NYC Traffic Ticket - 1163A

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Hi,

I received a ticket yesterday for an improper turn. This would be my first moving violation. I tried researching this but some of the links say 1163A is the wrong violation code for an improper turn. I've only had 3 parking tickets prior to this (not sure how this impacts anything)

I did make an improper turn and as I did, the officer ended up right behind me in the street I turned in to.

My questions are: how much does this affect my insurance? Is this something that can be easily contested?

Anyone have any experience with this in NYC? From what I read, this would be a 3 point violation. What does that translate to on a monthly increase in my insurance?

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Article 28 section 1163 of the New York vehicle code is the correct violation. Section (a) deals with generally unsafe (you pulled out in front of somebody) and unsignaled turns. So that part seems right:
http://law.onecle.com/new-york/vehicle-traffic/VAT01163_1163.html

As far as your insurance goes... in most places you can attend a driving class or get court supervision and it won't go on your driving record.

Plead innocent, show up in court, DA agrees to lesser charge as long as you don't go to trial. Maybe 2 points instead of three. You could always go to trial and hope cop doesn't show up.

bobbybore said:   Plead innocent, show up in court, DA agrees to lesser charge as long as you don't go to trial. Maybe 2 points instead of three. You could always go to trial and hope cop doesn't show up.
The NYC TVB doesn't work that way. There's no da, theres no judge, theres no cop. Just you, taking it up where the sun doesn't shine.

scrouds said:   bobbybore said:   Plead innocent, show up in court, DA agrees to lesser charge as long as you don't go to trial. Maybe 2 points instead of three. You could always go to trial and hope cop doesn't show up.
The NYC TVB doesn't work that way. There's no da, theres no judge, theres no cop. Just you, taking it up where the sun doesn't shine.



The cop has to show up at the hearing. "The ALJ will listen to sworn testimony from the police officer, who will explain why you were given the ticket. Then, you or your attorney may ask the officer questions. You also may bring witnesses to testify for you and written evidence. The judge may ask witnesses questions to better understand their testimony." Text



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