

This looks ok for the money, I also recommend checking out used bikes at your local bike shops and (especially) co-ops. I've had good luck going that route.

aarzi said:   Not takes; took! Once! But then that was used, bought off of CL. Says something for the product.
Or perhaps that one was modded and/or assembled professionally.



Yes, it is a safe bicycle.

There are a couple of critical issues that would make a bicycle unsafe. The most likely one would be if the brakes weren't working or adjusted correctly. So, yes, by all means make sure you check the brakes before riding.

After that, it would be if the front wheel came off, or if the frame had a catastrophic failure. So just check to make sure the wheels are securely attached. No reason for the frame to have a catastrophic failure.


Regarding my personal Genesis GS 700 tale, I wanted to keep an inexpensive bike at my mother-in-law's place in Florida. I'm not there that often to have an expensive bike there, but I like to ride when I'm there. Found this one on craiglist. It was definitely not modded or professionally assembled. I suspect it wasn't assembled well, as the brake pads were not seated correctly on the rim, the pads were unevenly and completely worn down, and the metal behind the pads was scratching on the rim. I went to a bike store, spent $12 on some excellent brake pads, and put them on. I did a minor adjustment on the cables, and the centering of the brake pads. I had never done either. Just did a search on youtube, and watched a couple tutorials on it.


I was 8 miles into my first bike ride, and got a flat. Looked at the tire, and had run over a nail. No idea why. Oh well.
Had to go back home/home, so no chance to fix it or ride it again. Brought a couple of inner tubes with me to Florida next time I was back. Replaced the tube, reinflated the tire, and off I went on the 50 mile ride.


I was going over 20 mph down the Fort Myers Beach bridge, if anyone knows where that is.


So, yes, the bicycle is safe. The improper assembly that could happen at WalMart would be the safety issue. That is a legitimate concern. Make sure the brake adjustment is such that the brakes are working. Make sure the wheels are attached properly. But that would be with any bicycle. Nothing in particular of concern with this bike.


I'm not trying to talk anyone into buying this bicycle. I don't work for Genesis, nor WalMart. I'm just giving one person's opinion, that has 2 exceptional road bikes, and has a decent Giant hybrid bike to compare to. The GS 700 is safe, isn't too heavy, doesn't take an unreasonable effort to pedal up to a good speed, and shifts decently. The brake pads are a weakness, but are not an expensive fix and makes a world of difference.

aarzi said:   Any suggestions on motorizing this? Or any other sub $200 bike? Max travel distance 20 miles/trip. City use only. Low traffic area.
Max gradient encountered: steepish bridge. Don't mind getting off the bike and pushing it over the bridge.
Thanks!
Bump in the hope of getting a response.

aarzi said:   aarzi said:   Any suggestions on motorizing this? Or any other sub $200 bike? Max travel distance 20 miles/trip. City use only. Low traffic area.
Max gradient encountered: steepish bridge. Don't mind getting off the bike and pushing it over the bridge.
Thanks!
Bump in the hope of getting a response.



dream on...............

Putting a engine on any bike that was not specifically designed for it is begging for problems. Find a used scooter.

Most of the motor for bicycle I have seen are generic. Do your best to fit it, that's pretty much the basic rule for bicycle. I've run into many issues with generic parts not fitting. Just a few days ago I had to return a generic kickstand.

There are a very few bicycles out there that fitted with a motor inside the hub of the wheel. Mainly use for assist. performance bike just had a clearance on them a few months ago for $1k. Come with battery and a few other accessories that normally you had to buy extra (lights, back seat, fenders, bell, etc). A fully features loaded bicycle. I was so tempted to get it. Perfect for any mom to ride around in.

Got the bike today. Very fast shipping. Looks really nice. Doesn't need too much assembly. Just need a 5/8 Allen key. Its say included in it but it was missing. So wasn't able to assemble it.
Thanks

22.5 is OOS

Got the bike as well.

Easy to assemble and for the price cannot beat it! Negative is squealing brakes but appears to decent quality for the money.

^ you can adjust the brake to stop the squealing.

delay said:   Bought one used from someone on craigslist to use as a vacation home bike. It is an excellent value. It is a pretty good bike at an exceptional price. You can take it from pretty good up to very good if you can do some tweaking to it.

Your first step really ought to be getting some decent level brake pads for $12-$15. That REALLY enhances the braking performance, and greatly reduces the brake squeal that comes from the painted rim. That isn't difficult to do yourself. I did, and I'm not that mechanically inclined.

I'm going to put some handle bar ends on it (about $15) to increase the number of riding positions. The geometry has me leaning forward a fair amount and I got some hand tingling from leaning on my ulnar nerves. But that isn't the bike's fault. I was on a 50 mile ride on it. Yes, it held up to a 50 mile ride.

I thought the seat was ok. But this price point might attract a more casual rider, who then might want to buy a more comfortable saddle. (the hard core bike riders call it a saddle. People buying at this price point more likely call it a bike seat.)

There aren't going to be nearly as many people needing the 25" bike. Probably for 6'2" ish or over.
Fortunately, looks like the 22.5" is the same price.

For this price, I consider this bike an excellent value. But if you get it and it doesn't seem to be working well, it probably just needs someone to do some minor adjusting to make it work very well.


Delay, are there any brake pads and bike seats you recommend switching to?

Kool Stop pads are probably the best out there, and don't usually cost more than any other brake pad at the local bike shop. Just get normal black or combo black/salmon pads and you'll be good to go.

Seats are highly subjective. You'll probably need to go to the local bike shop and get your sit-bones measured. You just sit upright on a memory foam pad for a minute or two, and measure the indentations (your sit bones) from center to center. Add 10-15mm to that width and that's the necessary seat width you should buy. After that, it's all about what feels right for you. Don't assume more padding on a seat is better. Some people do best with almost no padding, but most road cyclers use padded shorts and little to moderate padded seats accordingly.

These brake pads seem good for $9 for two pairs: http://www.amazon.com/Dia-Compe-Grey-Matter-Brake/dp/B001CJZ2S8/...

"Dia Compe 76 Grey Matter Brake Pads (Bag of 4), Grey" are under $9 on Amazon, they seem decent. I've had bad luck with no-name ones off eBay, even if you can get more.

val3ntin3s said:   

Delay, are there any brake pads and bike seats you recommend switching to?



I honestly don't remember which brake pads I bought. Just whatever the small local bike store had.

Might have been tektro? But really anything for about $10 will be great improvement. If you look at those brakes, you will see that they "auto-adjust" to the rim angle when you are installing them so they make flush contact with the rim.


Regarding the seat/saddle, I never changed it. I do wear the padded bike shorts, and then wear regular shorts over them. The world doesn't need to be subjected to that!

So I'm the wrong guy to ask on that one, unfortunately. I never have found a seat/saddle that I love.

Skipping 19 Messages...
Any happy purchasers of this bike?



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