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Found this at my local Advance Auto Parts store. Front brakes for my Toyota Tundra was $47.99 - $15.00 rebate = $32.99. Dealership wanted $150 for pads and installation.

Looks like you can get a $30 rebate if you do front and rear or a $50 rebate if you have someone else do the front and rear.

Rebate Site

ThermoQuiet: The Best...For Less Program Rules

Rebate offer valid on qualifying Wagner® ThermoQuiet® or Wagner EDGE™ brake pads/shoes set product purchase. Wagner® SevereDuty™/QuickStop™ product does not qualify.
Auto Parts Store Purchase: Maximum product rebate is $30. $15 front set or $15 rear set.
Auto Service Facility Purchase/Installation:Maximum product rebate is $30 ($15 front set or $15 rear set) and maximum professional labor installation rebate is $20 ($10 front set or $10 rear set.
Offer valid 3/1/09 through 4/30/09.
Rebate Redemption Certificate (obtained at www.tqbestforless.com) and copy of original invoice indicating qualifying Wagner ThermoQuiet or Wagner EDGE brake pads/shoes purchase circled must be received by 5/29/09 for processing to address indicated on Rebate Redemption Certificate.
Only one rebate check per household address, except two in Rhode Island.
Offer valid in the United States and Canada only. Excludes Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands and other U.S. territories. Requests without zip code can not be processed.
Allow approximately 10 weeks for delivery of rebate check following the receipt of all required documentation at Program Headquarters.
Offer valid only to individual consumers; requests from groups, clubs or organizations will not be honored. Invalid or duplicate requests will not be honored or returned.
Offer cannot be combined with any other offer, coupon or discount card.
No incomplete, damaged, photocopied, mechanically reproduced, altered, or forged receipts or offer forms of any kind or receipts or offer forms not obtained through authorized channels will be accepted.
Return of any request/check as undeliverable will result in forfeiture of the rebate.
Federal-Mogul, Marketing Directions, Inc., and their respective parents, affiliates and subsidiaries (collectively, "Releasees") are not responsible for late, lost, illegible, damaged, incomplete, misaddressed, misdirected, inaccurate or postage-due mail, receipts, offer forms or rebate checks or for any errors of any kind relating to this offer.
All rebates become property of Federal-Mogul and are non-returnable. Federal-Mogul is committed to ensuring that all information gathered is kept confidential. Information collected is for internal purposes only.
Federal-Mogul has no obligation to acknowledge, redeem or return redemption requests not in compliance with these terms.
The U.S. Postal Statutes prohibit acts devised to defraud or to obtain money or property by false or fraudulent means, if the postal system is involved. This would include, among other things, the use of fictitious names or addresses.

Member Summary
Most Recent Posts
Pads are easy, just compress the calipers with a c clamp and throw the new ones in. There are plenty of instructions on... (more)

glenatuf (Apr. 23, 2009 @ 1:22p) |

These are good, quiet pads. Nice one-piece design. I would have bought these again but Monroe brakes have a similar re... (more)

quickfingerz (Apr. 23, 2009 @ 3:29p) |

The biggest problem you will have with torque on your tires, is tire shops ALWAYS overtighten the nuts. They are either... (more)

knickdigger (Apr. 23, 2009 @ 6:04p) |

Quick Summary is created and edited by users like you... Add FAQ's, Links and other Relevant Information by clicking the edit button in the lower right hand corner of this message.
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These are really good pads, I installed them on my Z3 and they perform better than OEM stuff I had on before... and are naturally very quiet.

wow, aftermarket pads with good reviews? I haven't run into that much myself. I might grab some for my golf.

thx op.

glenatuf said: wow, aftermarket pads with good reviews? I haven't run into that much myself. I might grab some for my golf.

thx op.



It's not as strange as you seem to think. Of course, it depends on how you drive. OEM pads are typically a compromise between life, stopping power, noise, fade, etc. You may not agree with their priorities.

So how difficult is to change pads. I looked at YouTube videos and it didnt seem that bad. My immediate thought was to get hold of a breaker bar to remove tires. Is that a big deal because of the torque rating requirements etc.?

Brake pads changed at my local chain-store mechanic lasts me about a year.
These Wagner's last me three years.
Great pads!

~M

I have these on my Integra and they do a decent job but they stop longer than the Honda pads.

Let the professionals (a reputable repair shop) do the brakes replacement, not worth the risk. Most DIY'ers probably get it done mostly right but I have seen too many miss or skip important steps like greasing the caliper pins/boots, bleed the brake lines or bleed incorrectly, torque bolts to spec, etc. The service manual definitely helps but it can't replace good experience.

ComeOnNow said: So how difficult is to change pads. I looked at YouTube videos and it didnt seem that bad. My immediate thought was to get hold of a breaker bar to remove tires. Is that a big deal because of the torque rating requirements etc.?

It depends on how high your jackstands will hold your car. Getting adequate leverage inside of the wheel well can be tough. It really shouldn't be more than a "4" or "5" (on a scale where 1=Adding oil, 2= Changing Wipers, 3= Changing Oil ... 10= Hand Carving a Supercharger Housing for your 2CV) kind of job ...

Might wanna check out rockauto or Amazon... pretty cheap prices. Raybestos & Monroe also have rebates going... Monroe's were cheaper for my car, and are just as good (for my car). On the otherhand, the Dealer brakes do last pretty long, (akebono's).

Yeah, just changing the pads is not that hard but doing all the little things to ensure that they don't squeak, seize, pins freeze etc is not that easy. If not done right, you might even face caliper replacement if you forget to inspect pin grommets and replace/grease them.

You will also need service manual (for torque values) and at the very minimum two torque wrenches (small and large) to do it right... Plus, depending on car brand, a set of nice hex sockets, breaker bar (I use a piece of old 2" PVC pipe as extender for my heavy duty 1/2" ratchet) and necessary standard sockets. I would also recommend a can of "Brake Quiet" to pain/spray all the surfaces (except for pad rotor contact surface naturally) to prevent any possibility of squeaking.

so... it is a DIY job but requires you to really know what you're doing.

Pads are easy, rotors, on the other hand, can be a royal pain if they have seized and you don't have a puller.

I use to be an autotech and these are good pads. They offer a good middle ground over low performnace and no dust and high performnace and lots of dust.

Ever since I started following this procedure my brake pads have performed much better:

Brake Bedding

It's not very difficult, buy everything you need including tools, jack stands and a good jack. You may not save much money the first time, but every time after you can just pick up pads and rotors and will save alot of $$.

There are plenty of instructions on the web for this, usually you can even find one for your car with pictures. Also if you have a friend that likes to work on cars ask them if they could help you as you don't want to take it to the stealership.

ComeOnNow said: So how difficult is to change pads. I looked at YouTube videos and it didnt seem that bad. My immediate thought was to get hold of a breaker bar to remove tires. Is that a big deal because of the torque rating requirements etc.?

I have two cars which require only front pads replacement, you think I will get $30 rebate for 2 seperate vehicle?

troyz said: It's not very difficult, buy everything you need including tools, jack stands and a good jack. You may not save much money the first time, but every time after you can just pick up pads and rotors and will save alot of $$.

There are plenty of instructions on the web for this, usually you can even find one for your car with pictures. Also if you have a friend that likes to work on cars ask them if they could help you as you don't want to take it to the stealership.

ComeOnNow said: So how difficult is to change pads. I looked at YouTube videos and it didnt seem that bad. My immediate thought was to get hold of a breaker bar to remove tires. Is that a big deal because of the torque rating requirements etc.?


I do change oil myself and have jack stand etc. I also have all the sockets/tools etc. My only concern was from safety point of view. Pep boys gave me an estimate of $500 for all brakes. I am sure I can beat it. I just want to make sure I dont screw it up.

On the flip side, brakes are needed for me every 6+ years, so over time its not such a big deal.

Thanks OP, I bought these Sunday with no mention of a rebate. Filled out out the form after seeing this post and await the rebate.
I'm also doing the rotors after being told $350 for front only brake job. My investment after rebate, $65.

Not sure if you can use a general rule for brake bedding, because I used many different brand of brake, and every one has different rule on bedding their brake pad.

troyz said: Ever since I started following this procedure my brake pads have performed much better:

Brake Bedding


troyz said: Ever since I started following this procedure my brake pads have performed much better:

Brake Bedding


Thanks troyz going to give this a try!

FWIW, I put a semi-metallic set of these on my car a year or so ago (along with new rotors) and they do squeak every great once in a while. I replaced according to the directions which specify NOT to use any type of shims, sprays, or treatments of any type. I would still purchase them again.

ComeOnNow said: troyz said: It's not very difficult, buy everything you need including tools, jack stands and a good jack. You may not save much money the first time, but every time after you can just pick up pads and rotors and will save alot of $$.

There are plenty of instructions on the web for this, usually you can even find one for your car with pictures. Also if you have a friend that likes to work on cars ask them if they could help you as you don't want to take it to the stealership.

ComeOnNow said: So how difficult is to change pads. I looked at YouTube videos and it didnt seem that bad. My immediate thought was to get hold of a breaker bar to remove tires. Is that a big deal because of the torque rating requirements etc.?


I do change oil myself and have jack stand etc. I also have all the sockets/tools etc. My only concern was from safety point of view. Pep boys gave me an estimate of $500 for all brakes. I am sure I can beat it. I just want to make sure I dont screw it up.

On the flip side, brakes are needed for me every 6+ years, so over time its not such a big deal.


Brakes are intentionally designed to be simple. Fewer moving parts = greater reliability.

Consequently, replacing pads is one of the easiest jobs on a car.

As noted above, it's smart to have someone who's done it before show you how. Watch while he does one wheel, then you do the other. Usually, it only takes a few tools -- I'd show up with a C-clamp, Allen wrenches, and metric sockets.

thinksnow said: Pads are easy, rotors, on the other hand, can be a royal pain if they have seized and you don't have a puller.

Pads are easy, just compress the calipers with a c clamp and throw the new ones in. There are plenty of instructions online and in the Haynes and chiltons manuals at auto parts places...they've got pictures step by step.

Rotors usually have a removal screw on them, where you can put a M8 (approx) sized bolt in there and turn it down till it pushes the rotor off. Easy peasy.

That being said, I'd suggest against having your rotors "turned" (machined) at a auto parts place or any place you don't trust. I've had several experiences, notably with ford sedans, where the guys don't line them up perfectly and then they machine them a bit off center. The disks end up wobbling as they stop and it causes a loud clacking noise and the rotors have to be replaced.

My suggestion is just don't machine them unless you have to (i.e. worn rings on the disk), and don't let your brakes go long enough where they need machining.

-g

These are good, quiet pads. Nice one-piece design. I would have bought these again but Monroe brakes have a similar rebate and are $7 cheaper. They also seem to be well designed.

ComeOnNow said: So how difficult is to change pads. I looked at YouTube videos and it didnt seem that bad. My immediate thought was to get hold of a breaker bar to remove tires. Is that a big deal because of the torque rating requirements etc.?
The biggest problem you will have with torque on your tires, is tire shops ALWAYS overtighten the nuts. They are either: stupid, uncaring, unaware of torque (because they use an air wrench), or they have a sinister plot to keep people from DIY'ing because they wont be able to remove the nuts without a breaker bar, a 4 foot cheater pipe, and a fat chick on a diving board.

You do need to pay attention to re-torqing the bolts on the brake caliper when you reinstall it.



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