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Sous Vide
First developed in France, sous vide (pronounced soo veed) is a culinary technique long respected by gourmet chefs for its reliability and improved food quality. It's an easy, safe and virtually foolproof way to prepare delicious, healthful and perfectly-prepared meals.

Take it Home
It's the biggest thing to happen to home kitchens since the microwave! The SousVide Supreme™ is the world's first water oven designed specifically for use in the home kitchen. Developed by Eades Appliance Technology LLC, the SousVide Supreme finally provides the everyday cook with easy access to the beneficial culinary style of sous vide.

Pre-Orders being October 23, 2009 with a $50 off retail price of $399.00

Bon Appétit

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You're joking right? The term immersion circulator refers to two things: the immersion and circulation of a heating elem... (more)

sygyzy (Nov. 02, 2009 @ 12:39p) |

This thread is still cooking?

ninjaman (Nov. 02, 2009 @ 12:45p) |

I love mine! I'm actually sorta wishing I had bought two, so I could be cooking multiple items at once

AJolly (Dec. 05, 2009 @ 6:39a) |

Quick Summary is created and edited by users like you... Add FAQ's, Links and other Relevant Information by clicking the edit button in the lower right hand corner of this message.
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Interesting.
They really should pick some better photos of the food they made in this thing - not very appetizing looking to me!

Why not just use a crockpot?

This is nicer than a crockpot because you can cook it to the exact temperature throughout and you cannot overcook anything, no matter how long you leave it in the water. So, say you are cooking steaks for friends, you can cook them to the exact temperature(to the exact degree..say 135 degrees)and when you are ready pull them out and grill/pan fry lightly on either side and you are good to go. You can also have multiple steaks all ready and cooked just waiting in the machine(for long periods of time...they will not overcook) for final grilling. You cannot overcook using this(except maybe shellfish, squid and other things that are time sensitive rather than ultimate temperature sensitive). You will not end up with raw center and overcooked exterior...ever, unless that is what you want.

Crank said: Interesting.
They really should pick some better photos of the food they made in this thing - not very appetizing looking to me!



The flavors are really intense with sous vide.

garlic herb chicken
1/4 clove
pinch of salt
pinch of herbs
tab of real butter
seal, submerge and come back in 2hrs for the most flavorful and juiciest chicken you've ever had.

Mmmmmm...botulism....

Just kidding, I hope.

Waste of $400 if you ask me. By the way - the description reads almost exactly like a crock pot glossy. Yes, the temperature control may be tighter. Maybe. I'll wait for Cooks Illustrated to buy one and see if they think it's useful for all but a select few dishes. Since I have yet to see the equivalent in a restaurant kitchen (and I work in architecture, so I see quite a few commercial kitchens) - what is the "trade" name for this normally? Maybe I've missed it.

Practical Guide to Sous Vide Cooking - Applied Mathematics (University of Colorado at Boulder)

Bon Appetite's 12 Best Cookbooks of 2008

New York Times Sous Vide Article

Cooking at Pembroke - Cambridge

Epicurious Article on Cookbook

Overzeetop said: Waste of $400 if you ask me. By the way - the description reads almost exactly like a crock pot glossy. Yes, the temperature control may be tighter. Maybe. I'll wait for Cooks Illustrated to buy one and see if they think it's useful for all but a select few dishes. Since I have yet to see the equivalent in a restaurant kitchen (and I work in architecture, so I see quite a few commercial kitchens) - what is the "trade" name for this normally? Maybe I've missed it.

Next time you're in a commerical kitchen, ask the chef about sous vide. Just because you've never heard of sous vide, doesn't make it viable. I'm sure there are tons of cooking terms and cooking methods you've never heard of or seen first hand.

Think of this device like the microwave of the 60's. It was new, never heard of and now can you really imagine a kitchen without one?

Yeah, a crockpot with a digital temperature control instead of high, low and warm would work. Or mod the controls of a slow cooker. My Hamilton Beach 33967 6-Quart slow cooker even has a temp probe...Prob could be mdded somehow.

Thanks for posting, and for the later reference links. I had nver heared of this method...and your references indicate that if it is a sham, it is fooling a lot of smart people.

Of course, when it comes to our senses, a lot of people can be fooled...which is why Monster cable can sell a $250 HDMI cable, and perhaps why I just bought a $30 "instant wine decanter/aireator" thingy from Woot wine.

The $50 discount won't persuade too many folks to buy now...but worth watching.

Cooks have been using thermal immersion circulators to sous vide in a water bath for a while now. Check out the kitchens on Top Chef or Iron Chef...they're using them with steam trays.

Crock pots with digital temperature controls aren't designed to cook at the low temperatures required, nor can they maintain perfect water temperature without circulation.

Thomas Keller released Under Pressure earlier this year, which covers sous vide cooking.

Check out eBay for an immersion circulator and go to your nearest Restaurant supply store to get a steam tray. You can put one together a kit for less than $150, if you're lucky on eBay.

BTW, nice and shiny piece of equipment.

How much energy (power consumption) does it take to run this bad boy?

Is it energy efficient?

There are lots of videos on YouTube - search "Sous Vide"

This is the Dyson of crockpots!

ajny said: This is the Dyson of crockpots!

Do you mean simply expensive?

or overpriced, considering the value/performance (Consumer Reports rated the Dyson quite low)?

Thomas Keller demoing sous vide style cooking YouTube.

swilson191 said:

Think of this device like the microwave of the 60's. It was new, never heard of and now can you really imagine a kitchen without one?


Eh... As interesting as it is, I'm not really buying the analogy. The big selling point of a microwave is that it's fast, easy, space-saving, and an overall convenience that anyone can use. This isn't any of those particularly. While it may give great results for particular recipies, it's not the kind of thing that I think you'll ever see in every kitchen. A better comparison might be with something like a smoker in that it works great for what it does, but not really a general purpose appliance.

I have been using a large "dumb" rice cooker with a PID with good results. The problem is volume. I can't fit more than three NY strips in there. I am expecting delivery of a Haake immersion circulator tomorrow. Now that'll be fun. I think this product looks pretty amazing. It's basically a crock pot with a PID, very similar to my setup. This is a niche product. Unless you are really into scientific cooking, this will be meaningless to you.

This is a "boil in the bag" water heater...

Fast food services have been using these systems for years.

A $400 water heater. Well, I think.. err.. know the mainstream food service appliances are much, much, MUCH better engineered and work better.

This would be completely worthless unless the food packages are perfectly prepared.

Food service scientists make their living trying to figure out how to make the bags of chicken, beef, rice, etc. taste perfect using this method.

Just want to give a heads up for people so they know what they are getting into.. (Like RONCO products... )

Yeah a PID device was what I was trying to think of. I've seen a video of a guy modding an espresso machine with one to make the water the exact temp he wanted it to be.

festisio said: This is a "boil in the bag" water heater...

Fast food services have been using these systems for years.

A $400 water heater. Well, I think.. err.. know the mainstream food service appliances are much, much, MUCH better engineered and work better.

This would be completely worthless unless the food packages are perfectly prepared.

Food service scientists make their living trying to figure out how to make the bags of chicken, beef, rice, etc. taste perfect using this method.

Just want to give a heads up for people so they know what they are getting into.. (Like RONCO products... )


Do you know what you are talking about or are you just trying to come off as an expert in something you know nothing about? Serious question.

ninjaman said: Yeah a PID device was what I was trying to think of. I've seen a video of a guy modding an espresso machine with one to make the water the exact temp he wanted it to be.

Yes, PID in the Silvia is a common mod. Same idea.

It's good tech, but like any tech, if it's worthwhile:

1) There will be improvements to the technology after mass public "beta testing" by early adopters.

2) It eventually goes mainstream, and prices will drop considerably.

It's a great idea, it's a little too pricey for me to consider jumping as yet. Better to invest in a decent induction cook top for the time being as it's probably something you'd use more on a day-to-day basis.

sygyzy said: festisio said: This is a "boil in the bag" water heater...

Fast food services have been using these systems for years.

A $400 water heater. Well, I think.. err.. know the mainstream food service appliances are much, much, MUCH better engineered and work better.

This would be completely worthless unless the food packages are perfectly prepared.

Food service scientists make their living trying to figure out how to make the bags of chicken, beef, rice, etc. taste perfect using this method.

Just want to give a heads up for people so they know what they are getting into.. (Like RONCO products... )


Do you know what you are talking about or are you just trying to come off as an expert in something you know nothing about? Serious question.
According to Wikipedia, he might be close with his description: sous videsous-vide cooking uses airtight plastic bags placed in hot water well below boiling point (usually around 60°C or 140°F) And IIRC, that's how that Top Chef Hung cooked a number of his dishes: food "boiled" in a bag.

swilson191 said:
Just because you've never heard of sous vide, doesn't make it viable. I'm sure there are tons of cooking terms and cooking methods you've never heard of or seen first hand.




Friggin fancy crockpot snob

I'm all for the cooking method but I think this machine is over priced. I'd wait for this to be on the market for a while and/or for competitors to create competing models. I think that the price will come down significantly.

Thomas Keller, one of the best chef in America does the vast majority of his food Sous Vide and has a book called Under Pressure that is all about sous vide cooking. It might not be the cooking method of the future but it will be up there. People comparing it to crock pot cooking are kinda right, only if if the crock pot could maintain exact temperatures. For Sous Vide cooking that is most important, for both the quantity of food as well as the health aspects the of food. If this products works it will be exciting.

72 hours to cook tender meat. So I have to know on Wednesday night that I want a steak on Saturday.

Sorry, but that doesn't fly with me. I don't mind trying new things but that seems ridiculous.

"up to 72 hours to tenderize tougher meats"

sygyzy said: festisio said: This is a "boil in the bag" water heater...

Fast food services have been using these systems for years.

A $400 water heater. Well, I think.. err.. know the mainstream food service appliances are much, much, MUCH better engineered and work better.

This would be completely worthless unless the food packages are perfectly prepared.

Food service scientists make their living trying to figure out how to make the bags of chicken, beef, rice, etc. taste perfect using this method.

Just want to give a heads up for people so they know what they are getting into.. (Like RONCO products... )


Do you know what you are talking about or are you just trying to come off as an expert in something you know nothing about? Serious question.


Yes, I know exactly what i'm talking about.

Food scientists at my company have pretty much perfected the technique.

This method of cooking was intended to control quality, by centralizing the preparation of food at a commissary and having the end-users simply heat the product and use it. It takes the "kitchen" work out of food prep..

You see, fast food is the first to benefit from this method of preparation..

Do a bit of research and you will find that this boil-in-the-bag method was designed for businesses to save money and improve quality and consistency of their product among franchises. (Through the use of a central commissary).

Doing this for personal use, just seems absurd...

Hotels, airlines, restaurant chains, etc that need to have consistent quality, taste, flavor, benefit from this.

festisio said: Fast food services have been using these systems for years.......This method of cooking was intended to control quality, by centralizing the preparation of food at a commissary and having the end-users simply heat the product and use it. It takes the "kitchen" work out of food prep.....Doing this for personal use, just seems absurd....
This makes sense, and also fits with why it has not caught on for home use.

Its in some ways analogous to those Vaccuum Meat Marinators For years they have tried to sell them for home use as instant flavor marinators...with almost no proof that it works.....cook's illustrated tested them and says they don't.

The food industry DOES use vaccum tumblers....but it is for quickly and consistantly bathing produce and meats in natural preservatives (like citric acid) so they have a longer shelf life in restaurants. Selling them to home cooks as flavor enhancers is just a marketing thing with no science.

"Amtrak has used this method of cooking in the dining cars of its long-distance trains, and recently began using the method on its Acela Express trains."

Amtrak food at home? No, thank you.

festisio said: This is a "boil in the bag" water heater...

Fast food services have been using these systems for years.

A $400 water heater. Well, I think.. err.. know the mainstream food service appliances are much, much, MUCH better engineered and work better.

This would be completely worthless unless the food packages are perfectly prepared.

Food service scientists make their living trying to figure out how to make the bags of chicken, beef, rice, etc. taste perfect using this method.

Just want to give a heads up for people so they know what they are getting into.. (Like RONCO products... )


There is so much wrong with what you just said.

Sure, it is sort of a $400 water heater... and they are similar setups in most restaurants (so are ovens, pots, pans, etc, come on).. but this thing is accurate to within .1 degree, extremely stable.

this is nothing like a ronco product. and as for the bags being perfectly prepared, its really not that hard. its much easier than other types of cooking.

Microwaves engendered the expression "nuke it." I hope these catch on so we can say "bong it!"

Disclaimer: Water Ovens are for tobacco use only.

I can't believe the amount of misinformation in this thread. Clearly this is not for everyone.

Please correct me...since I must be wrong at some thing.
...just wondering...I thought highest temp for water is at 100degree C....
and some virus/bacteria in meat, is best to be cooked at that heat to be safe....
So does this go over 100 degree?...if not then its kinda unsafe to use to cook pork or certain meat under that temp isn't it?
now, can I just seal my food in a zip loc and steam it...it'll be close right...and flavor are sealed...and high temp achieved....?

Walay said: Please correct me if wrong...
...just wondering...I thought highest temp for water is at 100degree C....
and some virus/bacteria in meat, is best to be cooked at that heat to be safe....
So does this go over 100 degree?...if not then its kinda unsafe to use isn't it?
now, can I just seal my food in a zip loc and steam it...it'll be close right...and flavor are sealed...and high temp achieved....?


poultry should be cooked to 165F for at least 15 seconds, meats and pork to 145 for at least 15 seconds, ground meat/sausages to 155 (15 seconds), but large roasts only to 130 for at least two hours.

this cooking process allows you to reach those temps slowly, bringing the entire dish/piece of food up to that temperature, but never going above it. it means the proteins set in a better way and you don't have to worry about dried out, overdone food.

"Clostridium botulinum bacteria can grow in food in the absence of oxygen and produce the deadly botulinum toxin, so sous-vide cooking must be performed under carefully controlled conditions to avoid botulism poisoning.[3] To help with food safety and taste, relatively expensive water-bath machines (thermal immersion circulators) are used to circulate precisely heated water. Differences of even one degree can affect the finished product."

hack this machine to produce your own botox!

Overzeetop said: Waste of $400 if you ask me. By the way - the description reads almost exactly like a crock pot glossy. Yes, the temperature control may be tighter. Maybe. I'll wait for Cooks Illustrated to buy one and see if they think it's useful for all but a select few dishes. Since I have yet to see the equivalent in a restaurant kitchen (and I work in architecture, so I see quite a few commercial kitchens) - what is the "trade" name for this normally? Maybe I've missed it.

Your personal pronoun/sentence ratio is almost 1:1 here. I always use that to rate a persons open mindedness/intelligence. Is it possible that there is more to this "crock pot" than YOU understand?


edit: ration to ratio

festisio said: Doing this for personal use, just seems absurd...

Probably because you're ignoring other potential benefits for home users.

Skipping 18 Messages...
I love mine! I'm actually sorta wishing I had bought two, so I could be cooking multiple items at once



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