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Bridging a Linksys WRT54G and Belkin 7230-4 Wirelessly

These steps will create a wireless bridge between a WRT54G as the Gateway and a 7230-4 as an access point (AP). The AP will act as a repeater (extending the range of your wireless network), as well as an AP. The AP will also act as an ethernet bridge, so you can plug it in to an xbox or ps2 (or a computer with ethernet but no wireless) to gain access to your wireless network. I am writing this because I found many tutorials explaining how to connect two WRT54G's together, but nothing explaining how to connect a Linksys and a Belkin. After trial and error, this is what I came up with:

Step 1) If you are using Linksys firmware, you will have to flash a 3rd party firmware to the WRT54G, such as Sveasoft's Alchemy. I am using dd-wrt, which is a variation of Alchemy. I won't discuss flashing, as it is explained very well on other forums.

Step 2) Now that the firmware is upgraded, you can now establish wireless bridging on the WRT54G. If you haven't messed with the IP settings of the router, use IE to access 192.168.1.1 to get to the web-interface of the router. Go to the "Wireless" tab. In "Basic Settings, change the Wireless channel to 11 (or whatever works for you, but the two units must be on the same channel, the default for Linksys is 6 and the default for Belkin is 11). Click on the "WDS" link on the far right. Change the drop down menu to LAN and type in the WLAN MAC address of the Belkin. Click "Save Settings" button. You are done with the WRT54G.

Step 3) Clear all settings in the Belkin router by pushing in the reset button on the back and holding for 10 seconds. You will see all the lights blink green, then orange, then router will go back to normal with all factory settings.

Step 4) Connect to the 7230-4 with an ethernet cable directly from a computer (do not go from the WRT54G) and plug into one of the blue ports (not the green one). It is helpful if you are doing this on a different computer than the one the Linksys is connected to. You can now access the web-based interface through 192.168.2.1. Click on "Use as Access Point" on the menu at the left, then click "Enable". The new default IP address will be 192.168.2.254. You can change that 254 to whatever you like as long as it's less than 255. Remeber what you set it at, or you will be doing another hard reset. Click "Apply Changes", then change the address in you web browser to the new IP address (e.g. 192.168.2.254).

Step 5) You are now in the web-interface of the AP. Click on "Wireless Bridge" on the menu at the left. "Enable Wireless Bridging" should already be selected. Select "Enable Only Specific Access Points To Connect" as well, and put in the WLAN address of the WRT54G. Note: It is very important to be working with the WLAN address of both units, and NOT the LAN address. Click "Apply Changes". Lastly, make sure that the unit is on the same channel as what you set the Linksys to.

Step 6) Log out of the web-interface and unplug the power to the Belkin, wait a few seconds, and plug the power back in. The two units should now be bridged. To test it out, plug a separate computer into the the Belkin and see if you can access the internet or view files on the computer connected to the Linksys. No computer or other device needs to be plugged into the Belkin for it to be bridged, so it can sit in a closet or something if all you want to do is extend your wireless range.

The only problem I have is that once the Belkin is rebooted and bridged to the Linksys, I can no longer access the web-interface via 192.168.2.254. The only way I can get back into the Belkin is to do the hard reset, make my changes and go through steps 4, 5 & 6 again. If anyone solves this problem, let me know how.

Hope this helps someone!

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Sharing Wireless Connections - A legal perspective

A legal view in layman's terms The recent arrest of a Florida man on charges of unauthorized use of a wireless network could set legal ground rules for open Wi-Fi access.

A man sitting in a Chevy Blazer in a residential neighborhood reportedly was poking around nearby wireless networks in violation of computer crime laws, according to local police.

Welcome, Google user!
If this story isn't what you're searching for, try these other News.com search results for "wifi arrest":

* Year in review: Wi-Fi reaches new heights

More ...
This appears to be the first arrest in which the sole offense was allegedly accessing a wireless network without prior authorization, and it's already being viewed as a probable test case. CNET News.com interviewed legal scholars to ask what rules apply to Wi-Fi (also called 802.1x) hot spots.

Is it legal to use someone's Wi-Fi connection to browse the Web if they haven't put a password on it?
Nobody really knows. "It's a totally open question in the law," says Neal Katyal, a professor of criminal law at Georgetown University. "There are arguments on both sides."

That doesn't make much sense. Is there a specific law that regulates Wi-Fi access?
Sort of. The primary law is the federal Computer Fraud and Abuse Act.

You can read it for yourself, but the important part (check out paragraph (a)(2)) covers anyone who "intentionally accesses a computer without authorization or exceeds authorized access." Nobody knows exactly what that means in terms of wireless connections. The law was written in 1986 to punish computer hacking--and nobody contemplated 802.1x wireless links back then.

What do prosecutors think?
We asked the U.S. Justice Department on Thursday. A department representative who did not want to be quoted by name said, essentially, that it depends on the details of each case.

The representative said in an e-mail exchange: "Whether access is considered authorized can be determined in part by the precise circumstances of access, just as it would be in the physical world. The prosecutor and jury would look at how the access was accomplished and what was done with the access before definitively determining that it was unauthorized." In other words, the representative said, someone sitting in a company's parking lot at 3 a.m. for the sole purpose of network connectivity might be viewed as a lawbreaker.

Will we ever get a straight answer?
Yes, but expect it to take a while. "This is a problem with the way the legal system works," says Orin Kerr, a law professor at George Washington University who has written a detailed article on unauthorized network access. "Nobody knows how an ambiguous law works until a prosecution is brought and a court decides."

Alternatively, Congress could rewrite the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act to clear things up, but nobody expects this to happen anytime soon.

How about sharing? Is it legal for me to share my cable modem or DSL connection with my neighbors?
In many cases the answer is no. It depends on the wording of your contract with your broadband provider. Many don't want you to share. As far back as 2002, Time Warner Cable was sending warnings to customers with open Wi-Fi access points, and a year later it sued an apartment complex on charges of illicit sharing. Also, AT&T Broadband has acknowledged monitoring customers for "inordinately high" usage.

"Our terms of service for Verizon Online DSL customers do prohibit them from sharing their connection," says Verizon spokeswoman Bobbi Henson. "The service is meant for use in one location, which would be their home."


What happens if someone does something unsavory with my Wi-Fi connection? Can I get in trouble?
This is another area of ambiguity. "I don't think you would ever be held vicariously liable for unwittingly allowing someone to use your network even if they're trafficking in child pornography. You're just considered a victim in that case," says Christian Genetski, an information security lawyer at Sonnenschein, Nath and Rosenthal. "It'd be different if you set up your own open relay server and looked the other way while spammers sent billions of messages through your open relay, and you were put on notice and did nothing to stop it."

Still, one reason to tighten up your Wi-Fi security is that an open wireless connection can be used for mischief. In September, a California man pleaded guilty to spamming people through open Wi-Fi hot spots.

Are state laws about unauthorized access different?
Yes, but often not in an important way. Genetski says that "as a general rule, most states model their computer crime laws after (the federal law)."

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I agree with most of what you posted.

I'll post back later tonight or tomorrow with some more detailed comments and then figure out how to incorporate in the posts

I've seen you post this information as part of other threads and have mostly agreed

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RightHere and hunter777 - no need for apologies.

A valuable and respectful discussion. And having it in this thread will help others find it

I've made the following changes in this thread

1. Changed the configuration post to included WPA2 and directly linked it the secuirty post. Included a note that indicates that only WPA2 should be considered secure

2. Updated the security post with the same caution about WEP and WPA.

3. Linked the security post to the this discussion

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I got few problems. I can't get any signal from my router, here is my setup:

I have SBC dsl, Netgear 614 G router, & 2 AirLink 101 G pci cards in two room. Each of these desktops approximately 75 feet from the router. Room1 is seperated by brick wall & Room2 is not.

Only one time in Room1 I got some signal for about 5 minutes then it died. Totally no signal in both room. It is difficult to wire the two rooms.

How can I get the signal? Is my router or wirless pci card could be bad? Will a signal booster be help? Please help, someone who had similar problem.

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1. Bring your gear into the same room. If you can get your devices to connect, then you hardware works
2. See this post for your alternatives, if you have good hardware
3. Please post back in a new thread (to better make your problem searchable by others and to avoid cluttering up this one). When you do, please include the details requested in sticky #1

Good luck!

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Bump,why isn't this staying on top,It was very helpful when I had a 169 IP problem.
Thanks ellory.

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I have verizon with a westell 2200 and a linksys router wrt54g trying to setup a wireless network between pc (wired) and 2 wireless laptops, all can see the router and each other but cannot access webpages through internet explorer, everything was setup according to instructions any help would be appreciated thanks

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I have verizon with a westell 2200 and a linksys router wrt54g trying to setup a wireless network between pc (wired) and 2 wireless laptops, all can see the router and each other but cannot access webpages through internet explorer, everything was setup according to instructions any help would be appreciated thanks

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1. See the post in this thread that talks about Special issues for Westell and Linksys
2. If that link doesn't solve your problem, be sure to post back with specifically which instructions you've followed


It may be helpful for you to start a new thread, as that will make your issue more visible

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Have a dilemma...got a 6000 square feet house and i want at least 75% wireless signal everywhere in the house. There are 2 floors and i have wood walls. I was thinking about buying the pre-n router from belkin however i called them and asked if i can have an access point to extend the signal however they said no because the pre-n isnt compatible with any access point and the only way i can extend the signal is to have 2 pre-n routers, however they have to be connected by a wire!!!! please let me know what i can do to set up my wireless network. Thanks.

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kahoots - please go to the first post in this thread and look for the link that says My wireless nework doesn't reach far enough

See if that helps. You might also want to follow the Basic Education links to some of the vendor network configuration wizards, but there may not be much information there, as you are pursuing a solution that pushes the technology

When you post back, it would be best if you create a new thread in this (Computer) forum, as the way this forum tends to operate is that threads like this are primarily used for reference and do not tend to be monitored for posting activity.

So, you'll get the fastest "service" by creating your own thread. (We tend to operate a little bit differently, and a lot politer than other FW forums)

Hope this helps

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Hi, when I go to 192.168.1.1, it will not recognize my user ID and password. Any thoughts? Thanks, mrbthree

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Is this the first time logging into your router? if it is read your handbook. It tells you the user name and password.

mrbthree said: Hi, when I go to 192.168.1.1, it will not recognize my user ID and password. Any thoughts? Thanks, mrbthree

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mrbthree said: Hi, when I go to 192.168.1.1, it will not recognize my user ID and password. Any thoughts? Thanks, mrbthreeAssuming that you are bringing up the webpage for your router

1. Try other user ID /password combinations you might have used. Note that many routers allow you to change the password but not the user id, so try the default user ID
2. Make sure that cap lock/num lock are set to your standard usage
3. If they are, try changing them, and re-enter your security info
4. Try the default security information, per the documentation
5. If all else fails, do a hard reset on the router and use the default security informatio

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I need more ports for my network so I connected a wired router to my wireless router. So right now my setup is I have my wireless router is connected to the modem, then on one of the ports on the wireless I have it going to the wired router. The internet net seems to work ok for almost all sites but 1. I can not go to Fatwallet.com on the computer that is connected to the wired (2nd) router. Any ideas?

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You can encounter network issues with two DHCP servers active (i.e. both routers hand out IP addresses)

A better answer is to plug a switch into the wireless router. You can buy a dedicated switch, or you can turn your wired router into a switch by using the management web page to turn off DHCP. If you do this, be sure to stop using the WAN/internet port. All connections should get plugged into the LAN ports

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ellory said: You can encounter network issues with two DHCP servers active (i.e. both routers hand out IP addresses)

A better answer is to plug a switch into the wireless router. You can buy a dedicated switch, or you can turn your wired router into a switch by using the management web page to turn off DHCP. If you do this, be sure to stop using the WAN/internet port. All connections should get plugged into the LAN ports


Seemed to work.

Thank you

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For people who have issues with the MS Wireless XBOX Adapter (MN-740)

There is a connectivity issue if you have MAC filtering enabled. See solution below.


DSLreports forum-"This bridge device passes on the MAC of the device behind it. So if you have MAC filtering on, you have to enter the MAC of the MN-740 as well as the MAC of your Xbox."

If you don't know your XBOX MAC you can just disable the filtering and let your adapter connect. You will see one MAC address in there which you don't have on the list, this is the MAC for your xbox and needs to be added to the list. If you still have problems feel free to send me a PM.

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You've supplied more information than I have been able to extract from either Verizon (who basically said they weren't responsbile for providing information on hardware) and Westell whom I haven't been able to get in contact by either phone or website.

I am an advanced computer user both with hardward and software applications. However I have limited experience in networking. I haven't had any problems in connecting to the internet with the Westell Versalink 327W.

The problem that I am having is a conflict with an IP Address. I'm am currently working from home using "Virtual Office" that was setup by the company where I work. Due to security issues they have decided to setup a SonicWall VPN. Currently the router and SonicWall VPN are using the same IP Address 192.168.1.x. The router takes priority over the VPN and does not allow the computer to recognize the VPN. Your article did an excellent job in describing exactly what I am experiencing. I need to reconfigure my router IP Address to 192.168.2.x so that the conflict will be resolved.

My operating system is Windows XP Professional with SP2. IBM Netvista - Pentium III - 734 MHZ - 256 MB RAM I am using Verizon DSL with a Westell Versalink 327M (which I assume has a built in Linksys router).

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You've supplied more information than I have been able to extract from either Verizon (who basically said they weren't responsbile for providing information on hardware) and Westell whom I haven't been able to get in contact by either phone or website.

I am an advanced computer user both with hardward and software applications. However I have limited experience in networking. I haven't had any problems in connecting to the internet with the Westell Versalink 327W.

The problem that I am having is a conflict with an IP Address. I'm am currently working from home using "Virtual Office" that was setup by the company where I work. Due to security issues they have decided to setup a SonicWall VPN. Currently the router and SonicWall VPN are using the same IP Address 192.168.1.x. The router takes priority over the VPN and does not allow the computer to recognize the VPN. Your article did an excellent job in describing exactly what I am experiencing. I need to reconfigure my router IP Address to 192.168.2.x so that the conflict will be resolved.

My operating system is Windows XP Professional with SP2. IBM Netvista - Pentium III - 734 MHZ - 256 MB RAM I am using Verizon DSL with a Westell Versalink 327M (which I assume has a built in Linksys router).

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jmullins said: You've supplied more information than I have been able to extract from either Verizon (who basically said they weren't responsbile for providing information on hardware) and Westell whom I haven't been able to get in contact by either phone or website. Pretty amazing isn't it? Although a lot of the credit for the Verizon /Westell information is due to DragonsLore's contribution. (Which I relied on, and then amplified, when I needed to support someone with Verizon network issues
The problem that I am having is a conflict with an IP Address. I'm am currently working from home using "Virtual Office" that was setup by the company where I work. Due to security issues they have decided to setup a SonicWall VPN. Currently the router and SonicWall VPN are using the same IP Address 192.168.1.x. The router takes priority over the VPN and does not allow the computer to recognize the VPN. Your article did an excellent job in describing exactly what I am experiencing. I need to reconfigure my router IP Address to 192.168.2.x so that the conflict will be resolved. Thanks for the feedback. Glad you were able to find the information you needed - and that's exactly the suggestion I would have made.

By the way, I see you're a new member. I assume you found this via google. Just curious as to what search terms you used and how high in the hit list this came up

Post back and let me know if it worked, or if there are modifications that need to be made in what's here to make it more useful for others

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I can't connect when I use the WEP key/passphrase

The problem is probably with the WEP key. Most manufacturers do an extremely poor job of explaining the process. There are basically 2 ways to enter a key: You can enter a key directly or use a passphrase. The passphase is used to generate a key. Your hardware may use the terms Hex and ASCII instead of key and passphrase.

Many people end up entering the same digits in both pieces of hardware, but in one they enter it as a key and the other as a passphrase. Even if both use passphrases, they may have to be compatible hardware for them to generate the same key from the same passphrase.

So, if you're sure what you've entered is the same, enter the hex key instead of the PassPhrase

For 128 Bit WEP, you should be entering a 26 digit hex key into each piece.
For 64 Bit, you should have a 10 digit hex key
If your hardware supports 256, it should be 57

In ASCII, 128 bit is 13 digits
64 Bit is 5 digits
256 is 29

Credit to drodge

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I don't know anything about how to set up a wireless network, please help. I have a ADSL service and a wired modem (it said: ADSL Modem Router), it has no antenna. I am confused, what is a router, a modem/router, a wireless router, a wireless modem/router? Now I want to go wireless, what I should buy and what steps I should take.
Thanks

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truongmymy said: I don't know anything about how to set up a wireless network, please help. I have a ADSL service and a wired modem (it said: ADSL Modem Router), it has no antenna. I am confused, what is a router, a modem/router, a wireless router, a wireless modem/router? Now I want to go wireless, what I should buy and what steps I should take.
Thanks

1. Suggest that you start a new thread for your question, as it is a lot easier for those of here to follow/update
2. Before you do, please follow the links in the beginning of this thread to basic education. We will need you to try to use the proper terms - not because we're being difficult, but because precision is important so that we don't give you bad advice
3. Be as precise as possible with what you're trying to do and with what hardware you have (including service provider brand and model #). Use the third sticky as a guide.

If I were to make a wild guess, I would guess that you have Verizon DSL service and a Westell wired router. If so, there are some special issues you need to be aware of. (There are refereneces in the first post you can follow).

But let's wait unitl you post a new thread with your information before I make any further baseless guesses

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Hi

Thank for your advice. However, I am in Vietnam and I think the ISP here is a little bit different. I aksed them what I should buy if I want to set up a wireless network. They answered that I already had a modem router (named Planet ADSL Modem Router), what I need now is an antenna. Confused

Truongmymy

Ps: I will try to read from the beginning again. Thanks

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Obviously my guess was way off. That will teach me.

I'll look for your standalone thread. But, for some early guidance, it sounds like your DSL modem also has a built in router/DHCP server. (i.e. you can connect multiple PCs via wires)

Although you can buy a standalone Access Point (what they call an antenana), your cheapest solution is likely to be that you should buy a Wireless Router and disable DHCP. Then connect one the wireless router via one of its LAN ports to your DSL modem. (which may have multiple ports).

You can connect wired PCs to the LAN ports of the wireless router (but do not use its WAN/uplink port)

Your wireless PC will communicate to the Wireless Router which will forward information on to the DSL modem/router.

Make sure you read the security information

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Hi
Thanks for your help. I see the option of disable DHCP SERVER in my Modem/Router menu. So do you mean I should disable it, or I should disable the DHCP of my wireless router?

Truong

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truongmymy said: Hi
Thanks for your help. I see the option of disable DHCP SERVER in my Modem/Router menu. So do you mean I should disable it, or I should disable the DHCP of my wireless router?

Truong
You have two choices
1. Disable DHCP in the Modem/Router. Then connect the WAN/uplink port of your Wireless router to the modem/router. And connect all your devices (wired and wireless) to the wireless router
2. Disable DHCP in the wireless router. Then connect a LAN port of the wireles router to the modem/router. Then connect devices either to the LAN ports of the wireless router or the modem/router

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Special Issues using a SonicWall VPN to access a corporate network

You cannot have the SonicWall VPN and your home router use the same IP address (e.g. 192.168.1.1). When this happens, your router IP address takes priority over the VPN and does not allow the computer to recognize the VPN.

The solution: Reconfigure my router IP Address to something different (e.g.) 192.168.2.x so that the conflict will be resolved.

Also, make sure you have IPSec passthrough turned on

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I have a fast wired ethernet cards and would like to use them to transfer information between the computers, not the WiFi network. How do I set up both Wifi Internet link and a hard-wired link between two PCs.

Let the Wireless Router the Default Gteway for the first gigabit NIC on the first PC.
Let the Wireless Router automatically assign an IP address, subnet mask, DNS server, and Default Gteway to that NIC.

Let the Wireless Router the Default Gteway for the wireless NIC on the second PC.
Let the Wireless Router automatically assign an IP address, subnet mask, and DNS server, and Default Gteway to that NIC.

Assign a pair of static IP addresses and subnet masks (i.e. 10.0.100.1 and 10.0.100.2, both with subnet mask 255.255.255.0) to the two gigabit NICs that are connected via crossover cable. Enter nothing for the DNS server and enter nothing for the Default Gteway for these two connected NICs. You can have only one Default Gteway for a PC. And you won't need DNS services for contacting the other PC located on the same subnet.

This will make the wireless router the Default Gteway for both PCs. This will be necessary when trying to contact "foreign" IP addresses (i.e. Internet addresses). So both PCs will use the wireless router when trying to find Internet addresses.
On the other hand, when trying to find addresses on your gigabit network, the two PCs will use NetBIOS for name resolution and, since the IP addresses of the other PC is on the same subnet, should have no problem contacting the other PC via the gigabit NIC.

Note that, upon first connection, it might take a while for the NetBIOS function to get the names of the two PCs. So you might not be able to browse the other PC for a few minutes. You should be able to immediately browse it using its IP address (i.e. \\\\10.0.100.1).

Credit: RebateMonger

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I am just starting with networking and am finding very useful info here. My question is a general one, so I hope it belongs here and not in a new thread.
If the wireless router and Wireless USB adapter recah different levels of security, am I correct in assuming that they can be used at the highest common standard?

I read the posts about security, does this mean that no one should be buying adapters etc. that have anything less than WPA2? Many adapters etc. that I see are only WPA, or even only WEP. Am I handing out my CC info if I use WPA?

Thanks Ellory (and the rest) for putting in so much time and effort to help educate the ignorant!

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