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Antennas Direct C2 ClearStream Television Antenna
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Recently cut the cord from comcast (sort of). Went from $160/month for the triple play bundle to just internet for $50/month. Installed the Antennas Direct ClearStream 2 attenna in my attic and I am able to pull in station from 30 miles away at quality higher then Comcast HD. Also jumped on the recent $100 deal for Ooma. 

I picked it up in their B&M locations, but it is available online too but shipping is not free: http://www.bjs.com/antennas-direct-clearstream2-outdoor-long-range-digital-antenna.product.182074

Bundle includes:

  • ClearStream 2 Antenna
  • Outdoor Mast and Mounting Hardward
  • 30 Feet of Coaxial Cable

Reviews at Amazonhttp://www.amazon.com/Antennas-C2-ClearStream-Television-Antenna/dp/B0017O3UHI 


    

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The one in the OP probably works about the same as a double bowtie (DB4) built from any of the free internet plans.
Unfor... (more)

taxmantoo (Aug. 22, 2013 @ 9:39p) |

WNBC (Virtual channel 4) broadcasts on UHF channel 28 from Manhattan, most likely the Empire State Building.

NEDeals (Aug. 22, 2013 @ 9:57p) |

It depends on your geographic location and what you want to view. The picure if for a combo UHF/VHF antenna and will wor... (more)

DanoMcGarret (Aug. 22, 2013 @ 10:22p) |

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Note that this model is UHF-only. I own the UHF/VHF model, which works fantastic, especially if you have VHF channels in your area. I bought a refurb model from Amazon for $25. No problems. Amazon listing: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B007RH5GZI

Yes, a dirty little secret of HDTV is that over-the-air broadcasts can have noticeably better video quality than the same channel over cable TV.

Secret to successfully transition to broadcast is the antenna. Putting the right antenna in the right place and pointing it correctly will provide most with a great picture, lots of programming, and a fatter wallet.

Visit http://tvfool.com  and run a report for your address to see what channels should be available to you, where they are, and what antenna will pull them in for you.
See what programming is available on those channels at http://titantv.com. 

The thing you will miss most about cable is your DVR. Recording programs for sure, but also pause and rewind ("What'd she say?"). Tivo is probably the best OTA DVR, but pretty expensive with a lifetime service plan. You can still find the venerable echostar DTVpal DVR (or it's channel master clones) on eBay. echostar and channel master are going to release a new DVR that combines OTA with OTT...

http://thebeersoncomcast.wordpress.com/2013/08/21/echostar-to-release-two-new-ota-dvrs/ 

Merritline on occassion has an antenna for $6.99 including shipping.  I have 3 in use and they all work well.  I pick up 23 channels off the air on 1 TV and  18 on the other 2.  The difference is due to the antenna location.  All antenna are inside and within 3 to 4 ft of the TV.  Another idea for free TV.  Reception is great.

As mentioned, key is antenna placement - not the antenna. You can make a great antenna from a piece of wood, coat hangers, screws, and some antenna wire. Videos all over Youtube. I'm further than 30 miles and I have great reception.

wizwor said:   The thing you will miss most about cable is your DVR. 
  
I have decided to go with a Dell Refurb Win 7 for HTPC ($140) and Silicondust TV Tuner ($60) - $200 gave me a good DVR and access to Netflix. Windows Media Center is a robust system, may not be the most feature rich one. But it is enough and hassle free to watch TV and Netflix

tgottman said:   Merritline on occassion has a digital antenna for $6.99 including shipping.  I have 3 in use and they all work well.  I pick up 23 channels off the air on 1 TV and  18 on the other 2.  The difference is due to the antenna location.  All antenna are inside and within 3 to 4 ft of the TV.  Another idea for free TV.  Reception is great.

Antennas are not "digital," they just receive RF energy and are optimized for certain wavelengths (and by extension, frequencies). Any digital conversion is handled by the tuner.
So any good antenna that is designed for the TV broadcast frequencies and aimed properly will work with digital TV.

johnny98 said:   

Yes, a dirty little secret of HDTV is that over-the-air broadcasts can have noticeably better video quality than the same channel over cable TV.

 


This. Most people don't realize that the quality of over the air broadcast is much better than the HD signal over cable.

Yep....We had a decent cable company until Time Warner came in and bought them.
We cut off everything and got internet through Windstream.
I popped up a Leaf antenna that I got on Amazon and could not believe the picture quality!

RG

 
johnny98 said:   

Yes, a dirty little secret of HDTV is that over-the-air broadcasts can have noticeably better video quality than the same channel over cable TV.
 


  
Actually, the dirty little secret is that most of the population doesn't care.  Convenience and variety trumps quality for nearly all of the human population.  (I know, my wife and daughter don't give a rat's behind for anything that's better than NTSC, but there's heck to pay if they should lose access to one of "their" shows)

bosbeemer said:   
johnny98 said:   

Yes, a dirty little secret of HDTV is that over-the-air broadcasts can have noticeably better video quality than the same channel over cable TV.


 


This. Most people don't realize that the quality of over the air broadcast is much better than the HD signal over cable.

  pretty much common knowledge OTA is uncompressed, cable/sat/iptv all use compression based on available or allocated bandwidth to get you all those worthless channels

The EXISTENCE of broadcast television is not even common knowledge

wizwor said:   Secret to successfully transition to broadcast is the antenna. Putting the right antenna in the right place and pointing it correctly will provide most with a great picture, lots of programming, and a fatter wallet.

Visit http://tvfool.com     and run a report for your address to see what channels should be available to you, where they are, and what antenna will pull them in for you.
See what programming is available on those channels at http://titantv.com.    

The thing you will miss most about cable is your DVR. Recording programs for sure, but also pause and rewind ("What'd she say?"). Tivo is probably the best OTA DVR, but pretty expensive with a lifetime service plan. You can still find the venerable echostar DTVpal DVR (or it's channel master clones) on eBay. echostar and channel master are going to release a new DVR that combines OTA with OTT...

http://thebeersoncomcast.wordpress.com/2013/08/21/echostar-to-release-two-new-ota-dvrs/    




 

  oh cool i just happeen to have a TIVO 1 that i got at goodwill for $20 and guess what, it 's LIFTIME! 

I'm going to go with this one. Picks up both UHF/VHF, is amplified, and has a remote to rotate. Plus a 15% off coupon !
LINK

if anyone is interested, I just got a note from EchoStar on the new DVRs. There will be two models. One will have internal storage PLUS usb storage and the other will be usb only. Both will include a program guide and are going to be available this fall! I am SO excited.

http://thebeersoncomcast.wordpress.com/2013/08/21/echostar-dvr-d...

wizwor said:   The thing you will miss most about cable is your DVR.  
 
The thing you will miss most will be the cable channel programming not available on broadcast and streaming.

National live sports on E.S.P.N., NASCAR on T.N.T./FOX SPORTS and even sports events shown on delay on cable are not available on free broadcast and free streaming.

Also, the in-depth sports discussion shows on cable and live press conferences on sports channels will be missed.

Live cable news of Fox CNN, MSNBC and now Al Jazeera America are not available, although there is Sky News, Huff Post and part-time Fox Live (the Fox News Channel is different).

On free streaming, there is often only the first 2 seasons of a classic TV mega hit series. But on cable, they tend to rerun complete series.

dtatha said:   
wizwor said:   The thing you will miss most about cable is your DVR. 
  
I have decided to go with a Dell Refurb Win 7 for HTPC ($140) and Silicondust TV Tuner ($60) - $200 gave me a good DVR and access to Netflix. Windows Media Center is a robust system, may not be the most feature rich one. But it is enough and hassle free to watch TV and Netflix

 Same here, I have been using Windows MC since the XP version years ago, first with a couple of different tuner cards/sticks, but have been using Silicon Dust network tuner for a couple years. We get around 60 stations in downtown Orlando; granted, a couple dozen are religious stations, but still enough other variety for us. We couldn't care less about sports, never watched in our house. I do miss CNN and  full-time news occasionally, but there is always the internet for news.

MC is a very nice, stable system with a nice GUI and using the network tuner means I can sit by the pool and watch TV on a laptop over wireless .

I too cut the cord a year ago.  I recommend the Clearstream 2V over the 2 for improved VHF reception.  The 2V can be found on eBay for $59.
My configuration:
1) Silocone dust 2 tuner using Windows Media Center and multiple media center extender boxes to record and play shows in multiple rooms
2) optional: Supplement with Hulu Plus and Amazon Prime.
3) optional: purchased TVPAD to get Chinese channels.

This resulted in $147 a month savings, dropped DirecTV which I had been a loyal customer for over 15 years.  Couldn't be happier.
Note:  You will suffer relative to Sports

JiggleTheHandle said:   
wizwor said:   The thing you will miss most about cable is your DVR.  
 
The thing you will miss most will be the cable channel programming not available on broadcast and streaming.

National live sports on E.S.P.N., NASCAR on T.N.T./FOX SPORTS and even sports events shown on delay on cable are not available on free broadcast and free streaming.

Also, the in-depth sports discussion shows on cable and live press conferences on sports channels will be missed.

Live cable news of Fox CNN, MSNBC and now Al Jazeera America are not available, although there is Sky News, Huff Post and part-time Fox Live (the Fox News Channel is different).

On free streaming, there is often only the first 2 seasons of a classic TV mega hit series. But on cable, they tend to rerun complete series.

Some will.  My sports viewing is mostly NFL, so not so much for me, but no doubt NBA, MLB, and NHL fans will be disappointed.  You can buy the games, but the services tend to blackout local games (aka your teams' games) anyway.  Thanks for pointing that out.  Green for you!

KMASOCAL said:   I'm going to go with this one. Picks up both UHF/VHF, is amplified, and has a remote to rotate. Plus a 15% off coupon !
LINK 

 I have a similar model, if it is like the one I have; it brings in a strong signal, but the rotation is fairly worthless. No calibration/indication of the rotation, so unless you can see out your window to the antenna, no way to tell the direction.

Channel Master is offering 15% off on antennas with the code RestoreCBS

http://blog.channelmaster.com/2013/08/channel-master-continues-t...

wizwor said:   Secret to successfully transition to broadcast is the antenna. Putting the right antenna in the right place and pointing it correctly will provide most with a great picture, lots of programming, and a fatter wallet.

Visit http://tvfool.com   and run a report for your address to see what channels should be available to you, where they are, and what antenna will pull them in for you.
See what programming is available on those channels at http://titantv.com.  

The thing you will miss most about cable is your DVR. Recording programs for sure, but also pause and rewind ("What'd she say?"). Tivo is probably the best OTA DVR, but pretty expensive with a lifetime service plan. You can still find the venerable echostar DTVpal DVR (or it's channel master clones) on eBay. echostar and channel master are going to release a new DVR that combines OTA with OTT...

http://thebeersoncomcast.wordpress.com/2013/08/21/echostar-to-release-two-new-ota-dvrs/  
 

  GREAT INFO - now, I just need to see what the HOA says about putting a roof mounted antenna on the house - I wonder if the FCC rules trump HOA for antenna just like the satellite dishes???

wizwor said:   
JiggleTheHandle said:   
wizwor said:   The thing you will miss most about cable is your DVR.  
 
The thing you will miss most will be the cable channel programming not available on broadcast and streaming.

National live sports on E.S.P.N., NASCAR on T.N.T./FOX SPORTS and even sports events shown on delay on cable are not available on free broadcast and free streaming.

Also, the in-depth sports discussion shows on cable and live press conferences on sports channels will be missed.

Live cable news of Fox CNN, MSNBC and now Al Jazeera America are not available, although there is Sky News, Huff Post and part-time Fox Live (the Fox News Channel is different).

On free streaming, there is often only the first 2 seasons of a classic TV mega hit series. But on cable, they tend to rerun complete series.

Some will.  My sports viewing is mostly NFL, so not so much for me, but no doubt NBA, MLB, and NHL fans will be disappointed.  You can buy the games, but the services tend to blackout local games (aka your teams' games) anyway.  Thanks for pointing that out.  Green for you!

  
Local games issue could be solved by using VPN.  Although that would cost about $10/month extra, but its worth it.

lemonhead said:   
wizwor said:   Secret to successfully transition to broadcast is the antenna. Putting the right antenna in the right place and pointing it correctly will provide most with a great picture, lots of programming, and a fatter wallet.

Visit http://tvfool.com    and run a report for your address to see what channels should be available to you, where they are, and what antenna will pull them in for you.
See what programming is available on those channels at http://titantv.com.   

The thing you will miss most about cable is your DVR. Recording programs for sure, but also pause and rewind ("What'd she say?"). Tivo is probably the best OTA DVR, but pretty expensive with a lifetime service plan. You can still find the venerable echostar DTVpal DVR (or it's channel master clones) on eBay. echostar and channel master are going to release a new DVR that combines OTA with OTT...

http://thebeersoncomcast.wordpress.com/2013/08/21/echostar-to-release-two-new-ota-dvrs/   

 

  GREAT INFO - now, I just need to see what the HOA says about putting a roof mounted antenna on the house - I wonder if the FCC rules trump HOA for antenna just like the satellite dishes???

  HOA can't say anything -- you are protected by federal law

http://www.fcc.gov/guides/over-air-reception-devices-rule
FCC said: The rule (47 C.F.R. Section 1.4000) has been in effect since October 1996, and it prohibits restrictions that impair the installation, maintenance or use of antennas used to receive video programming. The rule applies to video antennas including direct-to-home satellite dishes that are less than one meter (39.37") in diameter (or of any size in Alaska), TV antennas, and wireless cable antennas. The rule prohibits most restrictions that: (1) unreasonably delay or prevent installation, maintenance or use; (2) unreasonably increase the cost of installation, maintenance or use; or (3) preclude reception of an acceptable quality signal.

Effective January 22, 1999, the Commission amended the rule so that it also applies to rental property where the renter has an exclusive use area, such as a balcony or patio.

On October 25, 2000, the Commission further amended the rule so that it applies to customer-end antennas that receive and transmit fixed wireless signals. This amendment became effective on May 25, 2001.


Restrictions are allowed, but you cannot be prohibited from erecting an antenna that does not pose a safety risk.  bring the rule when you discuss the matter with the landlord.  Be a good neighbor.
 

i cut the cable for 5 years now. i do have to say hdtv antennas don't like cold or rain. I live in NorCal so the weather is not to bad. I have gone through 3 antenna now. 2 were a phillips http://www.amazon.com/Philips-SDV2940-27-Digital-Outdoor/dp/B001... . great for 25 miles and only 30 bucks. I also have a monitor that I just hooked up a hdtv converter box and with a kinda dvr built in. http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00BFIJQ10/ref=oh_details_o02_s... The price does change on this product often. I have not tried dvr yet. all is all I am happy about not having the cable bill. If you search you can just about find anything that you watched online. I also have at&t dsl 10mbs down and 1 up. so all I pay is $15 for and now and Netflix $8 and my daughters uses it mostly at college. total out of pocket $100investment 1st month and now $28 total with taxes Net saved about 3500 for 5 years. which that money invested in my daughters college!!
Happy Trails,
Michael

jaimelobo said:   
KMASOCAL said:   I'm going to go with this one. Picks up both UHF/VHF, is amplified, and has a remote to rotate. Plus a 15% off coupon !
LINK  

 I have a similar model, if it is like the one I have; it brings in a strong signal, but the rotation is fairly worthless. No calibration/indication of the rotation, so unless you can see out your window to the antenna, no way to tell the direction.

  Use a compass and the tvfool link to know which way to point it.

I live 55 miles from the transmitters and these type of antennas never seem to work for me. I haven't tried this particular model though. Recently put up a small yagi style with a Winegard 8700 preamp. Pulls in the 2 networks I can't get via DISH (they have an ongoing dispute with the provider). Cost me about $10 more than this deal.

I used to get all the networks via Comcast clear QAM (I paid for them). They started scrambling them a few months ago. In order to use their boxes I'd have to get a couple HDMI switches, or new TV's. No thanks.

wizwor said:   Visit http://tvfool.com   and run a report for your address to see what channels should be available to you, where they are, and what antenna will pull them in for you.
See what programming is available on those channels at http://titantv.com. 
 

  or try antennaweb.org

busyryan said:   
jaimelobo said:   
KMASOCAL said:   I'm going to go with this one. Picks up both UHF/VHF, is amplified, and has a remote to rotate. Plus a 15% off coupon !
LINK    

 I have a similar model, if it is like the one I have; it brings in a strong signal, but the rotation is fairly worthless. No calibration/indication of the rotation, so unless you can see out your window to the antenna, no way to tell the direction.

  Use a compass and the tvfool link to know which way to point it.

A compass has nothing to do with it, you're missing the point of the motor.

It's not for initial installation (you can just manually align an antenna into postion), the (supposed) reason for a motor on an antenna is change direction on the fly - if you live somewhere with broadcast sources in multiple directions. Without a good calibration/feedback system on the antenna, you can't sit in your living room and realign the antenna.

In fact, the motor could be a disadvantage, if someone decides to push the button on the controller, just to "see what it does" and you now have an antenna that is pointing in a random direction. I disconnected the motor on my antenna.

skh12 said:     pretty much common knowledge OTA is uncompressed, cable/sat/iptv all use compression based on available or allocated bandwidth to get you all those worthless channels

 

  
Uncompressed HDTV is nominally 1.485 Gbps while terrestial broadcast tops out around 18 Mbps.  I believe that's for the entire channel, and subchannels are often extrememly compressed.  Possibly better than cable and dish, but not "uncompressed". 

Kirkwan said:   1) Silocone dust 2 tuner using Windows Media Center and multiple media center extender boxes to record and play shows in multiple rooms

 

  Care to explain further on the media center extender boxes that you use for the multiple rooms.

There are so many options available for cutting the cord.  FW needs a thread devoted to this topic for the noobs like me who are trying to learn.  I recently cancelled Direct TV because they refused to offer me any type of retention deal.  I tried OTA with a few indoor antennas, but could not get a signal on the VHF channels. CBS and ABC. I am temporarily with Cox economy $25 until I come up with a better solution. I wish that CNN, HLN, Fox would stream live or cut a deal with Netflix.

crazyal said:   
Kirkwan said:   1) Silocone dust 2 tuner using Windows Media Center and multiple media center extender boxes to record and play shows in multiple rooms


 

  Care to explain further on the media center extender boxes that you use for the multiple rooms.

  Most people use XBoxes as extenders, but there are dedicated MCEs as well.

Can someone share tips or advice on using OTA antennas in a garden apartment?

I would love to cut the cable but my wife would miss FOX NEWS and just might do me in. So, I think I am stuck.

billmcdan said:   I would love to cut the cable but my wife would miss FOX NEWS and just might do me in. So, I think I am stuck.
  Problem solved
http://www.hulu.com/companies/76

TiredOfTaxes said:   Can someone share tips or advice on using OTA antennas in a garden apartment?
  Rabbit ear type antennas are fine and cost around $10-$20 or so.

wilked said:   
billmcdan said:   I would love to cut the cable but my wife would miss FOX NEWS and just might do me in. So, I think I am stuck.
  Problem solved
http://www.hulu.com/companies/76 

  That's still not live TV though.

billmcdan said:   I would love to cut the cable but my wife would miss FOX NEWS and just might do me in. So, I think I am stuck.
  
I can tell you that your personal serenity will grow exponentially if you do not have access to 7x24 news.  That said, a $50 Roku will get you access to all the cable news services and some other stuff.  Generally, it's not live, but most of the programs are available as collections of videos -- exactly what is available on their web site.  I like Fox and Friends, so I choose the first episode from the most recent airing and choose Play All.  Fox streams continuously until I stop it.  

My sage advice to you is to grab a Roku and see what the wife thinks BEFORE cutting the cable.  I HIGHLY recommend a Roku 2 XS refurb...

http://thebeersoncomcast.wordpress.com/2013/03/09/time-to-buy-a-roku/
http://bensoutlet.com/products/roku-2-xs-streaming
 

Skipping 26 Messages...
squanderer said:   is this better than a regular tv antenna? (see pic) i used to have one on the roof but never had a good reception..(that was before hdtv)..  have things improved? i would like to cut my cable off..
  It depends on your geographic location and what you want to view. The picure if for a combo UHF/VHF antenna and will work great for some locations and not for others. Enter your address into tvfool and determine what type of channels you're interested in (UHF and/or VHF) and the typical signal strenght at your location. You may be able to use a simple antenna or you might need something complex due to multi-channel or distance from the transmitters.

Dano



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