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I RECEIVED MINE TODAY. THEY ARE MADE IN INDIA. OBVIOUSLY SUBSTANDARD. Refuse delivery if you receive them, and print out the Tuesday Morning web page that references "Italian Craftshmanship."

I will be fighting with them. I even called the Nancy Koltes corporate office, and they told me everything they make is made in India. One of the companies is pulling a fast one.

==================

Tuesday Morning is a store, not a day. So, with that normal confusion out of the way...

And, if you're happy with your Big Lots sheets, stop reading here and go on to another deal listing...

Nancy Koltes is a very good brand, not your JC Penney, LNT or BBB stuff for the Great Unwashed. Nancy Koltes has just a handful of retail stores, with their flagship location in Beverly Hills.

Most major store chains lie about their thread counts, except for Penney's according to Consumer Reports, by the way; Koltes thread counts are accurate. 1000 thread count claims at discount web sites like Overstock and SmartBargains are usually false or exaggerated (see my second post below).

Koltes' retail site for comparisons: http://www.nancykoltesathome.com/catalog .

$10 shipping on each set, plus state tax (was $4.80 total for 2 king sets to GA).

Not available B&M. Order tracking is non-existent unless you call. No coupons are available. White on white stripe only. Includes fitted & standard sheets, 2 pillowcases.

From their marketing-speak:

HOTEL LUXURY LINENS FOR YOUR HOME BY NANCY KOLTES
Nancy Koltes Sheet Sets
Tuesday Morning Online-Only Price - $49.99 to $59.99

REGULAR RETAIL $135 to $155
(which is an accurate claim)
Queen Set - $49.99
King Set - $59.99
Cal King Set - $59.99

These Nancy Koltes 300 thread count sateen hotel collection linens fit up to 17" mattresses and are made of long staple cotton. These sets feature a white on white stripe and are offered only in Queen, King, and California King sizes.

Upholding the quality that distinguishes old world tradition and blending it with current trends and modern flavors, Nancy Koltes strives to capture the timeless beauty of the world’s finest fabrics and accessories for a lifetime of luxury and comfort.

Nancy Koltes was founded in 1984 by designer Nancy Koltes, a pioneer in introducing luxury linens to the American Market.

Nancy Koltes was the first to combine an American sensibility with Italian craftsmanship. The result is a luxurious collection in the finest natural fibers that captures the warmth and spirit of the American lifestyle.


Link

RETURNED GOODS FOR STORE CREDIT ONLY: by mail (you pay the freight) or to any Tuesday Morning B&M; unused, unpacked in original packaging.

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too much $ for 300 thread...

How about this one?

pmanager said: too much $ for 300 thread...

How about this one?


Read this:

Learning about fine bedding and linens is like learning about other fine things in life...fine wines, fine cigars, etc. Until you have used the finest products available, something truly exquisite, you simply do not have the knowledge for comparison. Referring to Overstock or 'cheapo' department store bedding as being even close to decent is ridiculous, an utter joke. Granted, at top department stores you may be able to locate decent bedding if you're paying the higher prices. But let's get real, there's no comparison to the finest Italian brands, none of which even the best department stores carry. In terms of consumer reviews, Overstock has the worst rating of any retailer. Anyone who really knows linens would turn pale hearing such a statement and think you a total fool if you ever repeated the statement in public.

If you're really investing in bedding, only the best Italian linens are worth considering. Equivalent quality just can't be found outside of the country and they have true thread counts. The Pratesi and Frette bed linens are among the best you can purchase. Same is true for the Venus Rising Limited brand which designers use because of the rich colors and masculine patterns that are hard to find. All of the Pratesi is Made in Italy and there are good patterns however Frette is different in that regard and not all of their things are Italian, with only their Italian lines worth considering for updating a bedroom. Anichini is a good brand but focuses on high-priced and mainly custom bedding. Their Hotel line is more reasonable but frankly not worth the price for the quality. The better Italian linens are elegant with good designs, but the prices can be very high for most of the items, especially when similar quality is often half the cost. Barbacci and Nancy Koltes are also good lines but the focus is on sheet sets, and blankets aren't available.

Do the research, read blogs and reviews endlessly, and know to start with Italian or you're just wasting your money. For the fools with statements such as 'I have had the cheapo department store stuff and it does stay soft,' let it serve as case in point that culture simply cannot be learned. You can lead a horse to water...

- http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/ny/top-ten/top-10-bedding-001286

Then get educated.

Consumer Reports: Thread Count ain't everything: If you think the higher the thread-count the better the sheet, Consumer Reports found that wasn't necessarily the case. One set of sheets promised a super-high thread count at 1,200 threads per inch, but they actually have around 400. A microscopic analysis shows there were 1,200 individual plies, not threads.

Comfort is a subjective thing and perceived differently by individuals.

I bought both 300 and 1000 thread count and I can tell you without getting my education from the eBay store as you suggested that 300 sheets will last you for a year and you might be able to see through them after that. 1000 count is a lot heavier fabric and will last for a long time.

Yes, you can always find cheaper with a higher thread count, but as the OP states, thread count alone is misleading (I've read the Consumer Reports article and it is very enlightening).
To each his own when it comes to comfort. I've splurged on the best Italian sheets (and most expensive) and find that paying top dollar really isn't necessary - but that's just me.

In any case, as most people know, Tuesday Morning is the "outlet" for Neiman Marcus and Horchow catalog items so even though this price may seem high to some, the quality with Tuesday Morning merchandise is always reliable and far better than what you can find elsewhere at comparable prices IMHO.
The deal may not be for everyone but I don't think it deserves red, either...

pmanager said: 1000 count is a lot heavier fabric and will last for a long time.That is incorrect. Actually, according to knowledgeable sources, anything above 400 "actual, authentic" thread count is a waste of money, and is often a marketing farce.

The Truth About Thread Count: "In a quality product, the incremental comfort value of increasing thread count over 300 is very little. A 300 thread count can feel far superior to a 1000 thread count."

If these are italian made sheets, then i'd say they're pretty good for that price.

Me, I've moved on to bamboo sheets and can't go back.
They're softer and breathe much better.

I don't have knowledgeable sources - I have two bed sheet sets in my house: one 500 thread and one 1000 - guess which one feels more durable and will take more abuse?



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