• Page :
  • 1
  • Text Only
rated:

Acrobat
Disclaimer
Another Adobe Reader frustration. Apparently, my private email address with Adobe has been compromised.

I use wildcards for my email address when submitting my email address to companies. I just got an email sent to macromedia@url.com . It tells me that I should update to the newest Acrobat Reader with a link to a suspicious site.

Now, I've only used the macromedia@url.com with Adobe/Macromedia. I suspect their database has been compromised and the phishing/trojans are beginning.

Anyhow, be warned.


edit:
The URL is www.adobe-download2.info
It redirects to www.adobe-acrobat-download.com which is now offline.

Member Summary
Quick Summary is created and edited by users like you... Add FAQ's, Links and other Relevant Information by clicking the edit button in the lower right hand corner of this message.
Thanks for visiting FatWallet.com. Join for free to remove this ad.

I got the same thing! When I clicked on it, it put an Adobe Reader shortcut on my desktop!

I'm doomed! I think I will have to get a new computer now!

Flatbob said:   I got the same thing! When I clicked on it, it put an Adobe Reader shortcut on my desktop!

I'm doomed! I think I will have to get a new computer now!


Look what it did to poor riznik's avatar!

riznick said:   I use wildcards for my email address when submitting my email address to companies. I just got an email sent to macromedia@MyDomain.com . It tells me that I should update to the newest Acrobat Reader with a link to a suspicious site.
A lot of times these days, companies provide links that use some sort of email/link tracking to see how effective their emails are at getting people to click on the links inside, and what link they used. These tracking links may use the domain of the sender, or use the domain of a third-party email marketing company that redirects to the sender's domain.

For example, an email I got from Blockbuster today has links to the domain "blockbuster.delivery.net". A quick search for the domain "delivery.net" shows that it's owned by a firm called Acxiom Digital that does email marketing:
http://www.acxiomdigital.com/services/email-marketing.asp

An Eels newsletter I got yesterday has links that go to the "suspicious sounding" domain "r20.rs6.net", however a quick search shows that this is another email marketing company:
http://ask.metafilter.com/46130/What-is-rs6net

I'm not suspicious of the source of either email, since I specifically signed up for the Eels newsletter, while the Blockbuster email is because I signed up for their DVD delivery service.


Bottom line: If you're at all suspicious of the links in an email, you should avoid them and instead open up a new tab and type the website's address directly. However, based on the above info, it's highly unlikely that Adobe had any of their databases have been hacked.

marsilies said:   riznick said:   I use wildcards for my email address when submitting my email address to companies. I just got an email sent to macromedia@MyDomain.com . It tells me that I should update to the newest Acrobat Reader with a link to a suspicious site.
A lot of times these days, companies provide links that use some sort of email/link tracking to see how effective their emails are at getting people to click on the links inside, and what link they used. These tracking links may use the domain of the sender, or use the domain of a third-party email marketing company that redirects to the sender's domain.

For example, an email I got from Blockbuster today has links to the domain "blockbuster.delivery.net". A quick search for the domain "delivery.net" shows that it's owned by a firm called Acxiom Digital that does email marketing:
http://www.acxiomdigital.com/services/email-marketing.asp

An Eels newsletter I got yesterday has links that go to the "suspicious sounding" domain "r20.rs6.net", however a quick search shows that this is another email marketing company:
http://ask.metafilter.com/46130/What-is-rs6net

I'm not suspicious of the source of either email, since I specifically signed up for the Eels newsletter, while the Blockbuster email is because I signed up for their DVD delivery service.


Bottom line: If you're at all suspicious of the links in an email, you should avoid them and instead open up a new tab and type the website's address directly. However, based on the above info, it's highly unlikely that Adobe had any of their databases have been hacked.


The URL is www.adobe-download2.info
It redirects to www.adobe-acrobat-download.com which is now offline.

Both are owned by a Russian company.

Yeah, that specific URL is a suspicious one. Googling it brought up this link:
http://www.mywot.com/en/forum/10820-suspicious-sites-adobe-acrob...

I'm still not convinced Adobe got hacked though.

marsilies said:   Yeah, that specific URL is a suspicious one. Googling it brought up this link:
http://www.mywot.com/en/forum/10820-suspicious-sites-adobe-acrob...

I'm still not convinced Adobe got hacked though.


It's an address I've only used with Macromedia/Adobe.

riznick said:   It's an address I've only used with Macromedia/Adobe.
It doesn't mean Adobe's been hacked though. As per their privacy policy, the occasionally may entrust your info to third parties acting on their behalf. It could be one of these third parties that got hacked, exposing the mailing list with your email address on it. Or the third party could be violating Adobe's privacy policy and selling it.
http://www.adobe.com/misc/privacy.html

Or, it could be someone snooping on your internet traffic (such as while connected to an unsecured wifi), or possibly a hack of your specific computer or email account.

Edit: I found this info where a "disposable" email address someone used with Macromedia was harvested by spammers, via screen scraping the site's listing of partners. It's from 2002, but since your email address was "macromedia@url.com" it stands that you used that address since before Macromedia was acquired by Adobe:
http://www.mail-archive.com/cf-talk@houseoffusion.com/msg99475.h...

marsilies said:   riznick said:   It's an address I've only used with Macromedia/Adobe.
It doesn't mean Adobe's been hacked though. As per their privacy policy, the occasionally may entrust your info to third parties acting on their behalf. It could be one of these third parties that got hacked, exposing the mailing list with your email address on it. Or the third party could be violating Adobe's privacy policy and selling it.
http://www.adobe.com/misc/privacy.html

Or, it could be someone snooping on your internet traffic (such as while connected to an unsecured wifi), or possibly a hack of your specific computer or email account.

Edit: I found this info where a "disposable" email address someone used with Macromedia was harvested by spammers, via screen scraping the site's listing of partners. It's from 2002, but since your email address was "macromedia@url.com" it stands that you used that address since before Macromedia was acquired by Adobe:
http://www.mail-archive.com/cf-talk@houseoffusion.com/msg99475.h...

I never stated it was hacked. I stated it was compromised. It may or may not have been hacked.

If Adobe gives out my email to a third party and it gets into the wrong hands, Adobe is part to blame. Furthermore, not only did it get compromised, it was then used for something malicious. I've never received any junk or spam to that specific address until this incident. My email box rarely gets any spam (maybe 1 every 6 months) due to how I distribute the addresses.

The emails on my network weren't snooped. Had they been, more mail would have come to my real address. What bothered me the most, and why I spent time looking into this is that it was a phishing email sent to a private disposable email used only for the product being phished. I really had to question whether the email was real since it came to that specific email address.

I know you are playing devil's advocate, however you must understand the odds. The fact that you gave me red, implies that you are in denial of one of the most logical possibilities.

If a third party did violate the privacy policy, then the warning is legit. If the information got compromised through a third party, then the warning is legit.

riznick said:   I never stated it was hacked. I stated it was compromised. It may or may not have been hacked.

You originally wrote:
their database has been compromised..

Which was, first off, vague (which of their databases? Did you mean just a database for email addresses for a mailing list, or something far larger?). And second off, still is possibly not true. They may have passed only part of the information to a third party, so only part of the information in whichever "database" you're referring to may have been compromised, but not their database itself.

If Adobe gives out my email to a third party and it gets into the wrong hands, Adobe is part to blame.
Partly to blame, sure (unless the address was leaked when it was still just Macromedia). However, I think your original statement that "their database has been compromised" was a little alarmist.

The emails on my network weren't snooped. Had they been, more mail would have come to my real address. What bothered me the most, and why I spent time looking into this is that it was a phishing email sent to a private disposable email used only for the product being phished. I really had to question whether the email was real since it came to that specific email address.
Isn't the point of using such addresses is for anticipation of such compromises of information, so that you can drop usage of the address with minimal changes?

I know you are playing devil's advocate, however you must understand the odds. The fact that you gave me red, implies that you are in denial of one of the most logical possibilities.
I gave red before I knew what the "suspicious url" was, and I thought your post could be an extreme overreaction, and I wanted to mute the green of the OP. I've now changed my rating to neutral. However, I'm still not 100% convinced the problem was on Adobe's side, or even one of their partners. For example, I have my email address registered with an account with Adobe, and haven't received any emails from anyone spoofing Adobe or their products.

Another frustration.

Just about all correspondence that I have sent Adobe over the years stated someone would contact me back shortly. In some cases it stated within 1 day. Never have they attempted to contact me back.

One of Adobe's other address lists has been distributed in India and i'm now receiving all this India spam advertising. (Perhaps an employee left with the address list and sold it to friends)
I used the address exclusively with their interakt group years ago, and now for the first time i get email addressed to that.
I've contacted Adobe several times, and no response.
So not only was that product for DW expensive and buggy, now they hassle me with spam.



Disclaimer: By providing links to other sites, FatWallet.com does not guarantee, approve or endorse the information or products available at these sites, nor does a link indicate any association with or endorsement by the linked site to FatWallet.com.

Thanks for visiting FatWallet.com. Join for free to remove this ad.

TRUSTe online privacy certification

While FatWallet makes every effort to post correct information, offers are subject to change without notice.
Some exclusions may apply based upon merchant policies.
© 1999-2014