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Hello friends!
I am at a crossroads, trying to decide which technology is the best for my next car.  I am weighing in all the pros and cons of Electric vs. Hybrid vs. Flex Fuel vs. Gasoline vs. Diesel cars and SUVs. 
I like to keep my cars for 10 years before selling or trading.
As a family, we like to travel.  The Electric and Hybrid cars and SUVs have shorter driving range than Gasoline and E85 Flex Fuel vehicles.  So, the Electrics and the Hybrids lose points in that category.  But, they are supposed to be cheaper when we factor in the federal tax credit, and lesser fuel cost over 10 years.  Is it actually true?
Has anyone done any research on the total cost of ownership over a 10 year period for popular model Electric vs. Hybrid vs. Flex Fuel vs. Gasoline SUVs and cars?
 

Member Summary

I don't have an answer, but you are missing something in your list. Diesel.

http://www.digitaltrends.com/cars/are-diesel-powered-cars-better... 

-edit - well, thanks FW for auto linking 'Diesel' to a site that sells clothing...

Free1As1A1Bird said:   Hello friends!
I am at a crossroads, trying to decide which technology is the best for my next car.  I am weighing in all the pros and cons of Electric vs. Hybrid vs. Flex Fuel vs. Gasoline cars and SUVs. 
I like to keep my cars for 10 years before selling or trading.
As a family, we like to travel.  The Electric and Hybrid cars and SUVs have shorter driving range than Gasoline and E85 Flex Fuel vehicles.  So, the Electrics and the Hybrids lose points in that category.  But, they are supposed to be cheaper when we factor in the federal tax credit, and lesser fuel cost over 10 years.  Is it actually true?
Has anyone done any research on the total cost of ownership over a 10 year period for popular model Electric vs. Hybrid vs. Flex Fuel vs. Gasoline SUVs and cars?

  
You need to provide more details.  What exact vehicles are you comparing?  How many miles do you drive each year? etc.

There are articles online that state you need to drive at least 15000 miles per year for 10 years to offset the additional costs of an electric car with the savings from fuel (even after the tax benefits). I personally think that hybrid and flex fuel make more sense at this time. What models are you looking at?

Forget MPG this is what everyone should be using to look at gas savings.

Link MIles per Dollar

Using 150,000 miles or the average miles for a 10 year life span I get these numbers for just fuel.

150k miles for a 20 mpg vehicle at $3.50 gal is $26250 in fuel.
150k miles for a 30 mpg vehicle at $3.50 gal is $17500 in fuel.
150k miles for a 40 mpg vehicle at $3.50 gal is $13125 in fuel.
150k miles for a 50 mpg vehicle at $3.50 gal is $10500 in fuel.

The savings from 20 to 30 mpg ($8750) compared to 40mpg to 50mpg ($2675) is correct. There is some mathematical reason for this that hopefully someone else can explain or I can explain later.

Forget tax credits, Virginia is about to do the opposite.
Link

You probably won't be finding any manufacturer able to give tax credits for a hybrid vehicle anymore, most of those have dried up AFAIK.
Electric vehicles, good luck travelling in that beyond it's range.  Plus they are all smaller commuter type vehicles to begin with.  I assume this isn't going to fit your needs.
Hybrid vehicles range is not shorter than a gasoline vehicle really, so those are OK.  The question is will the price premium for better MPG offset the total cost of ownership over the 10 years. 
Diesel is another option as well as another poster mentioned.
Really you need to decide what type of vehicle you want first, then look at the options. 
(E85 is a joke, I wouldn't even bother looking at those if I were you.)

Zuke76 said:   The savings from 20 to 30 mpg ($8750) compared to 40mpg to 50mpg ($2675) is correct. There is some mathematical reason for this that hopefully someone else can explain or I can explain later.


 

Diminishing returns.  From 20 -> 30 is a 50% increase in MPG or a 33.3% decrease in GPM.  From 40 -> 50 is only a 25% increase in MPG or a 20% decrease in GPM.

comprx said:   
Zuke76 said:   The savings from 20 to 30 mpg ($8750) compared to 40mpg to 50mpg ($2675) is correct. There is some mathematical reason for this that hopefully someone else can explain or I can explain later.


 

Diminishing returns.  From 20 -> 30 is a 50% increase in MPG or a 33.3% decrease in GPM.  From 40 -> 50 is only a 25% increase in MPG or a 20% decrease in GPM.

   
Thanks my brain wasn't working last night when I posted this. 

My GF has a used Ford Escape Hybrid (2010?)... I'm really impressed with it. No need to plug in and great short mileage.

minidrag said:   I don't have an answer, but you are missing something in your list. Diesel.

http://www.digitaltrends.com/cars/are-diesel-powered-cars-better...  

-edit - well, thanks FW for auto linking 'Diesel' to a site that sells clothing...

  Edited, thanks

NxN2005 said:   
Free1As1A1Bird said:   Hello friends!
I am at a crossroads, trying to decide which technology is the best for my next car.  I am weighing in all the pros and cons of Electric vs. Hybrid vs. Flex Fuel vs. Gasoline cars and SUVs. 
I like to keep my cars for 10 years before selling or trading.
As a family, we like to travel.  The Electric and Hybrid cars and SUVs have shorter driving range than Gasoline and E85 Flex Fuel vehicles.  So, the Electrics and the Hybrids lose points in that category.  But, they are supposed to be cheaper when we factor in the federal tax credit, and lesser fuel cost over 10 years.  Is it actually true?
Has anyone done any research on the total cost of ownership over a 10 year period for popular model Electric vs. Hybrid vs. Flex Fuel vs. Gasoline SUVs and cars?

  
You need to provide more details.  What exact vehicles are you comparing?  How many miles do you drive each year? etc.

  We like road -trips and plan to drive 140k miles over 10 years. We like mid size sedans like Nissan Altima or small SUVs like Toyota Rav4 or Honda CRV.

dmccall4 said:   There are articles online that state you need to drive at least 15000 miles per year for 10 years to offset the additional costs of an electric car with the savings from fuel (even after the tax benefits). I personally think that hybrid and flex fuel make more sense at this time. What models are you looking at?
    Nissan Altima or Toyota Rav4/Prius or Honda CRV.

FriendlyPeon said:   You probably won't be finding any manufacturer able to give tax credits for a hybrid vehicle anymore, most of those have dried up AFAIK.
Electric vehicles, good luck travelling in that beyond it's range.  Plus they are all smaller commuter type vehicles to begin with.  I assume this isn't going to fit your needs.
Hybrid vehicles range is not shorter than a gasoline vehicle really, so those are OK.  The question is will the price premium for better MPG offset the total cost of ownership over the 10 years. 
Diesel is another option as well as another poster mentioned.
Really you need to decide what type of vehicle you want first, then look at the options. 
(E85 is a joke, I wouldn't even bother looking at those if I were you.)

   Nissan Altima or Toyota Rav4/Prius or Honda CRV.

If the OP's priority is hauling people the best option seems to be a Nissan Altima 2.5 SV (mid-level).

If more cargo than human hauling is the priority then either a '14 Nissan Rogue 2.5 SV (same engine as the Altima, but w/-15hp) or a mid-level '13 or '14 Toyota Rav4 (also w/a 2.5L I4, pretty much Camry-sourced).

billetera said:   If the OP's priority is hauling people the best option seems to be a Nissan Altima 2.5 SV (mid-level).

If more cargo than human hauling is the priority then either a '14 Nissan Rogue 2.5 SV (same engine as the Altima, but w/-15hp) or a mid-level '13 or '14 Toyota Rav4 (also w/a 2.5L I4, pretty much Camry-sourced).

  Rogue vs. RAV4 - which one would you pick?  I personally like RAV4 because Consumer Reports gave it higher ratings.

billetera said:   If the OP's priority is hauling people the best option seems to be a Nissan Altima 2.5 SV (mid-level).
 

Mazda 5.

" Rogue vs. RAV4 - which one would you pick?"

Depends on what offer (for '14 MY Rogue vs. '13 or '14 MY Rav4) the dealer gave you for a midline model with the features you want... Otherwise I feel it's a wash (regular '14 Rogues are slightly more fuel efficient and normally slightly more inexpensive while the Toyota brand is felt better by others). In this class of crossover the CVT tranny is not too much of an issue (it would be on any 250+HP vehicle with sporty pretensions).

"Mazda 5."

Heavier (needs the whole range of power of the 2.5L SkyActiv for proper "passing power" on expressways), more expensive, some may not need the 3 rows ever and (if they haven't change much the sizing from the 1st generation) the middle row has too few leg space and slightly too narrow (unexcusable for this market on a people-mover of any size...).

Nota: FW software reads HP as Hewlett Packard, I would as horsepower for this discussion's sake...



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