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The buzzing is driving me crazy.

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HorB said: The buzzing is driving me crazy.

Yeah, I wouldn't, for a few reasons.

What are the reasons?

Well, your fridge will heat up overnight and it'll have to strain to cool down tomorrow, driving your electric bill crazy. Plus, it's just hard on the compressor, having to do that much work that often. If it's unusually loud then it just may be a dirty coil.

PS> Doing that as a practice will also lead to early food spoilage.

Ok, thanks. It's a brand new Whirlpool I got two weeks ago. It has buzzed from the beginning.

HorB said: Ok, thanks. It's a brand new Whirlpool I got two weeks ago. It has buzzed from the beginning.

Hmmm, if it's loud then it may just be a fan rubbing or something, a new compressor should be quiet.

It is really loud. Maybe I should call Best Buy. Do the geeks do refrigerators?

HorB said: It is really loud. Maybe I should call Best Buy. Do the geeks do refrigerators?

Geeks do whatever will let them.



(sorry... couldn't resist... back to those who can help you )

HorB said: It is really loud. Maybe I should call Best Buy. Do the geeks do refrigerators?

I don't know, but it does sound like something's wrong. Could just be a fan rubbing (common) or just a bad unit. If it's the top freezer kind, then you might try prodding the shroud in the back of the freezer a bit and see it the noise changes.

I'll try that. Thanks for the suggestions.

formattc said: Well, your fridge will heat up overnight and it'll have to strain to cool down tomorrow, driving your electric bill crazy. Plus, it's just hard on the compressor, having to do that much work that often. If it's unusually loud then it just may be a dirty coil.

PS> Doing that as a practice will also lead to early food spoilage.
I kinda disagree with Matt on the temp issue.

I think the increase in temp would be minimal. But the proof is in the pudding, as they say, and we need not guess here. Most people have those refrigerator thermometers. One can check the temp before going to bed and turning off the frig and then check it again in the morning. If it is less than 5 degF, I would think no big deal. My guess is that it would be about 3 degF. But what is definitely correct (and assuming a night means 8 hours) then the refrigerator would work 50% harder. That is, if the compressor would normally work 15 min every hours, now it would first work between 2 hours non-stop when you first turn it on in the morning before it would go to its normal 15 min per hour routine.

Depending on the pitch of the noise, the noise might not be from the compressor but from a loose part or coil/evaporator. I do not necessarily recommend this to others but *I* would often give the appliance a stern whack near where the noise comes from to see if the noise would go away as a result of repositioning of (loose) parts.

I've already tried the whack, but I don't think I reached the level of stern. It was more of a warning shot. I think I will call in a professional tomorrow.

When I gave my long answer I had not noticed that this is a brand new frig (I think I am ADD). Calling a professional is the best action. I might even ask BB to pick up that one and deliver you another one.

If the professional recommends repair (other than adjusting a screw/nut), again, I would decline and ask for another one.

BTW: let me add that, ironically, and perhaps even counter-intuitively, the more stuff you have in your refrigerator, the less temperature rise it would experience as a result of turning it off over might.

I would take that puppy back.

0AfterRebates said: I would take that puppy back.yeah, a brand new unit shouldn't be so loud that you would consider unplugging it a night. compressor problems from the factory are not unheard of.

"Will it hurt to unplug my refrigerator at night?" If you unplug it incorrectly, it may hurt a LOT

Do you sleep in the same room with your fridge? I used to unplug mine at night and never had a prob...until I forgot to plug it in the next morning. Now I have a timer.

As for the energy usage, it should slightly decrease, because as the inside warms, there is a period of time with less heat gain from the room to the fridge. Then that savings is multiplied by ~ 1.5 if you're using A/C, because every bit of heat removed from the fridge goes into the room. Really idiotic overall design. Besides putting the coils outside in the shade, they might also consider putting the heat-generating compressor on top instead of in the back under the bottom where the heat can't escape. Sheese..

Do a search for your model of fridge and see if others complain of this.
My mom bought a new freezer and the buzzing it made bothered her. She went online to Lowe's and all the comments were the same about the loud buzzing; the store, when called, said that it had to do with the high energy saving motors that are now used.

My parents had Lowe's take it back and then went to Sears and bought a Kenmore.

HorB said: The buzzing is driving me crazy.
Let the vuvuzela player out of the fridge.

Fix what's loose and causing the buzzing.


you call fer repairz?
Disclaimer
hmm.

It won't hurt if you're gentle about it.

Your food would spoil. 4-6 hours is when they have to throw food out at the store if they don't have a backup generator.

Keep in mind that any energy saved by turning it off at night is lost because you are making it work twice as hard in the morning when the electricity is much more expensive than at night when it's cheap. I also just wouldn't ever want to put my own health at risk due to food contamination/spoilage issues just to save a few bucks. I'm worth more than that. Besides, overworking your compressor means it will last a short period of time before failure, and you'll spend a whole lot more than you ever saved repairing or replacing the fridge.

Wineaux said: Keep in mind that any energy saved by turning it off at night is lost because you are making it work twice as hard in the morning when the electricity is much more expensive than at night when it's cheap. ...In which city/market area is electricity cheaper at night than in the morning for residential areas?

katx said: Wineaux said: Keep in mind that any energy saved by turning it off at night is lost because you are making it work twice as hard in the morning when the electricity is much more expensive than at night when it's cheap. ...In which city/market area is electricity cheaper at night than in the morning for residential areas?
Everywhere. Why else do you think they recommend that you do laundry at night when the electricity is cheaper? Your washer and dryer are some of the worse energy hogs in your home. During business hours, electricity is at its highest. Late at night when there is less demand, it is at its lowest.

I'd guess that summer (higher night time temps) versus winter would make a difference on the effect that turning it off at night would have.

Since it's new, it's under warrantee. Call a repair person.

Wineaux said: katx said: Wineaux said: Keep in mind that any energy saved by turning it off at night is lost because you are making it work twice as hard in the morning when the electricity is much more expensive than at night when it's cheap. ...In which city/market area is electricity cheaper at night than in the morning for residential areas?
Everywhere. Why else do you think they recommend that you do laundry at night when the electricity is cheaper? Your washer and dryer are some of the worse energy hogs in your home. During business hours, electricity is at its highest. Late at night when there is less demand, it is at its lowest.
Here are the rates for residential areas in Los Angeles: rates.

As you can see, unless you CHOOSE to have a "Time-of-Use Meter", electricity has a uniform rate.

I chose Los Angeles as it would have been one of the likelier places have a variable rate. I bet there are thousands of areas with no differentiated rates.

At any rate, how would a simple, ordinary electricity meter know which kilowatt was used in the morning and which at night?

BTW: have you guys heard the claim that says empty refrigerators are more expensive to run? Do you believe it?

Of course. The food itself holds the cold, and of course there is less empty air in the refrigerator to keep cool.

katx said: BTW: have you guys heard the claim that says empty refrigerators are more expensive to run? Do you believe it?

Yes, and yes.

joyrae said: katx said: BTW: have you guys heard the claim that says empty refrigerators are more expensive to run? Do you believe it?

Yes, and yes.


I was being obnoxious... (as is expected)... but here is an explanation that makes sense to me:

"Every time you open the door to the refrigerator, you let out cold air and let in warm air--and when you shut the door, all that warm air you let in has to be cooled down. The more air space in the fridge, the more cold air that can be swapped with warm air from the kitchen. More warm air = more cooling required = higher fridge juice consumption = lighter wallet. "

Full fridge => less air space inside fridge => less space for air displacement (warm swapping with cool) => less warm air to cool every time door is opened and closed => less energy consumption


(but, I reserve the right to be completely wrong)

Wineaux said: Of course. The food itself holds the cold, and of course there is less empty air in the refrigerator to keep cool.this does no follow -- at least not the way you have said it. clearly it takes more energy to cool food than to cool air.

joyrae said: joyrae said: katx said: BTW: have you guys heard the claim that says empty refrigerators are more expensive to run? Do you believe it?

Yes, and yes.


I was being obnoxious... (as is expected)... but here is an explanation that makes sense to me:

"Every time you open the door to the refrigerator, you let out cold air and let in warm air--and when you shut the door, all that warm air you let in has to be cooled down. The more air space in the fridge, the more cold air that can be swapped with warm air from the kitchen. More warm air = more cooling required = higher fridge juice consumption = lighter wallet. "

Full fridge => less air space inside fridge => less space for air displacement (warm swapping with cool) => less warm air to cool every time door is opened and closed => less energy consumption


(but, I reserve the right to be completely wrong)
This explanation is right on the dot. and it explains 90% of it. there is another factor in play. here is a kinda hint: the original claim/statement is true even if you never open the frig's door.

katx said: ]This explanation is right on the dot. and it explains 90% of it. here is a kinda hint: that statement is true even if you never open the frig's door.

Do I w|n a prize??

A new fridge shouldn't be so noisy that you need to consider turning it off at night or putting it in the backyard. Call Best Buy for an exchange or repair. If it's still noisy, trade it in for another model.

Fridge's arent cheap, yes you should call Best Buys A.S.A.P.

joyrae said: katx said: ]This explanation is right on the dot. and it explains 90% of it. here is a kinda hint: that statement is true even if you never open the frig's door.

Do I w|n a prize??
But of course. You won one of my prized greens.


our fridge buzzes ...,not from internal components, but due to the wheels vibrating on the floor...pushing down slightly on the fridge will stop the buzz

See if the wheels or mounting surface can be deadened if thats whats buzzing

katx said:
I think the increase in temp would be minimal. But the proof is in the pudding, as they say, and we need not guess here.


Clearly, the answer is to check the temperature of the pudding.

Skipping 5 Messages...
joyrae said: ...Full fridge => less air space inside fridge => less space for air displacement (warm swapping with cool) => less warm air to cool every time door is opened and closed => less energy consumptionExactly
In the off-grid homes I've visited, (where energy is expensive), they have rectangular air bags for the empty shelves and door pockets. If you take something out which won't be returned, then put in a bag at that moment.



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