cyberpower UPS on sale best buy

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350V - $29.99
425VA - $34.99
625VA- $49.99

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CyberPower 350VA Battery Backup System
Thanks Llilith
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CyberPower 350VA Battery Backup System
Thanks Llilith
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Most Recent Posts
Did it have a graphics card? 425VA is like 200-230W. AMD CPUs (most of them) take 100W. A discrete gaming GPU can take 1... (more)

VirtuaL (Jun. 27, 2013 @ 12:30a) |

I've tried that approach and simply bought the new unit. What I found is that when buying UPS units on sale like many o... (more)

itsausername (Jul. 01, 2013 @ 7:56a) |

Check out this eBay store. http://stores.ebay.com/Gruber-Power-Services A friend's family owns the company and the pric... (more)

DirtCheapDad (Jul. 01, 2013 @ 10:56a) |

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would the $30 one be enough for a router & modem(cable) & an ooma box ?


how do you figure out what size you need ?

nothing special here. I wouldnt go lower than 625 and thats the same price at BH, Microcenter, Amazon, etc

i thought it was something like watts * volts * .6 or something like that

anyone?

importcf said:   nothing special here. I wouldnt go lower than 625 and thats the same price at BH, Microcenter, Amazon, etcI dunno. This link is for the 625 version: http://www.amazon.com/Cyberpower-CP685AVR-UPS-8-Outlet-Compact/d... and Amazon's price is $70.99 right now.
That would make BB's $49.99 a good deal.

I think I found it.

Watts = Amps x Volts

Watts = Volt Amps (or sometimes called VA)

Take the rated UPS VA and multiply by .6, lets call it UPSY.

Add all VA of your network equipment, lets call it NETX.

If NETX < UPSY, you are good to go.

(does not take into account runtime, i'll assign that as homework)

should be fine and give you CLOSE to 30 mins of time i'd think.

How many minutes they last depends on the load.
You could add up all the watt on devices connected and if it's 50watt, a 350VA will last around 20 minutes.
If your device only shows mA rating, watt= voltage*amp. (100mA =0.1A)
If the rating is after it goes through a power supply, add 15% for conversation loss.

Buy the 350VA, test it and if not happy with minutes move it on to a less demanding job and get the next size up for the important job.

Let's just put everything into perspective here. For 99.9% of us, this device will do 2 things:
1) Protect and prevent your computer from shutting down due to intermittent brown-out/black-out occurrences.
2) IF YOU ARE HOME...give you time to shut down your PC in case of a full power outage.

If you aren't home, and there is a power outage longer than a few minutes, this device won't help you. It's not smart...it doesn't connect up to your computer through monitoring software, and so your computer won't know to properly shut itself down or hibernate. For that you'll need to spend at least 2X these prices (more likely 3X). So don't worry so much about the VA ratings. I'd say just buy the lowest price and call it good, or spend a lot more and get a smart UPS with monitoring. 10+ years ago before LCDs became more prevalent, you only bought a UPS to cover about 10 minutes. With more efficient computers and LCD monitors, the same VA ratings will often deliver 20-30 minutes. If you're not home...you're not home...and an extra few minutes isn't going to get you anything except a lighter wallet.

1300 VA CyberPower been found at Costco for $90. I have stockpiled them.

tweekerz said:   1300 VA CyberPower been found at Costco for $90. I have stockpiled them.

+ $50 membership fee = $140

DirtCheapDad said:   Let's just put everything into perspective here. For 99.9% of us, this device will do 2 things:
1) Protect and prevent your computer from shutting down due to intermittent brown-out/black-out occurrences.
2) IF YOU ARE HOME...give you time to shut down your PC in case of a full power outage.

If you aren't home, and there is a power outage longer than a few minutes, this device won't help you. It's not smart...it doesn't connect up to your computer through monitoring software, and so your computer won't know to properly shut itself down or hibernate. For that you'll need to spend at least 2X these prices (more likely 3X). So don't worry so much about the VA ratings. I'd say just buy the lowest price and call it good, or spend a lot more and get a smart UPS with monitoring. 10+ years ago before LCDs became more prevalent, you only bought a UPS to cover about 10 minutes. With more efficient computers and LCD monitors, the same VA ratings will often deliver 20-30 minutes. If you're not home...you're not home...and an extra few minutes isn't going to get you anything except a lighter wallet.

I do not think what you are saying is correct as far as the 625 goes.
If you look at the description you will see that software is included
http://www.bestbuy.com/site/CyberPower+-+625VA+Battery+Back-Up+S...
PowerPanel Personal Edition software included
If you goole "PowerPanel Personal edition" you can find its specs
http://www.cyberpowersystems.com/products/management-software/pp...
From the power panel page:
" PowerPanel Personal Edition software automatically saves your files and safely shuts down your computer in an intelligent and orderly matter"

Doubtful,

Have a member buy you a gift card, and purchase it for yourself.
Plus, the membership fee would not be for the sole purchase of UPS silly.



YankeeRedneck said:   tweekerz said:   1300 VA CyberPower been found at Costco for $90. I have stockpiled them.

+ $50 membership fee = $140

YankeeRedneck said:   would the $30 one be enough for a router & modem(cable) & an ooma box ?

how do you figure out what size you need ?

The $30, 350VA model is plenty for the router, modem, Ooma, and probably also a monitor and ink jet printer.

VA is the continuous RMS volts * peak amps

watts is continuous RMS volts * continuous RMS amps and never exceeds VA.

Generally the watt rating of a backup supply will be roughly 60% of its VA rating.

Power needs estimators aren't that accurate and tend to give numbers that are too high. The best way to determine what you need is by plugging everything into one power strip and plugging that into a Kill-A-Watt, and then making the computer do as much stuff as possible at once (video game, random disk I/O) to get the maximum VA or watt reading. Get a backup supply rated for at least 1/3 more than the worst-case VA or watt rating.

tweekerz said:   1300 VA CyberPower been found at Costco for $90. I have stockpiled them.How long you gonna store them? The sealed lead acid batteries might not last very long. When they go, typically ~3 years in use, you'll most likely just buy a new unit since they are rather pricey items - analogous to ink in a printer...

YankeeRedneck said:   tweekerz said:   1300 VA CyberPower been found at Costco for $90. I have stockpiled them.

+ $50 membership fee = $140


We save more than $50 a month just buying gas there.

YankeeRedneck said:   tweekerz said:   1300 VA CyberPower been found at Costco for $90. I have stockpiled them.

+ $50 membership fee = $140

How come I see longtime FW members make such dumb comments so often anymore? Really? So are Costco members supposed to add the membership fee to the cost of each and every single item purchased there? We get it. If you belong to a warehouse club, there's an annual fee, and to some extent, it factors in to the items purchased. But nobody joins without realizing this, and likewise one joins because one realizes a large value and degree of savings throughout the year. Enough already!

one realizes........................^

YankeeRedneck said:   would the $30 one be enough for a router & modem(cable) & an ooma box ?


how do you figure out what size you need ?


I'm looking for one for the same need. I figure in bad weather, with a potential tornado on way, it would be good to have a UPS driving router/modem/ooma/laptop charger.

I dont think you're going to find someone 'sizing' it for your need. I'm personally keeping my eyes open for a 1200-1500va unit, which will drive a much heavier load (TV or PC) for 45-60 minutes, and should easily power an ooma/router/modem/laptop for 4+ hours or longer. Something like this

I wouldn't skimp on the $30 unit - 20 minutes of power would only add to the fear if a large storm were bearing down on you.

Volt Amps >= Watts

The relationship is complicated because it depends on the phase relationship between voltage and current. Watts is actually Volts * amps * Power Factor which is a number between 0 and 1. On a modern 80Plus computer power supply, the power factor will probably be .98 to 1. On a non-80Plus supply, the power factor may be as low as .6. On some cell phone/USB chargers I've seen power factor as low as .2 when its not charging -- but then power consumption is tiny. A KillAWatt or similar device will actually display watts, volt amps, and power factor. Bear in mind that power consumption will vary with usage.

A 350VA supply should be way more than adequate for a household router, modem, and OOMA device. I'd figure a worst case of 15W each, and a worst case of 25 VA each.

Be careful these cyberpower UPS backups are junk. I got several of the 425VA and they are not even powerful enough to hold a light AMD system without the overload alarm going off. That's without a monitor or anything else attached to it!!!

^ what's your definition of "light"? I've used CP UPSs for years and never had a problem powering a system + monitor + router. Last one I had was a 425VA.

fyi DO NOT plug laser printers to any UPS... my friend plugged his HP laserjet to a UPS, and it would drain all the power when he tried to print.... replaced the printer, the cable, the ups, and almost threw out the pc just because of this...

tafandi said:   fyi DO NOT plug laser printers to any UPS... my friend plugged his HP laserjet to a UPS, and it would drain all the power when he tried to print.... replaced the printer, the cable, the ups, and almost threw out the pc just because of this...Sometimes just having the laser printer and backup supply plugged into the same wall outlet or household AC circuit will make the backup supply turn off briefly when the printer starts, crashing the computer. The backup needs a good AC line filter installed in it, but some don't.

thanks

I bought the 425VA.
Should be plenty to keep modem, router, and ooma happy during a power outage.

About ten years ago, Best Buy had a small (probably 350VA) Cyberpower on sale for $20. Bought them for myself, father and a friend.
In less than a year, all three refused to power up (and it wasn't dead batteries). I bought a fourth one, stuck my dead one in the box and returned it as a DOA. A few months later, the new one was dead.
Four for four.
Haven't bought a Cyberpower anything since.

itsausername said:   tweekerz said:   1300 VA CyberPower been found at Costco for $90. I have stockpiled them.How long you gonna store them? The sealed lead acid batteries might not last very long. When they go, typically ~3 years in use, you'll most likely just buy a new unit since they are rather pricey items - analogous to ink in a printer...They keep much longer on the shelf and not in use. And batteries are not so pricey if you just buy generic replacements instead of going to the mfr.

taxmantoo said:   About ten years ago, Best Buy had a small (probably 350VA) Cyberpower on sale for $20. Bought them for myself, father and a friend.
In less than a year, all three refused to power up (and it wasn't dead batteries). I bought a fourth one, stuck my dead one in the box and returned it as a DOA. A few months later, the new one was dead.
Four for four.
Haven't bought a Cyberpower anything since.


Maybe your lesson should be to not buy $20 ones.

My cyberpower ones (the $100+ ones) work well, and have been working well for years.

gallymimus said:   Be careful these cyberpower UPS backups are junk. I got several of the 425VA and they are not even powerful enough to hold a light AMD system without the overload alarm going off. That's without a monitor or anything else attached to it!!!

Did it have a graphics card? 425VA is like 200-230W. AMD CPUs (most of them) take 100W. A discrete gaming GPU can take 110+W, and the mobo, RAM, and drives can take 50W.

No wonder it was overloading, you didn't size your UPS correctly.

comprx said:   itsausername said:   tweekerz said:   1300 VA CyberPower been found at Costco for $90. I have stockpiled them.How long you gonna store them? The sealed lead acid batteries might not last very long. When they go, typically ~3 years in use, you'll most likely just buy a new unit since they are rather pricey items - analogous to ink in a printer...They keep much longer on the shelf and not in use. And batteries are not so pricey if you just buy generic replacements instead of going to the mfr.I've tried that approach and simply bought the new unit. What I found is that when buying UPS units on sale like many of us do, the price for the whole unit will equate to (or even be less than) the well priced battery packs alone.

Looks like letting these units sit for years is a bad idea, due to self discharge and sulfation, which permanently reduces charge capacity (one of many similar links). This motivated me to get a stored unit out and plugged in.

Check out this eBay store. http://stores.ebay.com/Gruber-Power-Services A friend's family owns the company and the prices on eBay with shipping tend to be reasonable...not great but reasonable especially if you have one of the $50-100 units with better technology and can just replace a $30 battery.



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