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I bought a new i5 PC with Win7 Pro. The Memory Diagnostics Tools ran the Standard tests fine; but get stuck at 10% when running Extended tests. After that, it won't stop running that test on Startup. Long story short, I returned it.

I now have a refurbished i7 PC with Win7 Pro; and the same thing is happening. I google the problem; and it appears that I am not the only one with that problem. Others get stuck at different % when running Extended tests. But I haven't seen any solutions. Anyone here has run Win7' Memory Diagnostics Tools in Extended mode with no problem? Or has determine what the problem was?

I am running Memtest86+ v4.2 on the i7 PC. It ran the Default tests for just under 7 hours (8 passes), with no errors. I see 9 tests under the Configuration. Upon closer attention, I noticed that it does not run Test #9 -- Bit Fade Test. So, using the Configuration, I specifically select Test #9. And it doesn't appear to run that test. The screen shows [... 90 minutes, 2 patterns]. Attached is an image of the screen after 1 hour. Anyone knows that Test #9 and why it doesn't seem to run?

Separately, right below the test pattern, it shows i7-3770CPU @ 3.40GHz, which I believe means 3rd generation. But on top left, it shows Intel Core Gen2 3392 MHz. What does Gen2 refer to? And 3392 MHz? It also shows that the RAM speed is a little off.

Member Summary
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Ramaxel, claimed to be the #1 brand of RAM in China: "Beyond extreme, create legendary Chinese speed". IOW you were so... (more)

larrymoencurly (Feb. 15, 2013 @ 6:10p) |

In all the test I have run so far -- about 6 hours each -- no errors reported.

I downloaded the trial version of both 5.0... (more)

confused200 (Feb. 16, 2013 @ 10:59p) |

I don't think you're doing anything wrong, and the problem may simply be a matter of the floppy having some files that G... (more)

larrymoencurly (Feb. 18, 2013 @ 6:33a) |


I seem to recall that some tests don't run on certain chipsets. Something about compatibility if I remember correctly. So I wouldn't worry about that.

minidrag said:   I seem to recall that some tests don't run on certain chipsets. Something about compatibility if I remember correctly. So I wouldn't worry about that.
You are referring to Memtest? Are there Extended tests? Or do I just let it run longer? Generally, how long should I run Memtest to be sure?

TIA

Yes, I was referring to Memtest. I would allow the tests to run overnight and no, I don't believe there are any 'extended' tests - just run it and let it do its thing.

what has prompted you to run memory diagnostics?

i usually only run memory tests if i suspect a problem, or see some odd behavior and wouldn't bother otherwise,

for a new machine i might run a burn in, or stress test

skh12 said:   what has prompted you to run memory diagnostics?

i usually only run memory tests if i suspect a problem, or see some odd behavior and wouldn't bother otherwise,

for a new machine i might run a burn in, or stress test

I need to add more RAM on a new PC; and I was advised to test the RAM I buy. So when I stumble upon Win7's Memory Diagnostics Tools, I was curious and tried it; and it got stuck @ 10% doing the Extended tests.

What is stress test? Is there any free software that I can use to do that?

sandra

i would test ram if i was buying bulk or used RAM, i never test ram (almost) unless the system is acting up

Memtest is a different diagnostic from MemTest86+ and MemTest86 and is not as good.

It's possible the memory diagnostics are freezing because they're occupying defective memory, and if swapping around the modules makes any difference, that could be the case, even if it causes a different type of crash.

MemTest86+ ver. 5.00b1 (beta) is now available and fixes many errors in ver. 4.2.

binary
CD/DVD .ISO image
USB flash drive creator

Also try Gold Memory from here or here because it sometimes finds errors that nothing else does (review -- yes, that's the newest review available for memory diagnostics).

What brand of memory modules are in your computer?

If your computer is a famous make (Dell, Gateway, HP, Sony) and its memory was installed at the factory, it's probably fine, but the vast majority of aftermarket memory is low quality and made from chips that were either factory rejects (common with slower speeds, like PC10666) or overclocked (about everything else -- run 30% to 60% over recommended speeds). Heatsinks are a sign of low quality and serve no function and exist only for marketing and to hide the fact that the chips under them are low quality or too slow. About the only way to be guaranteed of high quality memory is by choosing Samsung or no-heatsink Crucial modules, but sometimes you can get lucky with other brands of no-heatsink modules.

I always test memory overnight with at least 2 different diagnostics if it has heatsinks or house branded chips because few module manufacturers test thoroughly (most use just PCs), and about 10% of my modules have failed testing.

larrymoencurly said:   Memtest is a different diagnostic from MemTest86+ and MemTest86 and is not as good.

It's possible the memory diagnostics are freezing because they're occupying defective memory, and if swapping around the modules makes any difference, that could be the case, even if it causes a different type of crash.

MemTest86+ ver. 5.00b1 (beta) is now available and fixes many errors in ver. 4.2.

binary
CD/DVD .ISO image
USB flash drive creator

Also try Gold Memory from here or here because it sometimes finds errors that nothing else does (review -- yes, that's the newest review available for memory diagnostics).

What brand of memory modules are in your computer?

If your computer is a famous make (Dell, Gateway, HP, Sony) and its memory was installed at the factory, it's probably fine, but the vast majority of aftermarket memory is low quality and made from chips that were either factory rejects (common with slower speeds, like PC10666) or overclocked (about everything else -- run 30% to 60% over recommended speeds). Heatsinks are a sign of low quality and serve no function and exist only for marketing and to hide the fact that the chips under them are low quality or too slow. About the only way to be guaranteed of high quality memory is by choosing Samsung or no-heatsink Crucial modules, but sometimes you can get lucky with other brands of no-heatsink modules.

I always test memory overnight with at least 2 different diagnostics if it has heatsinks or house branded chips because few module manufacturers test thoroughly (most use just PCs), and about 10% of my modules have failed testing.

The PC is a refurbished HP I got 10 days ago.

Thanks for the links to Memtest86+ v 5 and Gold. Is beta safe to use by non-techies?

And is there a way to put both Memtest 86+ and Gold on the same self-booting flash drive? I guess I need a DOS batch file to ask me to choose which program I want to run? Can anyone help?

TIA

confused200 said:   And is there a way to put both Memtest 86+ and Gold on the same self-booting flash drive? I guess I need a DOS batch file to ask me to choose which program I want to run? Can anyone help?

You can use this tool to boot multiple ISOs off the same USB drive:
http://www.pendrivelinux.com/yumi-multiboot-usb-creator/

confused200 said:   The PC is a refurbished HP I got 10 days ago.

Thanks for the links to Memtest86+ v 5 and Gold. Is beta safe to use by non-techies?
Self-booting memory diagnostics are always safe to run because they never write stuff to your hard disk, but if you're worried, run with the hard disk power cable unplugged.

You may also want to try MemTest86 ver. 4.1.0 (link) because despite MemTest86+ being based on it, the two programs sometimes give different results.

Any idea of the memory in that HP? Don't remove it to check, unless the computer is completely turned off (AC power cord removed) because in suspend mode the memory still has power going to it. A program like CPU-Z (runs from Windows) can help identify the memory (under its "SPD" tab), provided the manufacturer wrote that information into the modules.

marsilies said:   confused200 said:   And is there a way to put both Memtest 86+ and Gold on the same self-booting flash drive? I guess I need a DOS batch file to ask me to choose which program I want to run? Can anyone help?

You can use this tool to boot multiple ISOs off the same USB drive:
http://www.pendrivelinux.com/yumi-multiboot-usb-creator/

Thanks for the link. I will look into it.

larrymoencurly said:   confused200 said:   The PC is a refurbished HP I got 10 days ago.

Thanks for the links to Memtest86+ v 5 and Gold. Is beta safe to use by non-techies?
Self-booting memory diagnostics are always safe to run because they never write stuff to your hard disk, but if you're worried, run with the hard disk power cable unplugged.

You may also want to try MemTest86 ver. 4.1.0 (link) because despite MemTest86+ being based on it, the two programs sometimes give different results.

Any idea of the memory in that HP? Don't remove it to check, unless the computer is completely turned off (AC power cord removed) because in suspend mode the memory still has power going to it. A program like CPU-Z (runs from Windows) can help identify the memory (under its "SPD" tab), provided the manufacturer wrote that information into the modules.

Thanks. I am running 4.1 now.

When I looked at CPU-Z, the supported hardware includes i7; but not Chipset Q77 Express that is in my PC. Should I run the CPU-z?

confused200 said:   When I looked at CPU-Z, the supported hardware includes i7; but not Chipset Q77 Express that is in my PC. Should I run the CPU-z?Yes, or open the computer and look at the memory modules themselves.

larrymoencurly said:   confused200 said:   When I looked at CPU-Z, the supported hardware includes i7; but not Chipset Q77 Express that is in my PC. Should I run the CPU-z?Yes, or open the computer and look at the memory modules themselves.
I ran the CPU-Z; and there is nothing under SPD tab.

I didn't watch the previous Memtests closely. But I did watch some of the tests in Memtest86v4.1 this time; and I don't understand one part of it. On the "Testing" line, it flashes different # for different tests. e.g.

2048M - 3488M 1440M of 3971M

4096M - 4590M 494M of 3971M

I would think "2048M - 3488M" means that it is testing the 3rd & 4thGB of RAM. But what does "1440M of 3971M" on the same line mean? And since I have only 4GB of RAM, what does 4590M refer to?

I am now running memtest86+ 5beta. The SPD info shows Ramaxel RMR5040ED58E9W1600; and the test shows the Timings to be CAS 6-6-6-20.

Memtest86+ v.5beta shows 8 Cores. The i7 3770 is 4-Cores (and that is what was reported by memtest86 v4.1). So what is that 8 Cores refer to???

you're still messing around with that, man i have been in computer electronics engineering for 20+ years and have never put this much effort into testing RAM

confused200 said:   Memtest86+ v.5beta shows 8 Cores. The i7 3770 is 4-Cores (and that is what was reported by memtest86 v4.1). So what is that 8 Cores refer to???
That chip is Hyperthreaded, meaning that each core can process two threads simultaneously. This causes each core to show up as two cores, not just in Memtest, but also in Windows.
http://ark.intel.com/products/65719/

marsilies said:   confused200 said:   Memtest86+ v.5beta shows 8 Cores. The i7 3770 is 4-Cores (and that is what was reported by memtest86 v4.1). So what is that 8 Cores refer to???
That chip is Hyperthreaded, meaning that each core can process two threads simultaneously. This causes each core to show up as two cores, not just in Memtest, but also in Windows.
http://ark.intel.com/products/65719/

Thanks.

Duplicate; deleted.

confused200 said:   I didn't watch the previous Memtests closely. But I did watch some of the tests in Memtest86v4.1 this time; and I don't understand one part of it. On the "Testing" line, it flashes different # for different tests. e.g.

2048M - 3488M 1440M of 3971M

4096M - 4590M 494M of 3971M

I would think "2048M - 3488M" means that it is testing the 3rd & 4thGB of RAM. But what does "1440M of 3971M" on the same line mean? And since I have only 4GB of RAM, what does 4590M refer to?

I am now running memtest86+ 5beta. The SPD info shows Ramaxel RMR5040ED58E9W1600; and the test shows the Timings to be CAS 6-6-6-20.

Memtest86+ v.5beta shows 8 Cores. The i7 3770 is 4-Cores (and that is what was reported by memtest86 v4.1). So what is that 8 Cores refer to???

Ramaxel, claimed to be the #1 brand of RAM in China: "Beyond extreme, create legendary Chinese speed". IOW you were sold junk RAM and have to test it like crazy. BTW MemTest86+ ver. 5 beta is buggy and reported loads of errors when I ran it with Samsung modules (very reliable) in a Z68 motherboard. MemTest86 ver. 4.1 is also likely buggy, but ver. 3.5b and MemTest86+ ver. 4.20 work well.

I have no idea what 4590M can mean with 4GB, which is 4,294,967,296 bytes, but I wonder if it's related to the diagnostic reporting 8 cores for your 4 core CPU. Because you have 4GB in the system, try running Gold Memory ver. 5.07 rather than ver. 6.92 because it does more tests, even in the trial ware version.

larrymoencurly said:   confused200 said:   I didn't watch the previous Memtests closely. But I did watch some of the tests in Memtest86v4.1 this time; and I don't understand one part of it. On the "Testing" line, it flashes different # for different tests. e.g.

2048M - 3488M 1440M of 3971M

4096M - 4590M 494M of 3971M

I would think "2048M - 3488M" means that it is testing the 3rd & 4thGB of RAM. But what does "1440M of 3971M" on the same line mean? And since I have only 4GB of RAM, what does 4590M refer to?

I am now running memtest86+ 5beta. The SPD info shows Ramaxel RMR5040ED58E9W1600; and the test shows the Timings to be CAS 6-6-6-20.

Memtest86+ v.5beta shows 8 Cores. The i7 3770 is 4-Cores (and that is what was reported by memtest86 v4.1). So what is that 8 Cores refer to???

Ramaxel, claimed to be the #1 brand of RAM in China: "Beyond extreme, create legendary Chinese speed". IOW you were sold junk RAM and have to test it like crazy. BTW MemTest86+ ver. 5 beta is buggy and reported loads of errors when I ran it with Samsung modules (very reliable) in a Z68 motherboard. MemTest86 ver. 4.1 is also likely buggy, but ver. 3.5b and MemTest86+ ver. 4.20 work well.

I have no idea what 4590M can mean with 4GB, which is 4,294,967,296 bytes, but I wonder if it's related to the diagnostic reporting 8 cores for your 4 core CPU. Because you have 4GB in the system, try running Gold Memory ver. 5.07 rather than ver. 6.92 because it does more tests, even in the trial ware version.

In all the test I have run so far -- about 6 hours each -- no errors reported.

I downloaded the trial version of both 5.07 & 6.92; but I can't get them to run. Since none of my PCs has an internal floppy drive, and GoldMemory fails to install on my external floppy drive, I made a bootable floppy and copy gm.exe to the floppy. Then I boot from the external floppy, type gm; and get the following errors:

The GM 5.07 states "Extended Memory driver Detected" and quit.
The FM 6.92 states "Cant' run, XMS driver Detected" and quit.
And GM does not run in Windows.

What am I doing wrong?

TIA

confused200 said:   I downloaded the trial version of both 5.07 & 6.92; but I can't get them to run. Since none of my PCs has an internal floppy drive, and GoldMemory fails to install on my external floppy drive, I made a bootable floppy and copy gm.exe to the floppy. Then I boot from the external floppy, type gm; and get the following errors:

The GM 5.07 states "Extended Memory driver Detected" and quit.
The GM 6.92 states "Can't run, XMS driver Detected" and quit.
And GM does not run in Windows.

What am I doing wrong?

I don't think you're doing anything wrong, and the problem may simply be a matter of the floppy having some files that Gold Memory doesn't like, such as EMM386.SYS (EMM386.EXE ?) and HIMEM.SYS, both which are probably listed in a CONFIG.SYS text file. Put a "REM " (including trailing spaces) in front of each line that lists them.

I just tried creating a bootable USB flash drive for Gold Memory 5.07 by using HP's USB flash formatter. To make it bootable, MS-DOS compatible boot files are needed, which you should be able get from a Windows CD or DVD (MSDOS.SYS, IO.SYS, and COMMAND.COM) or FreeDOS.org. Linux boot files are not compatible, but that's what MemTest86+ uses when it creates bootable media.

If you want to make a bootable USB flash drive for MemTest86, the easiest way may be by running the installer for MemTest86+ to create a bootable flash drive. Then download the MemTest86 package (floppy, CD, or USB flash version), rename the downloaded package with a .ZIP extension, and then extract the PRECOMP.BIN file from the .ZIP archie. Rename PRECOMP.BIN to MT86PLUS. (no extension), and copy it to the USB flash drive. It's that simple. The reason to try MemTest86 is because MemTest86+ has never found a legitimate error for me, while MemTest86 has found many.



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