Chateau d'Yquem at costco.com

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vinouspleasure said: [Q]Lot of good information here and thoughtful debate. I have to disagree

vintage.....costco....best other price.....retailer
1997(1.5)..$649.99...$479.................JJ buckley
2000........$399.99...$139.99..............k&l wines
2003........$199.99...$189.99..............jj buckley

In addition to these for the most part being poorly priced,. I believe the K&L price is $239 for the comparable bottle and the $139 one is different. Go down the list to sauternes

many FW'ers have lots $$$, but we still like good deals. it's all about money well spent. thanks for the price comparison. all these retarded wines are at an all time high. i recommend passing on them. it's not money well spent. i had the 1999 sauternes and it was only 1 bill from costco a few years ago. 1994 d'yuem was medicore and it was on sale for 1 bill last year fro k&l. also, 2002 bordeaux 1st gru when release were one 1 bill costco. the 2003 bordeaux were jacked up to 3 bills.

in the meantime, stay put and drink australian, chilean, spanish, and argentinian wines. excellent wine for a fraction of the $$$.

[Q] I believe the K&L price is $239 for the comparable bottle and the $139 one is different. Go down the list to sauternes

yup, you're right, thanks, I've updated my post.

NY153 said: [Q]you can get a climate controlled cabinet for ~$200, that will fit ~8-10 bottles <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-smile.gif" border=0> I'd suggest investing in something else especially if you are still college. The appreciation of wine comes with age..

Kumarkid83 said: [Q]So, what is the best way to store this wine?
I have never even thought about buying such expensive wine (still in college!), but hell, my AMEX has been itching for a splurging this year, and the year is almost over!

Most all climate controlled cabinets for $200 are only temperature controlled, which is not sufficient. If you want to properly store a several hundred dollar bottle of d'Yquem (or any fine wine), the cabinet must have humidity controls as well, or you will risk ruining the wine quite quickly. A properly stored bottle of d'Yquem can be kept for 100+ years, but only if it's done right (and I really hope no one is buying this wine just to stick it on their wine rack next to the heating vent). You wouldn't store a box of Cohibas without making sure the humidity is controlled (in addition to temperature), and the same goes for wine.

accumulator said: [Q]I never would have believed that Yquem would become available at Costco.

A friend of mine once told me: "The average American pauper today lives with accoutrement approximating that of British royalty 100 years ago."


I think not.

[Q]
I don't think I can splurge on a bottle of Yquem right at the moment, but I appreciate the post, OP. To those of you who can afford it: Please, invite me over - I have some wonderful fois gras that I will cheefully share with you while helping you drink your bottle of Yquem...

this is a classic pairing. In true fatwallet spirit, its worth noting that you can get about 90% of the Chateau d'Yquem experience for about 1/4th the price with the 2003 Suiderat. A half bottle of that will set you back about $30. This is where the smart money is going for those of us that drink wine (as opposed to invest in it).

proc said: [Q]I am wondering if this post has found the right forum. <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-confused.gif" border=0>

If I am looking for a bottle of wine with a price tag of $600+ as bargain, would I still browse FW?

sure. that's how some of us would actually have the money to consider a $600 bottle of wine!

I totally agree on the Suiderat! An incredible bargain when it comes to quality Sauternes for drinking. Also check out Dom Ruinart before shelling out the ducats for a bottle of Dom Perignon Champagne. It is yet another case of being able to get 90% of the experience for around 1/4 of the price!

Overzeetop said: [Q]hfzeus said: [Q] I have a lot of ones from the 80's that have gone up 5 - 10 fold.

Aww, that's nothing. You chould have picked up a fix-er-upper in D.C. basck in the early 80s, or even better bought a few bucks of Microsoft stock. If I'd bought $10k in MS stock when I graduated HS in 1987 instead of spending my college money it on books, tuition, and beer in college, I'd have been worth several tens of millions of dollars.

If I had a time machine, I would be the best investor in the WORLD!

This wine is definitely one of the great dessert wines, IMO. I've been a bit soured on buying it here in the states because it's so much more expensive than buying it in France. I always bring a bottle or two back when I go there.

Usually buy my wines from here. Much cheaper then what I find outside and awesome rates. For people staying in Northern VA, DC, MD this is within reach. Seems like they ship as well

Link

Wineaux said: [Q]I totally agree on the Suiderat! An incredible bargain when it comes to quality Sauternes for drinking. Also check out Dom Ruinart before shelling out the ducats for a bottle of Dom Perignon Champagne. It is yet another case of being able to get 90% of the experience for around 1/4 of the price!

I am totally a wine novice just starting to get into wine. What is Suiderat? I'm trying to find it on wine sites (like bevmo and wineaccess) but can find it...can you send me a link or something please?

i totally don't get my hubby. we're not wealthy, but we love to try finer things when we can. i like wine, he likes cognac. but he thinks this chateau d'yquem is way overpriced.... for wine that is. all i can say is, it's only 1/3rd the cost of his louis XIII cognac. and why he can enjoy his very expensive cognac and say it's worth every penny and why i can't try 1 expensive bottle of wine to see if it worth every penny?


TrojanMan2003 said: [Q]Wineaux said: [Q]I totally agree on the Suiderat! An incredible bargain when it comes to quality Sauternes for drinking. Also check out Dom Ruinart before shelling out the ducats for a bottle of Dom Perignon Champagne. It is yet another case of being able to get 90% of the experience for around 1/4 of the price!

I am totally a wine novice just starting to get into wine. What is Suiderat? I'm trying to find it on wine sites (like bevmo and wineaccess) but can find it...can you send me a link or something please?

The correct spelling is Château Suduiraut. I just bought two bottles of the 2001 vintage, gave one to my brother for xmas, and kept the other for myself. I plan on putting it in the cellar for a minimum of 15 - 20 years before even thinking about opening it.

Here's a site that talks about the vineyard, as well as others in the Sauternes region: Wine Journal

linrick said: [Q]i totally don't get my hubby. we're not wealthy, but we love to try finer things when we can. i like wine, he likes cognac. but he thinks this chateau d'yquem is way overpriced.... for wine that is. all i can say is, it's only 1/3rd the cost of his louis XIII cognac. and why he can enjoy his very expensive cognac and say it's worth every penny and why i can't try 1 expensive bottle of wine to see if it worth every penny?
Selfish bastid.

C'mon over to my house and pick out any bottle you want.

<img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-tongue.gif" border=0>

linrick said: [Q]i totally don't get my hubby. we're not wealthy, but we love to try finer things when we can. i like wine, he likes cognac. but he thinks this chateau d'yquem is way overpriced.... for wine that is. all i can say is, it's only 1/3rd the cost of his louis XIII cognac. and why he can enjoy his very expensive cognac and say it's worth every penny and why i can't try 1 expensive bottle of wine to see if it worth every penny?

Hey Linny-

If you want to try expensive wine, start with the 100$ range. A nice vintage of Dom (1992) goes for about 125$ and is, IMHO, one of the best champagnes there is. Realize I may have tasted only 15 or so $100+ bottles and probably 40 or 50 $50+ bottles, but we were able to do a vertical (semi) tasting of the Doms- 1992, 1995, 1996? ? ? I forget them all now... but the 1992 stood out like a single yellow tulip in a field of red.

Many places make 'eiceweine' and there are a few places in California (I will get you the link if you'd like) that manufacture similiar, yet cheaper, wines. I would *hate* for you to buy a bottle and not like it- unless, of course, you're within 1 hour of Rochester NY in which case I would MORE than be willing to help you consume such precious nectar.

RayT said: [Q]I plan on putting it in the cellar for a minimum of 15 - 20 years before even thinking about opening it.



Wouldn't that suck if that turns into a very expensive bottle of vinegar after 20 years from a bad cork, etc? <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-tongue.gif" border=0>

purduephotog said: [Q]sygyzy said: [Q]purduephotog said: [Q]Damn.

For a case of that wine I could buy nearly 3 tons of grapes- 600 gallons- and make it myself.

Of course, I mean, since there is a limit of 200 gallons per household I wouldn't buy more than a ton, but...

Very interesting- I'd never even heard of this I'm assuming it's a straw-wine / eicewine ?

Admittedly I'm a wine noob, but your entire post is just ridiculous. What is a straw-wine? Do you mean strawberry wine or straw (hay) wine? It is not an icewine either but it is a dessert wine.

Sorry-

Straw wine is made when the whole grape clusters are laid out on straw and left to 'dehydrate' to raisin status- then they are pressed and the concentrated syrup/juice is fermented into a sweet dessert wine known for it's potent aroma. It is a variation on the manner of Eiceweine in climates that don't get cold enough to get freeze the grapes.

Just another techincal way of making wine....

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vin_de_Paille

I stand corrected. My apologies for calling your post rediculous.

So I take it that only a real wine afficionado would be able to appreciate this wine? Or would casual wine drinkers even be able to tell why this wine is superior?

I'm not knocking those who can afford to splurge on it, but $600 also buys a wheel barrow of tacos. <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-happy.gif" border=0> I'm guessing some people just feel it's worth it and others won't. But for purposes other than showing off with it, I don't think anything that will be recycled into urine tastes $600/bottle good.

mgdeals said: [Q]So I take it that only a real wine afficionado would be able to appreciate this wine? Or would casual wine drinkers even be able to tell why this wine is superior?

I'm not knocking those who can afford to splurge on it, but $600 also buys a wheel barrow of tacos. <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-happy.gif" border=0> I'm guessing some people just feel it's worth it and others won't. But for purposes other than showing off with it, I don't think anything that will be recycled into urine tastes $600/bottle good.

Unless you're well off and want to impress, or are a professional wino earning their stripes, skip this and stick with bottles under $30.

Personally I think the FW way of buying wine is direct from the smaller wineries after tasting their wines and picking out a few cases from favorites along the way. I would say a good comparable wine to this would be Bonny Doon Recioto http://www.bonnydoonvineyard.com/ ... it's actually on sale right now, too. You will need to leave it alone for a year or two if you want a better wine.

For those FW'ers in California, there's no reason to not go visit your local wine region and see if anything impresses you. Most wines directly from the wineries price pretty well, 80% will be in the $10-20 a bottle range, with a few in the $30-50 range. You will also learn years of knowledge about wine, often directly from the people who grow the grapes themselves. Why should you never buy champagne that has been in the bottle for more than three months? They will be happy to tell you.


Unless you're well off and want to impress, or are a professional wino earning their stripes, skip this and stick with bottles under $30.

Personally I think the FW way of buying wine is direct from the smaller wineries after tasting their wines and picking out a few cases from favorites along the way. I would say a good comparable wine to this would be Bonny Doon Recioto http://www.bonnydoonvineyard.com/ ... it's actually on sale right now, too. You will need to leave it alone for a year or two if you want a better wine.

For those FW'ers in California, there's no reason to not go visit your local wine region and see if anything impresses you. Most wines directly from the wineries price pretty well, 80% will be in the $10-20 a bottle range, with a few in the $30-50 range. You will also learn years of knowledge about wine, often directly from the people who grow the grapes themselves. Why should you never buy champagne that has been in the bottle for more than three months? They will be happy to tell you.

there's just so much misinformation here:

>> Unless you're well off and want to impress, or are a professional wino earning their stripes, skip this and stick with bottles under $30.

In fact, there is a sea of good wine for under $15. I would recommend sticking with bottles under $15.


>>Personally I think the FW way of buying wine is direct from the smaller wineries after tasting their wines and picking out a few cases from favorites along the way.

why is this the FW way? This would involve a trip for most people in the US. Most of the wine being produced in the US (and the rest of the world) is industrial crap. How is one to find the good wineries? The best way to learn about wine is a) form a relationship with a good retailer in your home town and b) read.

>> I would say a good comparable wine to this would be Bonny Doon Recioto

you think Bonny Doon Recioto is comparable to Château d'Yquem, the finest dessert wine in the world? Since the Recioto is made from Barbera and sauterne is made from Sémillon, Sauvignon Blanc, and Muscadelle, how is it comparable? Does the fact that the Recioto is a red wine and Château d'Yquem is a white wine come into play in your comparison?

>>Why should you never buy champagne that has been in the bottle for more than three months? They will be happy to tell you.

In fact, it impossible to buy vintage champagne that has been in the bottle for less than 3 months.


[Q]
If you want to try expensive wine, start with the 100$ range. A nice vintage of Dom (1992) goes for about 125$ and is, IMHO, one of the best champagnes there is. Realize I may have tasted only 15 or so $100+ bottles and probably 40 or 50 $50+ bottles, but we were able to do a vertical (semi) tasting of the Doms- 1992, 1995, 1996? ? ? I forget them all now... but the 1992 stood out like a single yellow tulip in a field of red.


lets try another:

If you want to try expensive wine, do NOT start with the $100 range. Ask a good retailer to recommend wine in different price ranges. If you like cabs, try two for under $20, two for under $30 and so on. See what you like...you might taste them blind to see if you can tell the difference.

Dom is indeed a very good champagne. Most people would say that 1992 is the weakest Dom vintage of the three you list. Additionally, to some extent you are paying for the Dom name in the same way that you pay for say a prada handbag.

vinouspleasure said: [Q][Q]I have some wonderful fois [sic] gras that I will cheefully share with you while helping you drink your bottle of Yquem...

this is a classic pairing. In true fatwallet spirit, its worth noting that you can get about 90% of the Chateau d'Yquem experience for about 1/4th the price with the 2003 Suiderat. A half bottle of that will set you back about $30.
ooo.. food talk... (i'm not so much of a vino anything but... foie.. yumm.) to demonstrate this pairing, I have a little pictorial here: Chicago Reader's anti-Foie Ban experiment. I was lucky enough to partake in this meal. 6 of us shared about a 1.5lb foie cooked 3 ways coupled w/ 2 half bottles of not-so-fancy sauternes. one of the recipes was used in the Live Tastefully program sponsored by Amstel Light.

while both of our half bottles were less than $20, the foie was the highlight of the night for me; i don't think even a $300 bottle of d'Yquem could've made the Hudson Valley foie 10x better than how it tasted that nite. but the Suduiraut rec is highly appreciate for the day Chicago revokes our stupid foie ban.



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