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rated:
¾ Carat Certified Round Cut Diamond 14K White Gold Solitaire Engagement Ring for $899.99Stone: ¾ CTW Round Diamond 
Diamond Color: F-G
Diamond Clarity: VS2
Size: 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9
Metal: 14K White Gold
Style: Diamond Engagement Ring

http://1sale.com/jewelry/rings/sr4-75w/  

Looks good according to the size, clarity and color of diamond. Who bought diamond ring from 1Sale.com
 

1Sale.com
See 1Sale.com discounts that earn 1.5% FatWallet Cash Back.
Member Summary

Ā¾ Carat Diamond (81.69kB)
Thanks djrsn00
Disclaimer

Unfortunately I have some knowledge about this.

 I would only buy rings certified by GIA.
 
 Other labs have very lose guidelines in regards to how to rate a diamond.
  

A real F-G grade will look white in a white gold setting, and white gold is a demanding test of color purity. A yellow gold setting will tend to hide the more yellow H, I, J, K diamond colors, because the yellow gold throws a lot of yellow into the diamond anyway. Diamonds are very susceptible to being judged by their surroundings.

So if 1Sale is pushing the envelope, white gold isn't the mount to do it with. If you take it down to a jewelry store and compare it to a known F-G in identical lighting, you'll probably be able to distinguish if there's a 2 or 3 notch discrepancy. Even pros have a hard time distinguishing a one-notch difference in well controlled situations.

GIA is reliable, other labs may fudge a bit. The difference in value between grades is 10-20% for each notch. I'm guessing for a 3/4 ct diamond it's the lower 10% number that is more applicable.

That said, in this economy, gold has shot up of course, and there won't typically be a heavy gold setting. On the other hand, diamonds are a spectacular value (pun intended), as their value has dropped nearly 1/3 in the last 5 or so years due to lack of demand.

Congratulations!


lexcurat said:   A real F-G grade will look white in a white gold setting, and white gold is a demanding test of color purity. A yellow gold setting will tend to hide the more yellow H, I, J, K diamond colors, because the yellow gold throws a lot of yellow into the diamond anyway. Diamonds are very susceptible to being judged by their surroundings.

So if 1Sale is pushing the envelope, white gold isn't the mount to do it with. If you take it down to a jewelry store and compare it to a known F-G in identical lighting, you'll probably be able to distinguish if there's a 2 or 3 notch discrepancy. Even pros have a hard time distinguishing a one-notch difference in well controlled situations.

GIA is reliable, other labs may fudge a bit. The difference in value between grades is 10-20% for each notch. I'm guessing for a 3/4 ct diamond it's the lower 10% number that is more applicable.

That said, in this economy, gold has shot up of course, and there won't typically be a heavy gold setting. On the other hand, diamonds are a spectacular value (pun intended), as their value has dropped nearly 1/3 in the last 5 or so years due to lack of demand.

Congratulations!

  
Also, the certificate does not include:
- Cut (Not shape): This is the most important aspect of a diamond.  Since they do not mention the quality of the cut you should assume that it is sub par)
- Polish
- Symmetry
- Fluorescence  (This can significantly decrease the value of a diamond)

Also, the clarity is rated as VS2:
- Therefore, based on GIA this could easily be I1  (You can see imperfections in the diamond with the naked eye)
    -  I say it can be I1 because some manufacturers have their diamonds inspected by labs different to GIA in order to get the rating they "want".

Other thing to consider:
- You will not be able to trade your diamond at 100% of its original cost in the future  (In case you want to upgrade to a better diamond) (Since you are not buying from a jewelry store)
- Diamonds that are not rated by GIA are a lot cheaper so if you want to sell it in the future you might just get a fraction of the cost back.


In summary, I if you want to stay around this price, buy a smaller diamond certified by GIA that could be upgraded in the future.

A good option for online purchases is www.bluenile.com    (They are a lot cheaper than most jewelry stores and they do not collect sales taxe in most states)

f2000sa said:   Is this one better? 1Carat    $899
  The center stone is .65ctw
The stones around add up to the remaining ctw (Tiny diamonds are inexpensive)

Try to stay with diamonds certified by GIA if you want to be able to sell/trade them in the future.

Totally agree with Xpolarx.

A 3/4 ct diamond is a pretty sizeable rock for a novice to be buying.  Go smaller and assure yourself of appropriate quality for the money, or with your honey's approval, even consider a high quality CZ.

The $6400 engagement ring I last bought is sitting in her deposit box, last I heard...   Don't break the budget over this decision in other words.

If its a diamond solitaire, my personal preference would be a princess cut diamond. But I think a princess cut might be a bit more expensive. My engagement ring isn't a solitaire but the setting is made up of multiple tiny diamonds shaped like a princess cut. This made it a lot less expensive but just as beautiful as a solitaire. And along with the multiple tiny diamond setting, we got wedding bands from junojewerly.com   that also had multiple tiny diamonds to match my engagement ring.

As others have said, anything other than GIA and you may as well grade it yourself and do up a fancy cert with crayons. Diamonds are all a lost cause in terms of retaining value. I haven't attempted to sell one yet but I'd like to think that something that has a GIA cert has to retain some value. I like BlueNile, even if you aren't buying from them you can get an idea of what retail value should be for a stone.

Right now a 2/3rds carat stone with a good cut, G and VS2 is about $2k. What's the math on it in terms of retaining value? I really don't know. So you buy a $1k ring that you might be able to sell for 200-300 bucks in the future is about a 70-80% loss. You buy a $2k diamond which retains better value so maybe you only lose 40% ... it's the same $700-$800 loss.



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