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A friend's family member will be taking a Windows class in the local community college but the instructor insist on using Windows 7 but her new laptop comes with pre-installed Win 8.

My understanding is only Win 8 Pro has downgrade right and I'm quite sure the laptop does not comes with Win 8 Pro. However, he does have Windows 7 upgrade family pack (x3 licenses). Can he use this to downgrade the Windows 8 machine?

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What kind of class is this? You can install something like "classic shell" and have a windows 8 box that is very similar to a windows 7 one.

I do think that Windows 8 with Classic Shell will look/work very similarly to Windows 7. That said, since this class is specifically about learning Windows, it sounds like the instructor doesn't want to have to deal with even the minor differences that may pop up.

The Windows 7 Upgrade Family Pack should work from a licensing standpoint. However, it will have to be a "custom" install, meaning the laptop will lose any pre-installed programs and such, and user data will have to be moved over. Also, you should check to make sure Windows 7 drivers are available for all the hardware in the laptop. I know some manufacturers aren't providing Windows 7 drivers for recent Windows 8 laptops.

I would tell the family friend to look for another class. Seems like a lot to go through, especially with a new laptop, just to satisfy some instructor. Asthe other poster stated, classic shell installed on Win 8, makes the computer act like Win 7.

backsplatter said:   What kind of class is this? You can install something like "classic shell" and have a windows 8 box that is very similar to a windows 7 one.ya, that's what I said but I do not have any personal experience with Win 8 and classic shell so I'm hesitant to recommend that. Thanks all.

Not a fan of Windows 8 either? Thanks Microsoft for your need to monopolize even more on the common PC user.

Install Windows 7 as a virtual machine using Virtual Box or something similar. That way they can keep Windows 8 on their laptop. Personally, I'd buy a full used copy of Windows 7 off eBay, use it for the class, uninstall it, then resell it for about what I paid.

BADADVICE said:   Install Windows 7 as a virtual machine using Virtual Box or something similar. That way they can keep Windows 8 on their laptop. Personally, I'd buy a full used copy of Windows 7 off eBay, use it for the class, uninstall it, then resell it for about what I paid.
I'm a bit wary of buying copies of Windows off eBay, since there's the potential for bootleg copies, and even if it's legit there may be activation issues. Considering the person in the OP already has a copy of Windows 7 to use, there's no reason for them to use eBay.

If going with a VM, one could also use one of the free Windows 7 VMs Microsoft supplies for testing Internet Explorer:
http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=11575


However, considering that the friend's family member is taking a Windows class at a community college, my guess is that it's to learn how to use Windows. I don't think it'd make sense to learn about one OS and use another. Plus, messing with VMs is more advanced than someone taking a Windows class is likely up to handling.

Expect for a few edges cases, Windows 8 with classic shell is the same as windows 7 expects it boots faster.

But I would take a different class if I were you or your friend.

Hypersion said:   Expect for a few edges cases, Windows 8 with classic shell is the same as windows 7 expects it boots faster.

But I would take a different class if I where you or your friend.


Yeah no doubt. Today kids, we are going to learn about computers. But before we do, I insist we only use an Operating system that isn't available on a new computer anymore.

clearanceman said:   Yeah no doubt. Today kids, we are going to learn about computers. But before we do, I insist we only use an Operating system that isn't available on a new computer anymore.
1) That's not true - there are plenty of new machines available with Windows 7 on them.

2) Windows 7 is still on a LOT of existing machines. Why should there not be a class teaching it?

Windows is complicated. I am not happy with its performance either.

clearanceman said:   Hypersion said:   Expect for a few edges cases, Windows 8 with classic shell is the same as windows 7 expects it boots faster.

But I would take a different class if I where you or your friend.


Yeah no doubt. Today kids, we are going to learn about computers. But before we do, I insist we only use an Operating system that isn't available on a new computer anymore.
Yeah, that does sound kind of sketchy. But this is a community college so perhaps the "professor" is just somebody moonlighting for some extra cash. He/she may be even worse with Win 8 than I am, and I didn't think that was possible.

Sonofspam said:   clearanceman said:   Hypersion said:   Expect for a few edges cases, Windows 8 with classic shell is the same as windows 7 expects it boots faster.

But I would take a different class if I where you or your friend.


Yeah no doubt. Today kids, we are going to learn about computers. But before we do, I insist we only use an Operating system that isn't available on a new computer anymore.
Yeah, that does sound kind of sketchy. But this is a community college so perhaps the "professor" is just somebody moonlighting for some extra cash. He/she may be even worse with Win 8 than I am, and I didn't think that was possible.

Sorry, I don't agree with this line or reasoning at all. Windows 7 will be around for a long time and many business still even have Windows XP. There are some very good reasons to be learning it and teaching it.

Just because something new comes out does not mean people shouldn't learn the older things. Model 2014 cars are coming out - should auto mechanic classes stop teaching on 2010 cars now?



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