too much iron in our well water?

Archived From: Off Topic
  • Page :
  • 1
  • Text Only
rated:
Just got this message from our builder:

The water has been tested twice by the water softener people. Both times it has shown levels of iron that are too high for a water softener to remove. The cost for a water softener is $1100. The cost for a combination iron filtration and water softener is $2260. The only problem with iron is cosmetic. The toilets will develop red stains. How do you want to proceed?

Discuss...

Thanks for visiting FatWallet.com. Join for free to remove this ad.
Can't you add the "Iron Out" into the water softener?

If not, I would pay the extra... in the long run it'll be better cause you won't have spots on dishes, spots in toilets, tubs and sinks, stuff in water, etc.

Plus, it'll keep iron buildup out of the softener, heater, and pipes...

Iron can be found in four different forms:

Ferrous Iron: It is often called "clear iron" and the iron particles are no visible in the water. The iron particle will rust once they interact with air. This form of iron can not be mechanical filtered from the water. It can be treated by ion exchange using a water softener or water conditioner or a Manganese Greensand Iron Filter. Certain water conditions need to exist. See product specification for details.

Ferric Iron: It is often called "red water iron" and the iron particles are visible in the water. The iron particles in this case rust when they are in contact with the water forming solid particles and therefore, they can be mechanical filtered. This form of iron can be treated with a Manganese Greensand Iron Filter or with a Backwash Birm Media Filter.

Bacterial Iron: It is often called "pink water iron" and it may not be visible in the water. However, you may see a reddish/green slime build up where water is kept for period of time like toilets and bathtub. As it name indicates, this form of iron are iron particles that have or have had life. This form of iron may need to be treated with chlorine before Manganese Greensand Iron Filter or Birm Media Backwash Filter is installed.

Colloidal Iron: Very small oxidized (colloidal size) iron particles are suspended in the water and they may be combined with organic matter which cause them to repel each other. This form of iron is visible in the water and it looks similar to the ferric Iron. Because the iron particles are very small and in suspension, this form of iron is not mechanical filterable. The water needs to be treated with chlorine first so the organic matter bound with the iron particles are eliminated and the iron particles left can floc together in order for conventional filtration to be applied.


ok, so what sort of iron do you have?

DutchDutch said: [Q]ok, so what sort of iron do you have?

don't know yet, awaiting reply from builder.
also asked for the concentration levels.

google is my friend <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-happy.gif" border=0>

I would ask for an independent test to make sure this is not just to increase thir sales.

Take it from one who knows......do whatever you can to get rid of the iron.

For the first 11 years of our marriage, my husband and I endured water from h3ll!

I could never, EVER buy anything white and things that only came in white (underwear, socks) were just horrible looking. My naturally blonde hair turned a lovely orangey color. It was HORRIBLE! After having it all stripped out once, I even tried washing my hair only with bottled water (ironically, i live in a town famous for it's water and you can get spring water free if you carry the containers and fill them yourself). That didn't last long because it was just too much trouble.

I could scrub the toilets clean and within 3 days they were orange and looked like I hadn't touched then in years. For my obsessive-compulsive-clean-freak self....well you can imagine. It was insane the amount of cleaning supplies I purchased. The inside of my dishwasher and my washing machine were ruined from orange stains. My dishes were even nasty looking because after a while the iron built up on them. The Iron Out people loved me because I'm sure I paid several salaries over the years. Don't even get me started on the bathtubs! ::shudder:: I've thrown away more shower curtain liners than I care to mention.....all totally orange.

We finally received city water in our area and even though our water bills are outrageous ($103 this past month) I gladly pay it and am probably still saving money in the long run because I'm no longer ruining clothes and spending all that money on cleaning supplies.

Whatever it costs...PAY IT!


I'm assuming that like me, you have a well. Over the years I've replaced the water softener twice (myself). I've never heard of water so hard that a water softener and/or filter couldn't handle it. So I wouldn't worry.

I installed the most recent softener about a year and a half ago. It was a Kenmore from S/ears--delivered price was ~$450. It does a very good job, even though except for the head it's mostly plastic.

I also put a whole house filter in the basement. It's one of those with the BIG filters. About $75 and does a very good job eliminating sediment and odor.

And to top it all off...the PUR filter at the kitchen faucet removes all remaining traces of odor and provides very good drinking water.

By the way, my water is pretty foul otherwise. It's safe enough, but without the equipment mentioned...I would not drink or wash with it.

Make sure they provide a written report with the test results. I'd have it tested myself if I were you.

Do you know how deep your well is?

Lots of water softener companies will give you misleading "results" to scare you into buying extra stuff.

Jstkiddn said: [Q]Take it from one who knows......do whatever you can to get rid of the iron.

For the first 11 years of our marriage, my husband and I endured water from h3ll!!I am totally with you....but there's nothing I can do about it.

The only thing that cleans my toilet and shower/tub is Snobol, and believe me, you do NOT want to get this stuff on your skin. I have to use an iron-removing shampoo. I do my laundry at my parents - and I'm 40 years old (I wash my hair there too at least once a week).

Unfortunately, the house is otherwise perfect for me, I know my LL can't afford to dig a new well and he has charged me bargain-basement rent for the last seven years.

But it so bites. Unless you have a good reason to go easy on your LL, do NOT put up with it.

cga said: [Q]I'm assuming that like me, you have a well. Over the years I've replaced the water softener twice (myself). I've never heard of water so hard that a water softener and/or filter couldn't handle it. So I wouldn't worry.

I installed the most recent softener about a year and a half ago. It was a Kenmore from S/ears--delivered price was ~$450. It does a very good job, even though except for the head it's mostly plastic.

I also put a whole house filter in the basement. It's one of those with the BIG filters. About $75 and does a very good job eliminating sediment and odor.

And to top it all off...the PUR filter at the kitchen faucet removes all remaining traces of odor and provides very good drinking water.

By the way, my water is pretty foul otherwise. It's safe enough, but without the equipment mentioned...I would not drink or wash with it.

Make sure they provide a written report with the test results. I'd have it tested myself if I were you.

Do you know how deep your well is?

What form of iron do you have? What kind of whole house filter did you install? How often do you have to change the media? TIA

>>>
What form of iron do you have? What kind of whole house filter did you install? How often do you have to change the media? TIA
>>>

Well, I'm embarrassed to admit I don't know what kind of iron we have. I suppose I must have known at one time, but have long since forgotten.

The whole house filter is a generic type available at Lowes or Home D/epot. There are basically only two types. One takes the small filter and the other uses large filters. Forget about the small ones.

The filter cartridge assembly itself should be less than $80 and must be soldered in place. Typically, it's situated near the main water inlet pipe--where it comes in from the outside, before and near the first (if you have more than one) strorage tank. The filters themselves vary in price, longevity and micron level. The lower the micron rating, the better the filtration, but at the expense of lifespan. This could also affect water pressure since the lower micron filters plug up faster. Filter prices are in the $15-35 range. I normally use 30-50 micron filters ($15-20) and replace them every 4-6 months.

This should be your first line of defense.

i'd get an independent test done as suggested.

too much iron in our well water?

well, if a refridgerator magnet will stick to a cup full of it, yeah, you may have too much iron.

would there be a way to remove the iron using (totally friggin' brilliant idea, I'm not sharing)? Oh, wait, if that works, I may want to get a patent....excuse me a minute.

It appears to be Ferrous Iron.

2.3 mg/L one day and 4 mg/l a week later.


I always thought I was a redhead until I moved away from the water with iron.<img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-blush.gif" border=0>

It may not be as bad a problem as originally thought. From the builder (who we trust)...

"You can have the well tested by 10 different labs at ten different days and
you will see 10 different results due to the number of veins that the water
is drawn thru underground. There are definitely days with high iron and
those with low. Your water has been independently tested by a state
certified lab at .54 mg/L after running the water for 4 days without
shutting it off. I faxed you the results. You are looking for exact
answers for a variable condition (well water)."

wordgirl said: [Q]Unless you have a good reason to go easy on your LL, do NOT put up with it.

I had to read your post twice before I realized LL was "landlord" and not "lesbian lover." <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-tongue.gif" border=0>

nomar05 said: [Q]Just got this message from our builder:

The water has been tested twice by the water softener people. Both times it has shown levels of iron that are too high for a water softener to remove. The cost for a water softener is $1100. The cost for a combination iron filtration and water softener is $2260. The only problem with iron is cosmetic. The toilets will develop red stains. How do you want to proceed?

Discuss... You're getting taken to the cleaners. Call around for other bids for water softeners and iron filtration. Sears' most expensive water softener is currently $949. Here's one from Sears that was $999 and is on sale for $729: Linko

Here's an iron filter at Sears for $929: Linko

Total combined cost: $729 + $929 = $1658. You can send me a check for the $600 I just saved you <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-happy.gif" border=0> Plus, don't forget to find Sears coupons and/or sales.



Disclaimer: By providing links to other sites, FatWallet.com does not guarantee, approve or endorse the information or products available at these sites, nor does a link indicate any association with or endorsement by the linked site to FatWallet.com.

Thanks for visiting FatWallet.com. Join for free to remove this ad.

TRUSTe online privacy certification

While FatWallet makes every effort to post correct information, offers are subject to change without notice.
Some exclusions may apply based upon merchant policies.
© 1999-2014