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Posted previously in rental/investment property thread, searched Fatwallet for this, but didn't find any info/reply:

I found a property that has been decreased to 40% off of market value because of a steep concrete driveway. I live in GA, so snow isn't a problem, but it looks like no one of the buyers who saw it before me is willing to reconstruct or redesign the driveway in a way that would allow easier access; most wouldn't even bother to climb up or try to drive up the steep hill. I guess, not only parking in the garage, but moving in is close to impossible.

Is anyone aware of an easy (or moderate-to-easy) way of rebuilding the driveway to allow 2WD vehicles access to the garage (currently only 4x4 can do that)?
What issues are related to a steep incline (obtaining insurance, safety, mail/package delivery)?

Please comment on the following possible driveway solutions (or any other you think could be relevant):
1)"mud jacking"
2)pouring additional layer of concrete
3)completely removing old driveway/building anew

Since this is a "no-disclosure sale", how could I get more info on the property's history/previous insurance claims (maybe)/safety hazards?

Any ideas/comments are appreciated. Thank you!

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handyguy said: <blockquote><hr> <br><br>The most Negative mind was the architect, what were they thinking? <br> <br><... (more)

dj (Nov. 21, 2006 @ 7:12p) |

I just purchased a home in Georgia, and would not even consider any home with a steep driveway. I didn't care how cheap... (more)

Calcbunny1 (Nov. 21, 2006 @ 9:13p) |

fatskillet said: <blockquote><hr>Why is everyone so negative? Fatwallet/Finance is for questions dealing w/ $$$...after ... (more)

soundtechie (Nov. 22, 2006 @ 8:29a) |

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s**t flows downhill <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-happy.gif" border=0>

Seriously though, this does not belong in the FWF forum.
Troll for free civil engineering advice elsewhere.

Pics ??

Built by the same company who designed this?

Impossible to say without an onsite inspection.

40% off market? What market?

If there were a cheap/easy way to fix it, the house would not be 40% off; unless there are other problems with it that you aren't considering/haven't found.

... leave our forum free of clutter please

GA Tax assessor appraised at $200,000 but due to extremely steep driveway and a minor plumbing problem, offered for $120,000. The neighborhood has similar design/construction and sell for $210-220K... only difference is driveway.

If I hire an inspector, would they be able to state the actual problem w/ the driveway and if they do, where do I go from there? Apart from probably being a good investment, my family loved the house, so this purchase could turn out to be an emotional (not a rational) one.

Having a townhouse, none of the driveway problems are clear to me.

lostdude said: [Q]Impossible to say without an onsite inspection.
40% off market? What market?

Here is some idea:

1. Park your car on the street and use the garage for something else, like put a pool table there.
2. Dig out a section big enough for your car and use it as your new garage?
3. Convert it to stairs to improve safety?

As for mail, can you just put a mailbox on the street level?

Thanks..appreciated.

wshtb said: [Q]Here is some idea:

1. Park your car on the street and use the garage for something else, like put a pool table there.
2. Dig out a section big enough for your car and use it as your new garage?
3. Convert it to stairs to improve safety?

As for mail, can you just put a mailbox on the street level?

I'm not a Civil PE but your question is not a engineering question.

-Asked your insurance agent on HO insurance. Because of the steep driveway, liability could be an issue. Even if you do get insurance, potential issue like this can cause them to drop your coverage at any time.

-It's not uncommon to see "hillside garage" in San Fran and Seattle. Like this Text but the cost could be high, which is not much of an issue for houses valued at $850k to start.

-You already knew this but for the n00bs, know that tax appraised value got NOTHING to do with market value.

-Impossible to say if the driveway can be redone to a lower slope wo looking at it. If you do have the space to have another loop around it would probably cost more than the house is worth.




TTIUWP

fatskillet said: [Q]Posted previously in rental/investment property thread, searched Fatwallet for this, but didn't find any info/reply:

I found a property that has been decreased to 40% off of market value because of a steep concrete driveway. I live in GA, so snow isn't a problem, but it looks like no one of the buyers who saw it before me is willing to reconstruct or redesign the driveway in a way that would allow easier access; most wouldn't even bother to climb up or try to drive up the steep hill. I guess, not only parking in the garage, but moving in is close to impossible.

Is anyone aware of an easy (or moderate-to-easy) way of rebuilding the driveway to allow 2WD vehicles access to the garage (currently only 4x4 can do that)?
What issues are related to a steep incline (obtaining insurance, safety, mail/package delivery)?

Please comment on the following possible driveway solutions (or any other you think could be relevant):
1)"mud jacking"
2)pouring additional layer of concrete
3)completely removing old driveway/building anew

Since this is a "no-disclosure sale", how could I get more info on the property's history/previous insurance claims (maybe)/safety hazards?

Any ideas/comments are appreciated. Thank you!

mud jacking is good


Completely remove and dispose of old driveway. Carve out space for 2 or 3 cars at base of slope, have retaining walls built to code all around, pour a concrete driveway, add a stone or wood staircase that goes up to perhaps a deck first, then another stairway up to the house. All of this would probably cost 50 or 60k at least.

You could still move furniture in/out, but would have to rent a hydraulic scaffolding contraption.

Mud jacking raises structures, so not sure what structure you are thinking of raising ?

Way of rebuilding a giant hill? Are you serious?

The only options you have are:
1: Wrap driveway back and forth your lot up the hill to make the effective grade less steep. will only work if you have a large lot, or it'll look like this
2: Fill in the road and surrouding 1 square mile with dirt so the house isn't so far off the road
3: Build batcave under house, park there, and have have elevator deliver you to the house
4: Install a hill-climber tram
5: Install a permanent 10ton+ winch at the garage, and hook a cable on your car/truck each time you get home to basically make you car a tram.

So why are you interested in this house? If the current sellers are taking a 40% hit, how much do you plan to lose?

Post a photo or a link to a photo and maybe some of us can give you ideas.

get a contractor out there and see what it will cost to fix.

miserly said: [Q]get a contractor out there and see what it will cost to fix.

I bet it will cost somewhere around 40% of the value of the house.

xoneinax said: [Q]You could still move furniture in/out, but would have to rent a hydraulic scaffolding contraption.

Or 5 college students, a few 12-packs and some pizza

PS If there was ever an example of a thread that didn't belong here, this was it. How hard is it to do this?

maybe 42%

San Franscico has lots of steep hills. I am sure you've heard of the crookest street. Maybe redesign your driveway like the famous Russian Hill:

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/object/article?o=3&f=/gallery/photoessays/2000/06/30/russianhill.DTL&type=printable



fatskillet said: [Q]Is anyone aware of an easy (or moderate-to-easy) way of rebuilding the driveway to allow 2WD vehicles access to the garage (currently only 4x4 can do that)?Why not just buy a 4x4? Sounds like it would be cheaper.

I know some folks who live at the top of a steep hill. They park their cars at the bottom and have an old 4x4 pickup that they use strictly for driving up and down the driveway in the winter. Much cheaper solution than grading and paving.


Go to Home Depot!

Buy it for 120K, and sell it sight unseen to a person that flips houses for 150K. They'll see the 50K-60K profit and start drooling. You make a cool 30K, and you pass on the problem. I've heard of flippers buying house sight unseen, although the professionals say that you not supposed to do it.

Why don't you measure the rise for us so we know what you are talking about?

It's easy to correct. First, raise the street, second, lower the house.

Why is everyone so negative? Fatwallet/Finance is for questions dealing w/ $$$...after all, it comes down to making an investment in a house that has a problem unknown to me until now. I tried 2 civil engineering forums before Fatwallet, but the topic got locked because they only answer questions to people working in the field. My question was considered "a question from student" trying to solve their homework...go figure<img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-smile.gif" border=0>

Thanks to everyone who contributed. I will try to get more specifics for the driveway.



ILikeDollars said: [Q]xoneinax said: [Q]You could still move furniture in/out, but would have to rent a hydraulic scaffolding contraption.

Or 5 college students, a few 12-packs and some pizza

PS If there was ever an example of a thread that didn't belong here, this was it. How hard is it to do this?

I forgot, that is why I don't visit the Dork room, I mean finance forum.
There is a mod alert button, use it and request that the topic be moved and you can get back to discussing how you would like to have sexual realations with Alan Greenspan.

First off if it is on a steep incline why would mudjacking do anything? Mudjacking is for sunken concrete. Does the driveway slope away from the house or into the house?

Impossible to give a definitive answer online without more data, including a elevation map and photos.

Sometimes a fool will save a few bucks and cheap it out, but generally if there was an easy way it would have been done already, but of course the are exceptions.

With prices soaring over the last few years I've seen some aggressive approaches to hillside access. If you have enough $$$, there's probably a remedy.

You really need to get contractor experienced in excavation. earth moving and construction.

MaxMojo said: [Q]Impossible to give a definitive answer online without more data, including a elevation map and photos.

Sometimes a fool will save a few bucks and cheap it out, but generally if there was an easy way it would have been done already, but of course the are exceptions.

With prices soaring over the last few years I've seen some aggressive approaches to hillside access. If you have enough $$$, there's probably a remedy.

You really need to get contractor experienced in excavation. earth moving and construction.

That goes back to my point.
We really need pictures to make any suggestions.

This gets my vote:

Blluitt said: [Q]1: Wrap driveway back and forth your lot up the hill to make the effective grade less steep.

"Why is everyone so negative?"

The most Negative mind was the architect, what were they thinking? First year student? Why build a house for which is there is almost no access to it e.g. fors bikes, walkups, strollers?

Maybe if there is room, build a new driveway on the other side?

handyguy said: [Q]

The most Negative mind was the architect, what were they thinking?


In my small town of 20,000, houses around $200,000 are not designed by architects, they are designed by the house builders.Some who know how to do a site properly and some who don't.I've been in commercial and heavy construction management for over 30 years and have seen it all.
Without photos or plans, no one can give the OP any advise.

I just purchased a home in Georgia, and would not even consider any home with a steep driveway. I didn't care how cheap it was. If resale is not an issue and you don't worry about kids rolling down the hill into traffic, I say go for it!

fatskillet said: [Q]Why is everyone so negative? Fatwallet/Finance is for questions dealing w/ $$$...after all, it comes down to making an investment in a house that has a problem unknown to me until now. I tried 2 civil engineering forums before Fatwallet, but the topic got locked because they only answer questions to people working in the field. My question was considered "a question from student" trying to solve their homework...go figure<img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-smile.gif" border=0>



They're beingn negative because the prevailing opinion in FWF is that it is *not* a forum for questions dealing with money, it's a forum to post financial deals in.



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