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$8.97 each
3M Micro Allergen Filtrete Filter
#471129
by Filtrete

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Most Recent Posts
Wow I learned a wealth of info here on filters. I used to use those cheapos until the Consumer Reports article, but I t... (more)

hazardous (Nov. 02, 2005 @ 3:17p) |

sklar said: <blockquote><hr>stealindeals said: <blockquote><hr>sklar said: <blockquote><hr>A number of tests on these fi... (more)

joey791 (Nov. 02, 2005 @ 5:30p) |

blueiedgod said: <blockquote><hr>sklar said: <blockquote><hr><br>Google is your friend.<br><br>Consumer reports did inde... (more)

joey791 (Nov. 02, 2005 @ 5:31p) |

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$9 a pop for a filter...........I'll pass
and stick to changing mine every month with the el cheapos.

i like the 3M filters, but arent they usually around this price anyway? cant remember what i paid for them last time though - were on a good sale so i bought quite a few...

YankeeRedneck said: [Q]$9 a pop for a filter...........I'll pass
and stick to changing mine every month with the el cheapos.

I've been really pleased with the reusable filters I've had for the past several years -- every month or two I remove them, spray them off in the shower or with the hose, let them dry for an hour, and stick 'em back in.

I've never really subscribed to the theory that you can improve the quality of air in your house via your furnace filter, because every time you open the front door, you just let in more micro-dust. A furnace filter is really just designed to keep dust from ruining the inside of your furnace and as long as it does that you're ahead of the game. I'd rather spend the money on a good central vacuum system that exhausts to the outside.


There was a $3 rebate for these in the 9/25/2005 coupon inserts in the sunday papers.


these are great you can use these filters for your cars' cabin filters.

Say a plain old charcoal filter on my audi is like $25 at the dealer. Straight up activated charcoal to keep the outside air smelling better. I can get a big hepa filter from Home Depot and make 3-4 similarily sized (as in correct fitment) out of one of these and get better filtration and i even tested the air flow it is similar so it doesnt cause condensation buildup or anything goofy.

when i first saw $25 for a cabin fresh air filter and then saw it i was hell no. $25 for a $2 square bag of charcoal lol.

as I have mentioned before my furnice guy told me not to put these types of filters in my furnace and when they see them in furnaces and there are problems they have the right to void the warranty. not saying its for all but do check the fine print or at least make sure to switch them out when the repair man comes

Funny.. my house inspector and local gas inspector and furnace inspector told me to use these. These are on sale for this price at Target this week, and they have a free 3M microfiber cloth in them, as well as a $1.50 coupon for the ultra allergen filter and $1 off Benadryl.

well keep a cheap blue one next to the furnace so when they come out to service it you put it back to stock lol.

dang thats the same filter been on there for 5 years, no dust. amazing!

lol.

You can get a box of six Nordic Pure MERV 12 filters (they are equivalent to the Filtrete Ultra filters) for $49.95 (free ship, no tax for most)

That's $8.33 each for an air filter that filters out smaller particles than the Filterete filter offered for $8.97 at HD.



Nordic Pure Filter

rigor said: [Q]these are great you can use these filters for your cars' cabin filters.

Say a plain old charcoal filter on my audi is like $25 at the dealer. Straight up activated charcoal to keep the outside air smelling better. I can get a big hepa filter from Home Depot and make 3-4 similarily sized (as in correct fitment) out of one of these and get better filtration and i even tested the air flow it is similar so it doesnt cause condensation buildup or anything goofy.

when i first saw $25 for a cabin fresh air filter and then saw it i was hell no. $25 for a $2 square bag of charcoal lol.

Awesome suggestion! Thanks!

The other cheap work-around for your car is if your a/c ducts start developing mold from condensation (as mine sometimes do in the summer time after I run the a/c on high and then park the car in the hot sun), you can spray a can of foaming bathroom cleaner in them instead of going to dealer and paying $150 for them to do roughly the same thing.

How come when I put a filter in my furnace the flow of air reduces dramatically through the vents in the upstairs and it takes a lot longer to warm up? The furnace is about 2 yrs old.

Sprintx said: [Q]How come when I put a filter in my furnace the flow of air reduces dramatically through the vents in the upstairs and it takes a lot longer to warm up? The furnace is about 2 yrs old.

It's because the filter restricts airflow. Your system should be designed to take that into account. It's a trade off: slightly less efficiency in return for cleaner air and less system maintenance.

those 3m purple filters create a very large pressure drop on the system - ie higher load on the blower motor... I opt for frequent changes of less restrictive filters. Do an experiment... pull the filter while the system is punning... then put it back. Listen for the change in the blower motor.

Thanks OP! I couldn't find 14X18X1.
Any idea where can I find this odd size? None of my local HomeDepot carry this size.

A number of tests on these filters have shown that most of them (excepting the higher end filtretes that cost ~$15 severely restrict airflow and perform minimal filtration of the air. The furnace/AC unit simply doesnt run enough to perform adequate filtration.

Further, the reduced airflow is NOT something that the average heating/ac unit is meant to handle. You may suffer a cracked heat exchanger from an overheated unit that isnt getting enough air flow and/or freezing of the compressor for the same reason.

Some heating/ac units WILL kick up their fan speed if they arent drawing enough air. You CAN run the fan full time on your furnace to provide more adequate air flow. Problem is, most particles are nearer the floor than the ceiling and most furnace inlets are mounted in the ceiling. Further, the amount of electricity used by the higher fan speed or constantly running the furnace fan would be better spent on a decent quality room air filter.

Now, for the ghetto el cheapo air filter? Get a decent 20" energy star box fan that has the control on top and the electric wire coming out of the bottom (not in the middle of the back of the fan) and duct tape one of these filtrete 20" square filters to the air intake side. Place in a central location in the house and turn on low and let it run. As good or better than an expensive room filtration system, no strain on your furnace, lower electric costs, easy and cheap to replace the filter every few months.


Thanks OP.

sklar said: [Q]A number of tests on these filters have shown that most of them (excepting the higher end filtretes that cost ~$15 severely restrict airflow and perform minimal filtration of the air. The furnace/AC unit simply doesnt run enough to perform adequate filtration.

Further, the reduced airflow is NOT something that the average heating/ac unit is meant to handle. You may suffer a cracked heat exchanger from an overheated unit that isnt getting enough air flow and/or freezing of the compressor for the same reason.

Some heating/ac units WILL kick up their fan speed if they arent drawing enough air. You CAN run the fan full time on your furnace to provide more adequate air flow. Problem is, most particles are nearer the floor than the ceiling and most furnace inlets are mounted in the ceiling. Further, the amount of electricity used by the higher fan speed or constantly running the furnace fan would be better spent on a decent quality room air filter.

Now, for the ghetto el cheapo air filter? Get a decent 20" energy star box fan that has the control on top and the electric wire coming out of the bottom (not in the middle of the back of the fan) and duct tape one of these filtrete 20" square filters to the air intake side. Place in a central location in the house and turn on low and let it run. As good or better than an expensive room filtration system, no strain on your furnace, lower electric costs, easy and cheap to replace the filter every few months.

You wanna post a link to the "number of tests". Your furnace should be fine, just as long as you change your filters at least every 3 months. In fact Consumer Reports reported these filters are extremely good at filtering the air.

okay, i knew i had these filters, but i also paid alot less.

target had these on clearance before for $1.75 (75% off 7.99). i also have a stack of lysol brand filters i got for $2.50 (reg. $10). these are not currently on clearance at target, but this is a heads up to everyone that target puts their furnance filters on clearance every year. i don't remember which months, but i walk thru target every week so i buy them whenever i see them on clearance. i still have about 10 new filters. i have 2 ac/heat units and change the filters every 3 months.

I do commercial a/c work for a living and I dont recommend these.

As others have stated you are better off with the 99 cent cheapo filters, if your return air is at floor level run this test, turn the fan to on, open return, take the filtrete filter set the bottom end in the return grill, let go of the top end, if the filter is being sucked to the return air grill you have too much of a restriction.

Jones-the type of reusable filters you have we call "compressor killers", they restrict even more than the filtrete, also I have seen spotless houses that the minimum they can go without washing is every 2 weeks-run this test, take your filter outside and wash it, let it dry, then turn towards the sun and hold the filter between the sun and your face, 9 times out of 10 the continuous washing of these filters end up pushing all dirt and debris to the center of the filter, see if you can see any sunlight through it.

i'd like to see more proof of how bad these mid grade filters are.

In my old apartment they'd change the ancient gas furnace filter about 1nce every 6 months. It was like coated with nastiness. They didnt let us unlock the door to do it ourselves.

Now with my house i have better than blue filters, and a reminder system every 90 days. The filters hardly even dirty. I question why i'm changing them so early, but i do.

The question is maybe there is generalizations here.. perhaps people who let their systems clog up with all the junk that passes through the cheaper filters. which does end up polluting the air, the ducting, and everything in between, would that not just do as much damage as well?

i could care less if i have to replace my ish in 10 years versus 15.. but if i have allergies for those 10-15 years i would care.

cost of living a better life, worth it to me. maybe not to you.

but thanks i'll keep blue filters around so when something fails, i'll swap in the original brand new one and they cannot deny the claim. excellent tip.


I used these filters for several years.

Filtrete filter 1

Blower motor 0

Furnace repairman said the blower motor would have lasted years longer if it wasn't for the restrictive filter.

ouch, tough lesson to learn. <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-frown.gif" border=0>

thanks op

I've used the "red" label 3M Filtrete (Micro Allergen) for years and they helped my allergies a bunch. This was true even when I lived in an apartment and had smoke seeping in from the other units.

I now use their "purple" label ones (Ultra Allergen) which make a marked improvement on dust in the house too. I have allergies to both molds and dust and couldn't make it without these. I also have asthma so I'm very sensitive to air quality.

When a repairman saw them in my furnace at my 12 yr old house he commented on saying they were the best. He was in just for a cleaning prior to winter and not for any problems. I used them over there for the full 12 years that I lived there and kept the fan running all the time.

The purple label one has less air restriction than the red one. That along with its better performance keeps me as a customer. I have a very high efficiency furnace in my current house and "just to be sure" I change the filter every 2 months instead of 3 months. It never looks dirty and I can always see the basement light bulbs through the ones I'm removing. (3M suggests this as a test for knowing when to change filters - once you can't see the light bulb; the filter needs to be changed.)

They do cost a bit more than I'd like, but I just watch for sales and rebates and buy several months worth at a time. This is one area where I'm willing to pay more for something; they help me breathe and cost less than extra Dr. appointments and Rx's.. They truly do make a difference for me.

The studies on the poor quality of indoor air (go to the epa gov site) and quite shocking. These filters help and anything to help is worth it for my needs. I'll go check out the competitor listed above, but Consumer Reports consistently lists the Filtrete filters as tops each year that I've looked and suggest these with your fan left on vs room air cleaners.

For info


http://www.epa.gov/iaq/pubs/insidest.html
http://www.3m.com/us/home_leisure/filtrete/40_products.jhtml, and

Guys and gals,

I know this is going to sound crazy but i've looked 3 separate times now on my gas heater and CANNOT find where a filter is or would go. The gas heater is not very old (under 10years), and everytime i read these threads I go down to the basement and prod around, but cannot find where the filter would be. Help please! And thanks from the heater guy for his opinion on these more restrictive filters.

justin

Is your furnace standing up in the basement or on its side?

7Enigma said: [Q]Guys and gals,

I know this is going to sound crazy but i've looked 3 separate times now on my gas heater and CANNOT find where a filter is or would go. The gas heater is not very old (under 10years), and everytime i read these threads I go down to the basement and prod around, but cannot find where the filter would be. Help please! And thanks from the heater guy for his opinion on these more restrictive filters.

justinFind out if your utility does free inspections.

In CA the major utility is PG&E and they will come out to light your pilot for free. (Hint, hint, your pilot just went out...)

At the same time they will do a cursory inspection to make sure nothing is dangerous. As long as you are there for the pilot lighting, I am SURE they will point out your filter for you.

Note that some wall furnaces and some convection floor furnaces do not have filters (because they do not have blowers.) Does your furnace have a blower?


For state of CA fiberglass particles found in AC ducts are known to cause cancer.
The el chepo ones are made of fiberglass...

check our intake or the intake duct in the house. Some time they will have the filter installed there!

I couldn't find el-cheap 14x20x1 at Wal-Mart so I ended up paying $9 for one at HD.

I just bought my house so this was the first time I had to change out the filter. I'm going to have to find a place that carries the el-cheapo ones for $.88 a piece and stock up.

Janata said: [Q]For state of CA fiberglass particles found in AC ducts are known to cause cancer.
The el chepo ones are made of fiberglass...

Yeah everything we use from chill water pipe insulation to units have the may cause cancer in CA warning on them, thankfully Im in LA <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-tongue.gif" border=0>

joey791 said: [Q]Jones-the type of reusable filters you have we call "compressor killers", they restrict even more than the filtrete, also I have seen spotless houses that the minimum they can go without washing is every 2 weeks-run this test, take your filter outside and wash it, let it dry, then turn towards the sun and hold the filter between the sun and your face, 9 times out of 10 the continuous washing of these filters end up pushing all dirt and debris to the center of the filter, see if you can see any sunlight through it.

Interesting -- thanks for the advice. I'll check with my HVAC guy and see what he says, and I'll also do some air flow comparisons with these and other filters.

NorCalSci said: [Q]7Enigma said: [Q]Guys and gals,

I know this is going to sound crazy but i've looked 3 separate times now on my gas heater and CANNOT find where a filter is or would go. The gas heater is not very old (under 10years), and everytime i read these threads I go down to the basement and prod around, but cannot find where the filter would be. Help please! And thanks from the heater guy for his opinion on these more restrictive filters.

justinFind out if your utility does free inspections.

In CA the major utility is PG&E and they will come out to light your pilot for free. (Hint, hint, your pilot just went out...)

At the same time they will do a cursory inspection to make sure nothing is dangerous. As long as you are there for the pilot lighting, I am SURE they will point out your filter for you.

Note that some wall furnaces and some convection floor furnaces do not have filters (because they do not have blowers.) Does your furnace have a blower?

I don't think it has a blower. It is radiator heated so water gets pumped throughout the house into the radiators. There is a small motor that looks like an alternator that I imagine is he pump (I wouldn't call this a blower right?). And I don't see an intake valve/pipe anywhere, just a gas line coming in, water lines coming out, and the exhaust pipe to the chimney. Sorry folks for all the stupid questions, but I'm really stumped (and feel pretty confident that it actually does NOT have a filter on it).

justin

sklar said: [Q]A number of tests on these filters have shown that most of them (excepting the higher end filtretes that cost ~$15 severely restrict airflow and perform minimal filtration of the air. The furnace/AC unit simply doesnt run enough to perform adequate filtration.

Further, the reduced airflow is NOT something that the average heating/ac unit is meant to handle. You may suffer a cracked heat exchanger from an overheated unit that isnt getting enough air flow and/or freezing of the compressor for the same reason.

Some heating/ac units WILL kick up their fan speed if they arent drawing enough air. You CAN run the fan full time on your furnace to provide more adequate air flow. Problem is, most particles are nearer the floor than the ceiling and most furnace inlets are mounted in the ceiling. Further, the amount of electricity used by the higher fan speed or constantly running the furnace fan would be better spent on a decent quality room air filter.

Now, for the ghetto el cheapo air filter? Get a decent 20" energy star box fan that has the control on top and the electric wire coming out of the bottom (not in the middle of the back of the fan) and duct tape one of these filtrete 20" square filters to the air intake side. Place in a central location in the house and turn on low and let it run. As good or better than an expensive room filtration system, no strain on your furnace, lower electric costs, easy and cheap to replace the filter every few months.

Hey!!! I had that as my window fan, lol. It was black and sooty by then end of the summer, lol.

sklar said: [Q]A number of tests on these filters have shown that most of them (excepting the higher end filtretes that cost ~$15 severely restrict airflow and perform minimal filtration of the air. The furnace/AC unit simply doesnt run enough to perform adequate filtration.

Further, the reduced airflow is NOT something that the average heating/ac unit is meant to handle. You may suffer a cracked heat exchanger from an overheated unit that isnt getting enough air flow and/or freezing of the compressor for the same reason.

Some heating/ac units WILL kick up their fan speed if they arent drawing enough air. You CAN run the fan full time on your furnace to provide more adequate air flow. Problem is, most particles are nearer the floor than the ceiling and most furnace inlets are mounted in the ceiling. Further, the amount of electricity used by the higher fan speed or constantly running the furnace fan would be better spent on a decent quality room air filter.

Now, for the ghetto el cheapo air filter? Get a decent 20" energy star box fan that has the control on top and the electric wire coming out of the bottom (not in the middle of the back of the fan) and duct tape one of these filtrete 20" square filters to the air intake side. Place in a central location in the house and turn on low and let it run. As good or better than an expensive room filtration system, no strain on your furnace, lower electric costs, easy and cheap to replace the filter every few months.

Hey!!! I had that as my window fan, lol. It was black and sooty by then end of the summer, lol.

Slightly OT. Mine is a 3 year old house and I've tried all filters-from the cheapo ones to the most expensive ones, but still get a lot of dust in the house. Dust starts accumulating in like 2 days after cleaning/dusting. Any advice???

Skipping 14 Messages...
blueiedgod said: [Q]sklar said: [Q]
Google is your friend.

Consumer reports did indeed say the higher end filtretes were decent filters, but if you read the text I wrote they can only filter while the furnace is running. Might be fine in minnesota and buffalo where your furnace will run most of the time, not so hot in texas and california.

Further, your furnace probably will not be fine. Some manufacturers specify large enough intakes to offer substantial flow, or kick the fan to a higher speed to compensate. In the latter case, you're blowing a lot of electricity to do occasional, decent filtration.

I had a 6 year old Rheem unit crack its heat exchanger after using this type of filter. The repairman was mystified until he saw the filtrete filter. He had me run the furnace with and without the air cleaner in and showed me the temp difference of the heat exchanger. About double with the filter in. $800 to fix.

That would have bought me a lot of room air filters...

But if you like 'em, buy and use them. I'm sure your heating & air conditioning repair and replace guys will like you.

I have mine programmed to have the fan come on at least once every half hour for 10 minutes to mix up the air, whether the furnace is on or off. Don't use the same system for central air in TX or CA? So, either way you will have the system on for more than 10 minutes a day.

blue, by doing this all you are doing is throwing money away.



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